Things That Matter

U.S. Beer Consumption Has Forced People In Mexicali To Fight Against A Major Brewery From Threatening Their Water Supply

Residents of Mexicali, Baja California, Mexico are in a battle with Constellation Brands over a strained water supply. Constellation Brands is the company that produces many recognizable brands of beer, wine and liquor, including Modelo and Corona. The problem with Constellation Brands and the residents of Mexicali centers around the construction of a new facility, according to NPR. The brewery is a $1.5 billion project and the company is already working with the local to open the facility that will bring 750 jobs tot he area. However, residents are protesting because of the company’s plan to the water in Mexicali to make beer destined for U.S. consumers, according to NPR.

“It’s a model of exploitation and capitalism where they basically come for the natural resources to exploit them and take them away to wherever the market is,” Jesus Galaz Duarte, a member of the activist group Mexicali Resiste, told NPR. “When the market grows and has to to satisfy consumers, they’re going to deplete the water here. So what’s going to happen? They’re going to go to another place where there’s more water to satisfy the same market and deplete their water. They’re going to leave this region without the resources to live a dignified life.”

Protesters have been clear in saying they are not against companies bringing jobs and opportunities to their community. They do, however, have an issue with companies coming to Mexicali to use up the resources in the area and leaving the residents to pick up the pieces when they move on. Residents have been voicing their anger with Constellation Brands and the local Mexicali government since late 2017. Some of the protests have turned violent with bloodied protesters squaring off with local police. Constellation Brands released a statement on their website on January 1, 2018 in response to the unrest in Mexicali.

“We are committed to being a good steward of the environment in areas where our employees live and work,” reads a statement titled Responsible Brewing on the Constellation Brands website. “As such, our new brewery will be built to the highest operational and environmental standards. As part of this commitment, we commissioned an independent environmental study to ensure our operations (once up and running) would not adversely impact the local environment, including the local community’s access to and use of water.”

Check back with mitú as this story develops.


READ: Here Are 11 Reasons Why People Took To The Streets For The May Day Protests In Downtown L.A.

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Topo Chico Just Released Its Alcoholic Hard Seltzer Lineup And It’s Already On People’s Shopping Lists

Culture

Topo Chico Just Released Its Alcoholic Hard Seltzer Lineup And It’s Already On People’s Shopping Lists

It’s safe to say that pretty much anything sparkly is having a moment. What started off as the sparkling water craze a few years ago with brands like LaCroix and Bubly, has now moved onto hard seltzer.

With all the commotion it’s hard not to miss the fizzy drink sensation taking over our mini-fridges and supermercados across the country. Now, Coca Cola (which owns iconic the iconic Mexican brand, Topo Chico) is getting in on the trend with its own Topo Chico hard seltzer.

And although I’m not one to usually follow trends, this one seems like one that many of us will want to get behind.

Topo Chico is stepping it up with a new line of alcoholic hard seltzers.

Following in the footsteps of hard seltzer mega weights like White Claw and Truly, Topo Chico is hoping to capitalize on its cult like status with the release of its new hard seltzer lineup.

The iconic Mexican brand (based out of Monterrey but now owned by Coca Cola Co.) has officially launched its debut line of hard seltzer drinks in several countries around the world.

It’s also worth noting because this marks the first time time in years that Coca Cola will be selling alcoholic beverages. The soda giant sold off its wine business in 1983, per the Wall Street Journal. This will be the first time in decades that the beverage giant sells alcohol in the U.S. — and what a fitting time to do so.

So far, the hard seltzer is available in Brazil and Mexico and will hit U.S. shelves in early 2021.

Rightfully so, Topo Chico is initially rolling out the product in Latin America with Mexico City, Puebla, Acapulco, Tijuana, Guadalajara and Monterrey getting the product in Mexico; while Rio de Janeiro and São Paulo will get it in Brazil.

As far as flavors, we’re looking forward to three gluten-free ones, including Tangy Lemon Lime, Strawberry Guava, and Pineapple Twist. The packaging is cool too: the hard seltzer ships in sleep aluminum cans.

And the new drinks are expected to live up to their namesake with a 4.7% alcohol by volume (which is higher than most beers) and just 100 calories per can.

A Coca Cola spokesperson said in a statement that “Topo Chico Hard Seltzer will appeal to drinkers who are looking for a refreshing, lighter alternative to other higher-calorie, higher-sugar alcoholic beverages. Most hard seltzer fans are migrating from beer, so this growth will be incremental to our business.”

Topo Chico only just recently expanded across the U.S. but it’s long been a favorite in Mexico.

Topo Chico has long been a popular water brand across Mexico and in a handful of U.S. states. It’s already carved out a niche market that has made it a cult favorite in places like Austin, TX. Popular for it’s “throwback image” and cool design, Topo Chico has seen massive growth, over the last year U.S. sales jumped 39 percent to nearly $130 million, according to data from IRI, a Chicago-based market research firm.

The secret behind Topo Chico is its mythical origins. The water is sourced from a limestone spring concealed under a mountain in northeastern Mexico. The drink was built on a legend of the thermal waters of the Cerro del Topo Chico, which is where the drink got its name. The story goes that the hidden spring water cured an Aztec princess’ illness. While there’s no way to verify the myth, Topo Chico indeed does come from the same underground spring since 1895.

And as the brand gains recognition across the U.S., it seems only natural that the company would start to add more products to its lineup. In fact, recently the company also released a “lemon-lime” version of its water that’s very much like a limonada.

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President Trump Attempted To Register His Trademark In Cuba In 2008 To Open Hotels And More

Things That Matter

President Trump Attempted To Register His Trademark In Cuba In 2008 To Open Hotels And More

New reports show that President Donald Trump tried to register his trademark in Cuba in 2008. The revelation shows another contradiction from President Trump who promised not to do business in Cuba until the island was a free democracy. The news comes just one week into Hispanic Heritage Month and has left some on social media questioning President Trump’s commitment to Cuban-Americans.

A new Miami Herald story is shining a light on Trump’s attempted business dealings in Cuba.

The story highlights President Trump’s hypocrisy and frequent contradictions throughout his life. The president’s attempted business dealings in Cuba came after he told the Cuban American National Foundation that he would not. During a 1999 speech, President Trump promised that he would not do business in Cuba until the island and the people were free.

For some, the revelation comes as a reminder of President Trump’s record with the Latino community. Latinos have been a constant target for Trump’s attacks since he called Mexican immigrants rapists and criminals when announcing his candidacy in 2015.

The news has angered Latinos who see the gesture as a sign of betrayal.

“I’ve had a lot of offers and, sadly, it’s all be very recently, to go into Cuba on deals. Business deals, real estate, and other deals,” Trump said at the 1999 speech in front of the Cuban American National Foundation. “I’ve rejected them on the basis that I will go when Cuba is free.”

Ana Navarro-Cárdenas, Republican political pundit and outspoken Trump critic, did not hold back.

Navarro-Cárdenas is one Republican who has long stood up against President Trump. Her tweets highlighted the fact that President Trump didn’t try to do business in Cuba just once. There are several instances that show that the president tried to make business happen in Cuba.

“Putting money and investing money in Cuba right now doesn’t go to the people of Cuba,” Trump told the audience in 1999. “It goes into the pockets of Fidel Castro.”

People are not completely shocked by the news.

The Trump administration has also been tied to the Cuban government. Earlier this year, news surfaced that Paul Manafort, Trump’s campaign manager, met with “Castro’s son” in Cuba. The meeting happened in 2017 just days before the inauguration. Emails show Manafort trying to relay information from “Castro’s son” to Kathleen T. McFarland, who would go on to be the Deputy National Security Advisor for the Trump administration.

The 2020 election is going to be one of the most important elections in our lifetime. Make sure you and your friends are registered to vote and commit them to voting. You can go to IWillVote.com or VoyaVotar.com and text TODOS to 30330 today to learn what choices you have to vote in your community and get information on where and when to vote.

You vote is your voice. Make sure you use it this election. So many have fought for your right to vote.

READ: Latinos For Trump Posted A Collage Of Flag For Hispanic Heritage Month And Got Some Wrong

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