Things That Matter

U.S. Beer Consumption Has Forced People In Mexicali To Fight Against A Major Brewery From Threatening Their Water Supply

Residents of Mexicali, Baja California, Mexico are in a battle with Constellation Brands over a strained water supply. Constellation Brands is the company that produces many recognizable brands of beer, wine and liquor, including Modelo and Corona. The problem with Constellation Brands and the residents of Mexicali centers around the construction of a new facility, according to NPR. The brewery is a $1.5 billion project and the company is already working with the local to open the facility that will bring 750 jobs tot he area. However, residents are protesting because of the company’s plan to the water in Mexicali to make beer destined for U.S. consumers, according to NPR.

“It’s a model of exploitation and capitalism where they basically come for the natural resources to exploit them and take them away to wherever the market is,” Jesus Galaz Duarte, a member of the activist group Mexicali Resiste, told NPR. “When the market grows and has to to satisfy consumers, they’re going to deplete the water here. So what’s going to happen? They’re going to go to another place where there’s more water to satisfy the same market and deplete their water. They’re going to leave this region without the resources to live a dignified life.”

Protesters have been clear in saying they are not against companies bringing jobs and opportunities to their community. They do, however, have an issue with companies coming to Mexicali to use up the resources in the area and leaving the residents to pick up the pieces when they move on. Residents have been voicing their anger with Constellation Brands and the local Mexicali government since late 2017. Some of the protests have turned violent with bloodied protesters squaring off with local police. Constellation Brands released a statement on their website on January 1, 2018 in response to the unrest in Mexicali.

“We are committed to being a good steward of the environment in areas where our employees live and work,” reads a statement titled Responsible Brewing on the Constellation Brands website. “As such, our new brewery will be built to the highest operational and environmental standards. As part of this commitment, we commissioned an independent environmental study to ensure our operations (once up and running) would not adversely impact the local environment, including the local community’s access to and use of water.”

Check back with mitú as this story develops.


READ: Here Are 11 Reasons Why People Took To The Streets For The May Day Protests In Downtown L.A.

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Black And Afro-Latino Businesses You Can Support To Financially Uplift The Communities

Things That Matter

Black And Afro-Latino Businesses You Can Support To Financially Uplift The Communities

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Black and Afro-Latino businesses are crucial to the growth of wealth within their communities. Latinas are the fastest-growing population of entrepreneurs. Here is a list of Black and Afro-Latino businesses you can support to help build them up.

Cafe Con Libros

Cafe Con Libros is a feminist bookstore and coffee shop serving the Brooklyn area with conversations about things that matter to the community. Though they are closed because of COVID-19, there are several ways you can continue to support the bookstore.

Azteca Negra

Azteca Negra is a textile, jewelry, and accessories line that is all about being culturally conscious. Marisol Catchings, the artist behind Azteca Negra, is a Black/Chicana artist living in the San Francisco Bay Area. Catchings also aims at recycling by reusing resources to create her products.

Kimpande Jewelry

Kimpande Jewelry is telling the history of African life and people in Puerto Rico. Eduardo Paz, the designer of the products, wanted to highlight the different African cultures brought to Puerto Rico during the slave trade. The brand is all about buying a piece of history with every piece of jewelry.

Marisel Herbal Bath & Body

Based in Puerto Rico, Marisel Herbal Bath & Body is giving people herbal and natural alternatives to the bath and body products on the market. The store, which has been dealing with the COVID-19 lockdowns, is slowly coming back to life and is offering to ship orders to customers.

Ankhari Crochet

There is something so fun about crochet. It might be that it makes us think about the vintage clothing that we have seen in our parents’ photos. It is fun, stylish, and the colors really giving us some life right now.

Ashanti Headwraps

If you are looking for some new and fun headwraps, this is the place to check out. The brand has stores in Puerto Rico and New York and the stores offer up some beautifully crafted headwraps that anyone can wear.

Pensar Africa

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Pensar Africa is more than a place to buy things, it is a place to empower African creators. According to the website, Pensar Africa’s mission is to bring African goods to the Americas while providing the creators the opportunity to make money off of their products.

The Salvi Vegan

This food blogger is showing how you can take your favorite Salvadoran dishes and make them vegan. It is a nice reminder that not all support has to cost something. Some times you just have to show support to help those in the community attract opportunities that come with money.

Party Shop Avenue

This is one company we should keep in mind after this is all over. Who doesn’t want a nice balloon structure at their party? These are truly some beautiful pieces of art that you can use to celebrate just about anything.

READ: This Boricua Is Bringing An Indie Bookstore To Her Neighborhood Of 1.4 Million

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Street Food Vending And Playing With Fire Are Two Ways To Make Some Extra Cash If You Need Some

Things That Matter

Street Food Vending And Playing With Fire Are Two Ways To Make Some Extra Cash If You Need Some

mitú

Side hustles are the lifeline for some of our friends and family. If you think about it hard enough. You will be able to think of someone in your life who makes most of their money from their side hustle. Well, mitú wanted to know more so we went to the streets to talk to people about their various side hustles.

Who knew that fire dancing was something people would consider a side hustle?

So far, “Side Hustle” co-hosts Sasha Merci and David Alvare have explored a few side hustles that were unexpected. There was the luchador who add some comedy to his costume to stand out. There was also the professional cuddler that we still can’t stop thinking about. She makes $120 an hour just cuddling.

Now, Merci and Alvarez are talking with two more entrepreneurs about their own side hustles that will leave some of you speechless. One of them has to do with food and the other has to do with fire.

Luis Jauregui turned his love for food into the food cart known as Jauregui’s Cravings.

“Nobody was really selling this at all,” Jauregui tells Alvarez. “Anywhere that you see this, you’re not going to see a food cart that’s mobile on the sidewalks. I saw that everyone was selling that (tacos and tamales). If you go here, there are like 5 tamaleros selling tamales. On the other street, there’s like two more.”

Jaurgeui adds: “Nobody was supporting me. It was only her since the very beginning. To be honest, I thought she was going to make fun of me or be like, ‘Nah. Don’t worry about. Just go get a job or something.’ But she was like, ‘If that’s your dream and you chase it, just got for it.'”

Andres Trevino is using his courage to play with fire.

“I had gone to this crazy party in the desert,” Trevino explains to Merci. “I was seeing these crazy people and they were spinning fire and I immediately wanted to do it. I walked up to a guy and I asked him if he would teach me. He was like, ‘Here. Play with it. Nobody taught me. Just go on YouTube.’”

Trevino adds: “It’s trial and error. Well, you know, if you play with fire you do get burned. There’s no shocker there. But, you want to take it very seriously. But, yeah. I’ve burned myself a couple of times.”

READ: ‘Side Hustle’ Episode 2: Nude Modeling And Friend Rentals

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