things that matter

AMLO Was Recently Sworn In As Mexico’s New President And Already Delivered On A Campaign Promise

Eneas De Troya / Flickr

Mexico has sworn in their newest president, Andrés Manuel López Obrador, who has vowed to bring an end to corruption, chronic poverty, and extreme violence that have plagued the country. One of his first acts as president will be creating a truth commission on to re-examine the case of 43 students whose disappearance in 2014. The case has come to represent the countless Mexicans who’ve vanished in a decade-long drug war. The Mexican people have been demnading answers for years and López Obrador is promising answers.

The 2014 case of missing students has come to symbolize the violence and corruption that has been seen throughout Mexico for over a decade.

The 43 students, who were studying to be teachers, disappeared in September 2014 from the city of Iguala after local police attacked the buses they were riding on their way to a protest. Survivors say police started shooting at unarmed students. The government of then-President Enrique Peña Nieto claimed that the students were handed over to a local drug gang, Guerreros Unidos (United Warriors), which killed and burned their bodies in a garbage dump.

Yet the Mexican government didn’t provide sufficient evidence to prove their claims. An international team of forensic scientists also contradicted the government report, stating that suspects had been tortured to obtain testimonies. In total, six people were fatally shot and 43 student teachers haven’t been found. To this day the remains of only one student have been identified. The murders have become a symbol of the corruption, dangers, and widespread disappearances throughout Mexico.

One of President López Obrador campaign promises is to re-examine the 2014 incident and has vowed to stop this type of senseless violence.

At a press conference, President López Obrador posed with the parents of the missing students, who displayed photos of their young ones, and promised an end to impunity and begin a wide-ranging investigation.

“The whole government is going to help with this plan and I can assure you that there will be no impunity either in this sad and painful case or in any other,” he told reporters.

The commission will include the parents of the 43 students, their lawyers and representatives from the interior, foreign and finance ministries, along with experts for the investigation. The commission will be led by Deputy Secretary Alejandro Encinas, who is Mexico’s sub-secretary for human rights as well as migration. The commission will begin a new investigation under a special prosecutor’s and will look at all leads, including those that were ignored by the former Mexican government.

Grieving families spoke up at the news conference about how the election of President López Obrador gives hope.

The truth commission will shine new light on the 4-year-old unsolved case that has left many families looking for answers. These families say they’ve been let down by the former Mexican government by not fully investigating the case and not using all available evidence.

“We ask you [López Obrador], as a father, to help us, to pull us out of this dumpster where Peña Nieto left us, and for you to gain the trust of all Mexicans, because we don’t trust anyone anymore,” María Martínez, the mother of one of the missing students, told Mexico Daily News. “We ask the rest of the country to put themselves in our shoes for just one day, for them to feel what it is to have a loved one missing, It’s not only our 43, there are thousands of other families suffering.”

The truth commission will be one of President López Obrador’s first orders but it might also be one of his most important.

For many Mexicans, the truth commission represents part of a new chapter in Mexico, where leadership has deceived and let down many for some time. President López Obrador was elected off a wave of anger about violence and corruption and has already fulfilled one of his campaigns promises to create the commission. Whether any of these families find any answers or clues to what happened to their loved ones is another question.

“I hope that we will soon know the truth. That there’s justice and an example is set so never again human rights are violated in our country,” Pres. Lopez Obrador said at the press conference. “So that no other Mexican suffers the disappearance of their children.”


READ: Mexico’s Outgoing President Is Honoring Jared Kushner With One Of Mexico’s Highest Honors

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She Hasn't Started Her Term Yet And AOC Is Already Offering Interns $15 An Hour

things that matter

She Hasn’t Started Her Term Yet And AOC Is Already Offering Interns $15 An Hour

ocasio2018 / Instagram

If you want 2019 to be all about making positive changes in your life and working to better the lives of the American people, you may want to look into a job in politics. The problem with most civic jobs — such as teachers, council members, working at a non-profit — is that they don’t pay much. In fact, just to get your foot in the door landing an unpaid internship is the only way to go. Thankfully some people are looking out for the common man because they know what it’s like to hustle for money.

Newly elected congresswoman Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez is looking to hire interns and is offering at least $15 an hour.

CREDIT: Instagram/@iridescentwomen

“Time to walk the walk,” Ocasio-Cortez tweeted. “Very few members of Congress actually pay their interns. We will be one of them.”

Ocasio-Cortez, who hasn’t technically started her new job in Washington, is ge changes. Paying her interns is one of them.

According to The Washington Post, a 2017 study found that only 8 percent of House Republicans and 4 percent of House Democrats pay their interns.

The Washington Post also reports that while some senators pay their interns (51 percent to 31 percent); House representatives pay even less (8 percent to 3.6 percent).

This year, however, President Trump has approved a bigger budget for senators, which means they now have money to pay interns.

CREDIT: Twitter/@thehill

According to reports, this year money allotted for senators’ staffing increased from $871 million last year to $920 million for 2018. But it’s still their choice whether they choose to use that money for staffing or other costs.

Thanks to Carlos Mark Vera, founder of advocacy group Pay Our Interns, senators are now feeling the pressure to pay their interns.

“I write to encourage your office to take action and use some of the surplus funds to launch a paid internship program,” Vera wrote in a letter to senators. “So that, once again, opportunities on Capitol Hill are open to all young people, and not just those who can afford to work for free.”

Ocasio-Cortez broke down how the funds are used, and how lawmakers are allowed to do what they want with their own budget.

CREDIT: Instagram/@ocasio2018

“Each member of Congress gets around $1.2 million (give or take a bit) for their entire operating budget,” she said on Twitter. “That’s supposed to cover all salaries (DC and district), rents for district offices, travel home, tech devices, services, contracts, etc. Members decide how it’s all spent.”

She went on to say that “There’s a little wiggle room—everyone isn’t given the same exact amount, but it’s pretty close. If you’re from a district with high transportation costs, high rents (urban/suburban areas), or both, it can have the potential to pressure wages downward for similar operations.”

She’s basically getting $20,000 to hire four interns. But as she said, she wants to pay them at least $15 an hour.

CREDIT: Twitter/@Ocasio2018

Are you interested in working for her? Apply here. And good luck.


READ: It’s The 21st Century And Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez Is Using Social Media To Call Some Things Out

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