Latinos Showed Up In Record Numbers To Vote In The 2018 Midterm Elections

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The 2018 midterm elections, like all midterm elections, was a referendum on what the American people think about the president’s performance. While some Latino-backed candidates, like Beto O’Rourke in Texas, lost, Latino voters turned out in record numbers. Here’s a quick breakdown of the Latino vote in the 2018 midterm elections.

It’s clear that Latinos showed up to the polls to vote in higher numbers in this year’s midterm elections.

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“Latino voters played a pivotal role in taking back the House,” Rep. Ben Ray Lujan, chairman of the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee (DCCC), said in a press conference this week, according to the Associated Press. “Evidence is clear: Early and active and robust outreach to communities of color — in this case, into the Hispanic community — clearly pays off.”

The Democratic Party said they invested $30 million to engage Latino and other minority voters.

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Here are some extraordinary numbers provided by Voto Latino:

  • 28 percent of Latinx voters voted for 1st time in 2018.

  • 94 percent state that they will vote in local and national elections moving forward.

  • Majority of people said they voted because it was their responsibility, about 30 percent did so to represent their community.

  • 21 percent said they did not vote because they did not feel prepared enough.

  • 44 percent had still not been contacted by a campaign or party.

Bernard Fraga, an assistant political science professor at Indiana University, who’s been analyzing voting in Texas, primarily within the Latino community, found that Latinos voted in the midterm elections as much as they had in the 2016 presidential election. The numbers show that people were more engaged in this midterm elections than in midterm elections in the past.

“What we’re seeing is that it can be done as long as Democrats employ a strategy for reaching Latinos who aren’t registered and don’t usually vote,” Fraga told the Dallas News. “I don’t think it’s guaranteed, but a continued, all-hands-on-deck effort to reach young, Latino voters could make Texas fully competitive.”

The Pew Research reports that more Latinas voted than Latinos.

Dan Sena, the DCCC executive director, told the Associated Press that a polling company called Latino Decisions had focus groups throughout the country in order to inform them about the issues.

“What we wanted was a real, organic way to engage Latino voters and Hispanic voters across the country with a message that was positive and a reason to participate,” Sena said to the Associated Press. “We did a fair amount of studying how to create urgency without it feeling overtly heavy.”

The message clearly worked. Pew shows that once again Latinos voted for the Democratic party rather than Republican. An estimated 69 percent of Latinos voted for the Democratic candidate and 29 percent backed the Republican candidate.

The Latino vote really contributed to the record number of voter turnout in Florida.

According to Pew, a record 2.2 million Latinos registered to vote this year in Florida, an 8.4 percent increase over 2016. “This is nearly double the increase from the previous midterm election in 2014, when Hispanic voter registration increased 4.6 percent over 2012,” Pew stated.

Those numbers are only expected to increase as we enter election season. Several organizations are looking to increase their aim at registering more Latinos.

Remember, there’s still many votes that have yet to be counted in Florida and Georgia. We’re eagerly awaiting those results as well.


READ: How Latinos Made History Across The Country During The Midterm Elections

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