Things That Matter

Latinos Are On Strike In Wisconsin To Protest Their Sheriff’s Interest In Working With ICE

Thousands of people flooded the streets of Milwaukee, Wisconsin today as part of a protest called #DayWithoutLatinos. The protest was a direct response to Milwaukee County Sheriff David Clarke Jr., who wants to make his officers participate in the Secure Communities Program, or 287 (g). The program deputizes police officers and other members of law enforcement to act as federal immigration agents. It was implemented by George W. Bush in 2008, according to Politifact. Sheriff Clarke said he’s in full support of President Trump’s promise to ramp up and strongly enforce immigration policies.

Milwaukee’s predominately-Latino south side was full of protesters showing their solidarity with immigrant and refugee Wisconsinites.


According to NBC, thousands of Wisconsinites from around the state came to Milwaukee by bus to protest the Milwaukee County Sheriff’s interest in cooperating with President Trump, who recently signed an executive order that attempts do away with “sanctuary cities.”

The protest was organized by the immigration rights group Voces de la Frontera.


“Trump wants to paint immigrants as something we should be afraid of,” Christine Neumann-Ortiz, the director of Voces de la Frontera, told NBC. “When people do this general strike, what they show is that on the contrary, immigrants are lifting up this economy and when they withhold their contributions we see a decline.”

The protesters believe law enforcement officials shouldn’t be used to do the work of immigration agents.


“287 (g) might be a law but it is an unjust law,” Milwaukee County Supervisor Supreme Moore Omokunde told WPR. “I say that we can just add this one extra thing to the list of reasons why Sheriff Clarke should resign now.”

This isn’t the first time Wisconsin has seen its Latino population fight back against such laws.

@AntonioArellano / Twitter
CREDIT: @AntonioArellano / Twitter

In 2016, Milwaukee saw a #DayWithoutLatinos in protest against Assembly Bill 450 and Senate Bill 533. AB 450 was a bill that would have allowed Wisconsin police to investigate people’s citizenship and detain and deport those who were undocumented. SB 533 effectively blocks the state from issuing any identification cards to anyone who is undocumented.

Protesters in Milwaukee not only had each other for support, but the support of state officials, including Senator Chris Larson.


“We wanted to show them that they can look up and realize that they are not alone,” Sen. Larson told NBC. “That there are leaders in their community who are standing up and will stand up with them to make sure they are not alienated and deported without due process.”

Several businesses in the area joined in the strike to further show the impact of these immigration policies.


“We are not waiting for history to happen,” Sen. Larson told NBC.


“We are showing right away that this is not tolerable and we will not go quietly and allow this to happen,” Larson added.


READ: In Protest Against Trump’s Immigration Ban, 1,000 NYC Bodega Owners Closed Up Shop For A Day

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Rihanna Revealed A Childhood Experience That She Says Connects Her To Mexican Migrants In The U.S.

Entertainment

Rihanna Revealed A Childhood Experience That She Says Connects Her To Mexican Migrants In The U.S.

Badgirlriri / Instagram

Rihanna has never been afraid to speak her mind. She’s a woman who speaks up for issues she cares about and people listen to her. That’s why so many love her – present company included.

The ‘Umbrella’ singer, how has been kind of off the musical radar as of late, spoke out in a new interview with British Vogue and she had a few things to say about her upcoming music, where she’s been living, and her relationship with migrant communities.

Rihanna continues to use her platform and reach of over 200 million followers across social media to bring awareness to social issues that are important to her.

Credit: Chesnot / WireImage

In an interview with Vogue, the creator of “Fenty Beauty” explained feeling empathy with Mexicans and Latinos who are discriminated against in the United States, since she says that she knows how it feels to be on the end of discriminatory policies.

“The Guyanese are like the Mexicans of Barbados,” she said. “So I identify—and that’s why I really relate and empathize with Mexican people or Latino people, who are discriminated against in America. I know what it feels like to have the immigration come into your home in the middle of the night and drag people out.”

Similarly, she recalled the times in which she suffered and the difficulties her and mother experienced when they emigrated from Barbados.

Credit: badgirlriri / Instagram

Rihanna was born Robyn Rihanna Fenty in St. Michael, Barbados to a Guyanese mother and Barbadian father.

In the Vogue interview, she added: “Let’s say I know what that fight is like. I have witnessed it, I have been there. I think I was eight years old when I had to live that in the middle of the night. So I know how daunting it is for a child, and if my father had been dragged out of my house, I can guarantee you that my life would have been a disaster.”

In that same Vogue interview, Rihanna confessed to something that few people outsider her inner circle even knew.

Credit: badgirlriri / Instagram

She explained that in recent years she has become a bit of a nomad, having a house in London, Paris, Barbados and Mexico, where she feels more relaxed.

“I just love Mexico. I really need to do my DNA test,” she jokingly told Afua Hirsch of Vogue. Perhaps she was an agave plant, in a past life, she pondered.

Rihanna has been vocal about immigrant rights in the past and takes great pride in her origins.

Credit: badgirlriri / Instagram

The Grammy Award winning singer and entrepreneur has very publicly thrown shade at President Trump over his cruel immigration policies.

Rihanna, who’s been appointed as the ambassador of her native country Barbados, is no stranger to political matters. She sent a cease-and-desist letter to President Donald Trump in early November after he played her music at one of his rallies. She also rejected the opportunity to perform during the Super Bowl LIII in February 2019 out of protest for Colin Kaepernick.

Plus, in an interview with The Cut last year about the word ‘immigrant’, she said: “For me, it’s a prideful word. To know that you can come from humble beginnings and just take over whatever you want to, dominate at whatever you put your mind to. The world becomes your oyster, and there’s no limit. Wherever I go, except for Barbados, I’m an immigrant. I think people forget that a lot of times.”

Students Hold Sit-In To Protest Teacher Who Told Their Classmate To ‘Go Back To Your Country’

Things That Matter

Students Hold Sit-In To Protest Teacher Who Told Their Classmate To ‘Go Back To Your Country’

A group of students at Nicholas Senn High School in Chicago held a sit-in this week to protest a racist comment made by a gym teacher. According to students, a group of students stayed seated during the national anthem and a gym teacher told a Latina student to “go back to your country” in response.

Nicholas Senn High School students in Chicago held a sit-in to protest a teacher’s offensive comment.

According to NBC News, 17-year-old Yésica Salazar said she was at a Hispanic Heritage Month assembly when the Pledge of Allegiance was performed. She and other students remained seated as a form of protest against the anti-immigration rhetoric and policies in the country.

The incident allegedly occurred as the students were leaving the assembly for not standing. When they left, a teacher stopped the student and told her that she should “go back to your country.”

A video on Twitter shows the principal addressing the protesting students.

“I notified everybody within three hours of receiving the report. It is all in writing,” Principal Mary Beck told the students. “It is all time-stamped. I did my job. I continue to follow through based on the guidelines and policies that we have in place. Every time.”

Despite the answer, the students chanted back at her saying, “So, why is he still here?”

The school is predominately Latino and Black.

Senn High School is predominantly Latino and black. According to data, Nicholas Senn High School is 25.8 percent Black, 42.3 percent Latino, 11.2 percent white, and 17.5 percent Asian.

The “go back to your country” comment has grown in popularity since President Trump took office. There have been examples of comment shared all over social media and is directed to Black, brown, and Asian people. There have even been instances when people have used this phrase against Native American people. To be clear, it has nothing to do with immigration and everything to do with racism.

People on social media are celebrating the students for holding people in power at their school accountable.

What do you think about the protest and response?

READ: Another Sexist Man Has Mocked The Feminist Protest Movement Sweeping Latin America By Dressing Up As A Victim