Things That Matter

Three Bisexual Women And Other Queer Activists And Politicians Changing Their World

Members of the LGBTQ community have made significant advancements in recent years in the name of equality. LGBTQ people are in elected positions and are fighting for the rights of people in and out of the LGBTQ community. One community often overlooked is the bisexual community. Here are a few queer Latinos who are turning the tides in politics and acceptance.

Emma Gonzalez

When tragedy struck at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida earlier this year, Emma Gonzalez started her gun reform campaign. The high school senior took a tragic moment and is championing the fight to pass gun reform legislation. She is openly bi and told Yahoo being proud of who she is has helped her be stronger in taking up the mantle for gun reform. “They’re definitely linked for me personally. If I wasn’t so open about who I was I never would’ve been able to do this.”

JoCasta Zamarripa

Wisconsin state representative JoCasta Zamarripa has been serving in the 8th Wisconsin State Assembly district since 2010. Two years later announced she is bisexual in an interview with The Milwaukee Journal Sentinel. Zamarripa is the first Latina elected to the Wisconsin legislature. Zamarripa is making history with a one-two punch as an out Latina in politics.

Evelyn Mantilla

Evelyn Mantilla was the OG bisexual politician who helped crash the glass ceiling to welcome in other LGBTQ politicians. Mantilla, who is originally from Puerto Rico, was elected in 1997 as a state representative for the heavily Latino 4th district of Connecticut. That same year, she came out as America’s first openly bisexual state official.

4. Lupe Valdez

Lupe Valdez, the first Latina and first woman to be sheriff in Texas state history, has thrown her sheriff’s hat in the race for governor. “I’ve dedicated my life to defending Texas, and I’m not done yet,” Valdez said in a news conference to announce her candidacy. She is openly gay and was even surprised by her girlfriend in 2016 when she received a shiny new red Tesla for her birthday.

Maricón Collective

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This group of queer Chicano activists and artists want to reclaim the Spanish slur ‘maricón’ (translation: faggot) through art. Carlos Morales, Rudy Bleu, Michael Rodriguez, and Manuel Paul host events throughout Los Angeles to empower and entertain the local LGBTQ community—and to encourage them to reclaim the power of the word.

Robert Garcia

When Robert Garcia was elected to serve on the Long Beach City Council in 2009, he made history in the third-largest city in Southern California in three ways: he was the youngest person, first Latino, and first gay Latino to be serving on the city’s council. Then in 2014 he made history again as Long Beach’s first openly gay mayor. Under his mayorship, he has helped Long Beach gain a $3 million innovation grant from Bloomberg Philanthropies and revived the city’s Economic Development Commission.

7. Carlos Padilla

Undocumented immigrants might feel as if their voice isn’t always represented in politics, and perhaps even more so for queen undocumented immigrants. But queer undocumented immigrant and activist Carlos Padilla is trying to change that. Padilla wrote a powerful op-ed in 2015 that reiterated how LGBTQ immigrants are some of the most vulnerable in an already marginalized group of society. Padilla has helped lead marches, gather activist groups and received awards for his youth leadership.


READ: After Posting Photos With His Boyfriend, Jenni Rivera’s Youngest Son Comes Out As Bisexual

Do you know any inspiring bi or LGTQ activists? Share this with them!

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People Are Sharing Their Personal Experiences Of Feeling Shame Over Their Bisexuality And It’s Pretty Heartbreaking

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People Are Sharing Their Personal Experiences Of Feeling Shame Over Their Bisexuality And It’s Pretty Heartbreaking

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It’s no secret that more than most sexualities, the bisexual experience is often invalidated and largely stigmatized. Often times, people who are bisexual are forced to shoulder the social stigmas from partners, friends, and family who believe that they are hiding their homosexuality, are sexually promiscuous, and or more likely to spread sexually transmitted diseases.

Curious about the effects of the stereotypes, we scoured Reddit for personal experiences with the sense of shame some people feel attached to their bisexual identity.

Check out what we found in one thread below.

https://www.reddit.com/r/bisexual/comments/4r4ha4/does_anyone_else_feel_shame/

So, I’m bi and finding some videos on the youtubes about bisexuality and started watching videos of people saying being bi doesn’t exist. I also noticed on some apps like grindr and a few others who seemed to have a ‘problem’ with my being bi for some reason. Which makes me feel bad about being bi :c

“I was really insecure about my sexuality for a long time… I still kinda am but I’m mostly ok with it Now. Sometimes I even love it. I’m not really ashamed of it anymore, I’m just incredibly introverted and very private so I’m not open to most people about it. It took me several years to come to terms with my sexuality and accept myself and I still struggle with it sometimes. I used to wish I could just be straight. But now I feel like if there was something I could do to make myself straight, I wouldn’t do it.”-Strawbeerylemonade

“No I don’t feel bad about who I am. If someone doesn’t like me for who I am, I don’t want to date them.”- EnLaSxranko

“There is a lot of misconceptions about us in the gay and straight community. I don’t feel shame but I feel awkward. No matter who I choose to be with I feel I need to explain. I’m currently in an amazing opposite gender relationship with a queer woman who I adore and we encounter bi-phobia. Today I kissed her at Pride. We are in love and queer.
I hold my relationships with my male partners in high regard and will never be ashamed that I loved them (because of their gender). So like it or not, as queer people my love for my girlfriend will be political. oh well. I’m used to it and so is she.”- torontomammasboy

“Kinda. I find it embarrassing for some reason, kinda like if I had a skin condition or something. I actually came out to my parents yesterday and they haven’t disapproved or anything but I feel really weird that they know now. Kinda exposed feeling. It’s weird. I also get the whole shame part. I don’t want to be public about my same sex attractions in the sense that they are almost purely sexual in nature. I would probably not date a guy. I’m ashamed I have sexual feelings for men but really wouldn’t date them (I could do a BFF with benefits thing but it wouldn’t be romantic at all and I don’t think I’d ‘fall in love’).”- CompartmentalizeMyBi

“I’m 25 and am currently having my homophobic mother staying with me until she finds her own place. I’ve came out to her a couple of years ago, but she dismissed it as “foolishness” and has basically been in denial about it ever since. I basically have to tip-toe around her if I want to have another guy in my own apartment. That combined with my own internalized homophobia and biphobia makes it hard not to feel ashamed of my own attractions.” – acethunder21

“No I do not feel any shame. Mostly because I actually don’t give myself any label at all. And why I don’t give myself one is because honestly, I hate labels. For jobs, for relationships, for sexuality. It all is just not something I want to deal with. Now I’m not saying that any of the the labels you give yourself aren’t any real to you. You’re reality is just as personal to you, as mine is to me. And I don’t want to get in the way of how you want to live. And that’s how everyone should really treat each other about their sexuality. I’m nearly 17, (6 days from now) and male. I’m in love with my first, and 7-month boyfriend. A lot of my friends and family know this, and I didn’t feel any different coming out about it to them than when they did not know. When wondering about your sexuality, learn it like you would playing an rpg game. Go out and explore, and find what you like, and make it yours. Hopefully my tired 1:30 am rant meant something. Have a happy night and 4th if your in the good ol’ U.S. Of A like me.”-PopsOnTheRox

“I stopped giving a f*** about what people think eons ago. Opinions are like assholes, everyone has them. Yours is the only one that should matter to you. Make yourself proud and you’ll find people respect and admire it.”-StroppyMantra

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Disney Just Confirmed Their First Bisexual Lead Character And She’s Dominican!

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Disney Just Confirmed Their First Bisexual Lead Character And She’s Dominican!

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Whooot whoot!!

Disney Channel is officially bumping up its diversity efforts. The television channel recently confirmed that it is debuting its first bisexual lead character in a new series. Disney’s latest series “The Owl House” is an American animated fantasy television series created by Dana Terrace and premiered earlier this year on January 10, 2020.

Luz Noceda is the series’ 14-year-old Dominican-American girl and the channel’s first LGBTQ+ character.

While Luz isn’t the first LGBTQ+ Disney character to be featured on Disney (that goes to a character in Pixar’s short “Out” on Disney Plus) she is the first bisexual character to appear on a Disney television series.

“The Owl House” is a series that follows Luz a teenage girl who accidentally falls into a portal leading to another world instead of going to a juvenile detention summer camp.

Speaking about making Luz, her creator Dana Terrace shared that initially “certain Disney leadership” had not been thrilled about the LGBTQ+ character.

“I was very open about my intention to put queer kids in the main cast. I’m a horrible liar so sneaking it in would’ve been hard,” she explained in a tweet. “I was told by certain Disney leadership that I could not represent any form of bi or gay relationship on the channel.”

Terrace, who identifies as bisexual, said she fought hard to have Luz be bisexual on the Disney series as well. “Luckily my stubbornness paid off, and now I am very supported by current Disney leadership,” she explained.

Fortunately, viewers have given Terrace and her character quite a bit of support.

Fans of the series have thanked Noceda for bringing the representation of the LGBTQ+ community to Disney.

Alex Hirsch, the creator of Disney’s “Gravity Falls,” shared in the comments that Disney kept him from including LGBTQ+ in his series. “Apparently ‘happiest place on earth’ meant ‘straightest,'” he remarked. “Thanks to Dana Terrace and team, there are explicitly queer animated main characters on Disney TV… This time, Disney- you did good.”

In response to all of her support, Terrace urged her supporters to continue to fight for representation on-screen and other forms of media. “Representation matters!” she exclaimed.

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