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Your Latino Name Could Be Working Against You When Trying To Buy Or Rent A Home

If you’ve ever applied for a lease or a mortgage and were denied despite having good credit and no dents on your background check, there’s a chance it could be because of your name. Last year, a study by the University of Missouri found that some employers discriminate against job applicants with traditionally black and Latino names. New poll figures, released by NPR, go deeper into how people of color feel they’ve been affected by housing discrimination.

According to NPR, 31 percent of Latinos say they have experienced discrimination when looking for a house or apartment.

NPR spoke to Gustavo Douaihi and Laura Smith, who recently got married and were looking to rent an apartment. Smith says she told her husband, Gustavo, to look into an apartment that they both liked. Douaihi says he left a voicemail with his name but never heard back. Laura reached out to the landlord and left her name on the voicemail.

The woman texted me back like within five minutes,” Laura told NPR. “It was so clear that the landlord responded differently to me than to my husband,” she said. “The only different information she had between the two voicemails was … a Hispanic name.”

If you need further proof that discrimination exists based on your ethnic name or profile picture, look no further than the lawsuit AirBnb faced last year.

In 2016, AirBnB almost faced a class action lawsuit from people who said they were discriminated against because they were black. Soon after, #AirbnbWhileBlack began trending on social media, with people sharing their AirBnB discrimination stories.

Now AirBnB will fine or ban any AirBnB renter if they discriminate against anyone because of their ethnicity or for any other reason.

The poll also shows Latinos feel even more discrimination when applying for work. Thirty-three percent of Latinos say they have been discriminated against when applying for work, while 32 percent say being Latino has affected their salary or getting a promotion. Even more startling is that 1 in 3 Latinos say they have faced discrimination in some way.

NPR polled 3,453 adults in the nation for the survey, and 803 identified as Latino.

Click here to read NPR’s entire survey.

READ: Judge Rules Arizona Educators Were Discriminating Against Mexican-American Studies

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The Trump Administration Starts Rolling Back TPS Protection For Nicaraguans And Hondurans

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The Trump Administration Starts Rolling Back TPS Protection For Nicaraguans And Hondurans

Joe Raedle / Getty / Gage Skidmore / Flickr

The Trump administration has issued another blow to the immigrant community in the United States. According to an announcement by the acting Secretary of Homeland Security Elaine Duke, Nicaraguans with Temporary Protected Status (TPS) will have until January 5, 2019 to either seek permanent residency in the U.S. or plan their return or Nicaragua. Hondurans currently on this immigration program were granted an extension on their expiration date to July 5, 2018. The Washington Post reports that 50,000 Haitians and 200,000 Salvadorans are also currently protected under TPS with expiration dates early next year. However, the announcement about Nicaragua and Honduras makes no mention of those two countries.

Temporary Protected Status is a designation assigned to refugees from countries that have been devastated by natural disasters, wars, or other situations that make it unsafe for people to return to their countries. In total, there are 10 countries that are covered under TPS policies including El Salvador, Haiti, South Sudan, Syria, and others.

“The decision to terminate TPS for Nicaragua was made after a review of the conditions upon which the country’s original 1999 designation were based and whether those substantial but temporary conditions prevented Nicaragua from adequately handling the return of their nationals, as required by statute,” reads the announcement. “There was also no request made by the Nicaraguan government to extend the current TPS status. Based on all available information, including recommendations received as part of an inter-agency consultation process, Acting Secretary Duke determined that those substantial but temporary conditions caused in Nicaragua by Hurricane Mitch no longer exist, and thus, under the applicable statute, the current TPS designation must be terminated.”

Eleanor Holmes Norton, a non-voting delegate to the House of Representative, represents Washington D.C. with a sizable Salvadoran contingency and immediately spoke out against the announcement.

There are around 200,000 Salvadorans currently living in the U.S. as TPS recipients and they renew their status every 18 months. Salvadorans make up the largest population of TPS recipients. D.C. has the second largest concentration of Salvadorans in the U.S. Salvadorans also make up the largest population of Latinos in D.C.

Nicaraguans and Hondurans were first granted TPS after Hurricane Mitch devastated Central America in 1998. The decision by the Trump administration will impact 2,500 Nicaraguans and 57,000 Hondurans. Both Presidents Bush and Obama regularly renewed the protected status allowing for immigrants from the two countries to stay in the U.S.


READ: The Dept. Of Homeland Security Has Confirmed That DACA And Temporary Protected Status Are At Stake

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