Things That Matter

Latino Parents Charged In The Horrifying Abuse And Death Of 12-Year-Old Boy

Monroe Country Sheriff's Dept.

Two Latino parents in Indiana are being charged with neglect and confinement after restraining and starving a young boy to death in Indiana, People reports.

According to officials, 12-year-old Eduardo Fosso was a victim of childhood abuse, with his father and step-mother taking photos and videos of him in restraints and a fitted dog shock-collar around his neck while in a bathtub.

“[He] lived a very sad life, a lot of times under restraint, and his life gradually diminished after repeated acts of abuse by his father with the … knowledge of his stepmother,” said Monroe County Sheriff Brad Swain during a news conference on Tuesday.

The boy’s father, Luis Fosso, 32, could also face murder charges should a forensic test determine that the child’s death is linked to his mistreatment.

“The initial thoughts are that he starved to death,” he said.

Monroe County coroner Joani Shields added that the child was “severely emaciated,” weighing about 50 to 55 pounds.

Fossi and Dayan Media Flores, 25, who were both investigated by child protective services in Florida, where they used to reside, were passing through Indiana for work. They are contracted employees hired to place ads that promote a traveling circus. The couple was accompanied by three other children, a 9-year-old girl, 5-year-old boy and 2-year-old boy. The youth, who appeared to be in good physical health, were placed with a child protection agency.

On Thursday, the father brought Eduardo to Bloomington Hospital after he stopped breathing. The boy appeared to be getting sick while the family was out together hanging leaflets.

“The stepmom said ‘I think we need to go back to the hotel,’ and at that point they did … and he continued to decline from there,” sheriff’s detective Lt. Jennifer Allen said.

The child was declared dead at 3:05 a.m., only 13 minutes after he arrived at the hospital. Employees told law enforcement that the boy exhibited “signs of extreme abuse.” Investigators soon obtained a search warrant and returned to the family’s motel room, where they found chains, ankle and wrist restraints as well as the dog shock-collar. They also discovered videos and photos on the parents’ cell phones and web-based security system that showed how they abused the child.

The parents denied starving Eduardo, though they both disclosed that the father would physically abuse him.

“I was given the explanation that (Eduardo) was the child that acted up the most,” Allen said. “He was the one that they always had issues with.”

In older videos and photographs found, Eduardo appeared to be somewhat “of a normal, happy little boy,” Allen continued. Still, investigators are currently looking into other towns the family visited for work, including Bedford, Nashville and Kokomo, for additional evidence of mistreatment or charges in other jurisdictions.

A sheriff on the case said it was “horrendous” and “beyond anything I’ve worked” in his 20 years as a child abuse investigator.

The couple is currently being held on a $500,000 bond in the Monroe County Correctional Center.

Read: Family Of Slain Chicago Teen Whose Son Was Ripped From Her Womb Is Raising Funds For Newborn’s Medical Bills — Here’s How You Can Help

El Chapo Will Spend The Rest Of His Life Behind Bars But It’s What He Told The Judge That Everyone Is Talking About

Things That Matter

El Chapo Will Spend The Rest Of His Life Behind Bars But It’s What He Told The Judge That Everyone Is Talking About

ABC News / YouTube

A federal judge in Brooklyn, N.Y., has sentenced drug kingpin Joaquín “El Chapo” Guzmán to a term of life in prison without the possibility of parole plus 30 years for his role in leading Mexico’s Sinaloa cartel. A life sentence was mandatory; U.S. prosecutors had asked that three decades be added onto Guzmán’s punishment.

The sentence also includes a multibillion-dollar financial penalty for the wealthy drug dealer.

The former drug lord was sentenced to life in prison plus 30 years.

Credit: @KCRG / Twitter

A federal jury convicted Guzmán in February, finding him guilty of a raft of serious charges, from drug crimes to a murder conspiracy. His conviction included 10 counts of crimes such as narcotics trafficking, using a firearm in drug crimes and money laundering.

The 62-year-old former drug lord was extradited from his native Mexico to the US in January 2017. The terms of his extradition included a pledge that US authorities would not seek the death penalty.

The drug kingpin has repeatedly made headlines during his criminal career — first for the vast power he ruthlessly amassed and later for his seeming ability to break out of any prison in Mexico. In 2015, he escaped from a maximum security prison for the second time, after spending more than a decade eluding Mexican authorities. He lived outside the law for an additional six months, before he was captured in a high-profile operation in early 2016.

He’s also been ordered to pay more than $12 billion for his negative impacts on the country.

Drug kingpin El Chapo was ordered to forfeit more than $12.6 billion in ill-gotten drug money today. Many are already coming out with ideas on hote government should best spend that money.

While others are pointing out the irony in the government taking drug money as if it was simply taking its cut.

El Chapo’s attorney reiterated his call for a new trial over alleged misconduct by jurors.

This case was simply an inquisition. It was a show trial, and how it ended is exactly perfect for that description,” defense attorney Jeffrey Lichtman said. He said the government’s witnesses had included “lunatics and sociopaths and psychopaths” and that “up to five jurors broke the law — violated the law while they were judging Mr. Guzmán for crimes.”

After Guzmán was convicted, his defense team said the trial was tainted, claiming that members of the jury had ignored the judge’s orders not to read about the trial outside of court proceedings.

Guzmán plans to appeal, Lichtman said.

People were anxiously waiting to see if Guzmán would speak at his sentencing.

El Chapo spoke publicly for the first time since his conviction on Wednesday, complaining to a judge that his incarceration at a Manhattan lockup has been absolute “torture” before being sentenced to life in prison plus 30 years.

“I’ve been forced to drink unsanitary water. I’ve been denied access to fresh air and sunlight. The only sunlight I have in my cell comes through in the air vent,” the 62-year-old convicted drug kingpin told Brooklyn federal Judge Brian Cogan ahead of his sentencing.

Guzmán concluded his lengthy remarks by saying, “The United States is no better than any other corrupt country that you don’t respect.”

So where will El Chapo likely be spending the rest of his life?

Since he was sentenced to life, El Chapo will likely be serving that sentence in just one facility – the supermax prison just outside of Florence, Colorado. That is, of course, as long as he doesn’t successfully escape…again.

Many were just counting down the weeks or months until his third escape.

Some on Twitter pointed out that he’s already evaded authorities bascially four times now and made two high-profile escapes, including from a supposed supermax prison facility in Mexico.

Many are questioning how long it will take him and his Sinoaloa cartel to break him out of his cell in Colorado…

READ: Federal Jury Finds Drug Lord ‘El Chapo’ Guilty On All 10 Counts, Faces Life In Prison

This New Facility Cost $12 Million And It’s All Designed To Stop Rampant Avocado Theft

Culture

This New Facility Cost $12 Million And It’s All Designed To Stop Rampant Avocado Theft

avocadosfrommexico / Instagram

So avocado theft is one of the reasons that our beloved aguacate has been getting more and more expensive. According to Mexican authorities, the industry loses more than 12 tons of avocados to theft each day! That’s a lot of missed guacamole potential.

So together with the USDA, one Mexican group is creating a new facility and identifying new shipping routes to help cut these losses which are spiraling out of control.

Avocado growers have teamed up to build a facility that helps prevent theft.

Credit: @poandpo / Twitter

The absolutely depressing rise in avocado prices has left many of us nearly penniless but our problems pale in comparison to those being faced by the agricultural industry in Mexico.

Each and every day nearly 12 tons of avocados are stolen between the orchards and packing plants.

Between 2017 and 2019, Mexico reported 440 avocado theft investigations, and because Mexican-grown avocados made up 78 percent of the U.S. market last year, this spells trouble Stateside as well. Producers lose an average of four truckloads of avocados per day because of organized crime intervention. The majority of Mexican avocados that make their way to the U.S. come from the state of Michoacan, in a city called Uruapan, which accounts for 92 percent of Mexico’s avocado production last year,

I mean, apparently, avocado theft is a legit thing.

Credit: @jckichen / Twitter

And we’re not talking about shoving that $1.99 avocado in your pocket at the supermarket or “forgetting to pay” for a few that may have fallen into your purse.

Back in 2017, three men in California were arrested on suspicion of grand theft of avocados after the disappearance of $300,000 worth of the creamy fruit.

Police believe the men were stealing and selling avocados to unsuspecting customers for at least several months. 

The new $12 million facility is meant to finally address the issue of widespread theft.

A new $12 million facility will be built; a venture between the Association of Export Producers and Packers of Avocado from Mexico (APEAM), the Mexican Department of Agriculture and Agrarian Development (SADER), and also house the local offices for the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA).

Casa APEAM, as the facility is called, will also be part of Mexican officials new strategy to find safer export routes for avocados out of Mexico.

Silvano Aureoles, the governor of Michoacán, said he is working with avocado producers to plot new trucking routes to avoid the theft of trucks and merchandise. Part of these new actions could be exporting the avocados from the Port of Lázaro Cárdenas instead of the Port of Manzanillo, putting surveillance cameras on the road to Lázaro Cárdenas and increasing surveillance of truck shipments out of Michoacán.

And this news couldn’t come soon enough because prices for avocados continue to skyrocket!

Credit: @wdsu / Twitter

Avocado prices have been soaring recently, with a recent report revealing that the national price of Hass avocados has risen by 93 cents since last year.

On the wholesale side (think restaurants, markets), last year a 25-pound box cost $37 but that price has risen to $89 in 2019. That’s a huge and unfortunate increase for lovers of aguacate.

READ: 24 Ways To Use Avocado That Aren’t Guacamole

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