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These Athletes Had To Face The Consequences Of Their Horrific Crimes

@Robinho / Twitter / Simi Valley P.D.

Being a professional athlete, like any other career, does not mean you are immune to the law. There has been a lot of criticism when it comes to how NFL athletes have recently been treated for protesting racial inequality yet some players face no consequences for domestic violence. However, some athletes do have to face the consequences for their actions. Here are some athletes who were arrested and, in some cases, convicted of some horrific crimes, ranging from kidnapping to murder.

1. Bruno Fernandes das Dores de Souza

Often referred to as Bruno, this Brazilian football player was arrested in July 2010 after the woman he was having an affair with disappeared a month earlier. She had told him her son was his and was suing him for child support. Bruno was charged with kidnapping, murder, hiding a body, corrupting minors and forming a criminal gang. His 17-year-old cousin told police he had helped Bruno kidnap his girlfriend. The gruesome details of the crime included cutting up the body and burying parts under concrete while other parts were fed to dogs. Bruno ended up serving close to 7 years in prison out of his 22-year sentence, and then was arrested in 2017 after his defense team had partial blame in delays for his appeal.

2. Omar ‘El Gato’ Ortiz

Former Mexican goalkeeper Omar ‘El Gato’ Ortiz was arrested in 2012 for allegedly being part of a kidnapping ring targeting wealthy families in Mexico. The kidnapping gang even targeted families Ortiz knew personally. Ortiz admitted to picking out two members of a wealthy family for the ring. He is currently still in jail despite not receiving a sentence.

3. Robinho

Robson de Souza, a Brazilian player known by his nickname Robinho, was convicted in 2017 in Italy along with five other men for gang raping a woman at a club in Milan in 2012. Until the appeal process is completed, Robinho’s sentence cannot be enforced under Italian law.

4. War Machine

MMA fighter Jonathan Paul Koppenhaver (whose mother is Mexican and is known by his name War Machine), was arrested in 2014 after porn actress Christy Mack alleged War Machine had assaulted her and her associate. Mack suffered broken bones, missing teeth, a broken nose, a ruptured liver and a fractured rib after the brutal assault. In 2017 he was convicted of assault with a weapon and kidnapping, among 29 felony counts. War Machine was sentenced to life in prison with possibility of parole after 36 years.

5. Tony Ayala Jr.

In the early ‘80s, Mexican-American former boxer Tony Ayala Jr. was convicted of two assaults on women and convicted of the brutal assault of a schoolteacher in the home he burglarized. In 2000, he broke into another woman’s home. Ayala Jr. died of an apparent overdose in 2015 in Texas.

6. Carlos Monzón

Former Argentine professional boxer Carlos Monzón was charged with beating and killing his wife, model Alicia Muñiz in 1988 after strangling her and throwing her off a balcony. The couple was vacationing in Mar de Plata when the brutal attack occurred. After being found guilty, he received an 11-year prison sentence.

7. Aaron Hernandez

Before former NFL player Aaron Hernandez committed suicide in prison, he was arrested and convicted for the murder of Odin Lloyd, a semi-professional athlete. He was found dead in his cell after being acquitted of a double homicide. Hernandez’s death has sparked a growing debate about football players and concussion injuries from the sport.


READ: This Promising Baseball Player Has Been Dropped After A Disturbing Video Surfaced Of Him Assaulting His Girlfriend

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Hurricane Maria Devastated Puerto Rico's Agriculture Industry. This Website Is Helping To Bring It Back

Things That Matter

Hurricane Maria Devastated Puerto Rico’s Agriculture Industry. This Website Is Helping To Bring It Back

prfarmcredit / Instagram

Puerto Rico has faced numerous hardships within the last year as a result of Hurricane Maria. One of the them has been getting fresh produce. Puerto Rico currently imports about 85 percent of its food, a situation that became evident following Maria. That’s why José Nolla Marrero, a 17-year-old Puerto Rican high school student, created E-Farm, a digital e-commerce platform that connects farmers across Puerto Rico with consumers. It’s an ambitious idea that started when Marrero was 15. Two years later is playing a vital role in the revitalization of Puerto Rico.

Food and farming play a huge role in the economic stability of Puerto Rico, which makes platforms like E-farm so important in the island’s recovery.

Before Hurricane Maria hit on Sept. 20, 2017, Puerto Rico was beginning to see signs of an entrepreneurial wave as start up tech companies sprouted up across the island. The 2012-2013 Global Competitiveness Report from the World Economic Forum ranked Puerto Rico third in the availability of scientists and engineers.

Marrero is the perfect example of this young wave of entrepreneurs but instead of wanting to leave the island he wanted to connect with the people there. He participated in multiple entrepreneurship programs that earned him more than $40,000 in grant and seed money to help him develop the platform.

E-Farm was founded on the basis of helping farmers sell their produce to consumers in a modern way. Through the app, you can see and get to know the farmer and where the food is coming from before you buy it.

“I found out that people wanted a way of buying these products directly and that’s how the idea of E-Farm itself came about,” Marrero told NBC News. “My goal with E-Farm is to make every farmer an entrepreneur, so that they can be self sufficient and that they can sell their products directly to consumers.”

When Hurricane Maria hit, E-Farm’s growth was quickly halted because of what the storm did to produce in Puerto Rico.

When E-Farm first launched there was successes but things quickly turned south when Hurricane Maria hit. The storm devastated about 80 percent of all the island’s crops and damaged Puerto Rico’s dairy industry and coffee plantations.

“Hurricane Maria decimated the entire agricultural industry in Puerto Rico, which made it impossible for me to sell, since none of the farmers could sell themselves. I was also personally impacted,” Marrero told NBC News.

After Maria, there was a sense of isolation on the island since there was no electricity. With no internet and no cell service, E-Farm temporarily shut down and Marrero had difficulty even finishing school since he took online courses.

Today E-Farm is seeing a relaunch as the agriculture industry begins to recover in Puerto Rico.

E-farm today has 24 registered farms on it’s website and has shipped goods to consumers across Puerto Rico, New York, Connecticut and as far west as Montana. Marrer is currently in talks with five other farms as well as he tries to keep growing his brand.

Marrero wants the long term vision for E-Farm to be a bridge between farmers and consumers.

For farmers who sell their products on E-Farm, the platform has been instrumental in getting their businesses back up as well.

“Helping a farmer or helping anyone in your community in particular, I’ll put it this way, it feels better than getting an A+,” Marrero said. “It shows how your work really affects people in a positive way.”


READ: Puerto Rico’s Hurricane Maria Death Toll Is Now Close To 3,000 People Instead Of The 64 People Originally Reported

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