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These Latinas Are Dominating The Male-Centric World Of Media

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Women, and especially Latinas, are on the rise leaving their mark on every industry. This is very noticeable in the world of media. From executive producers to journalists, these Latinas are leveling the playing field. Here are the Latinas that are changing the face of media.

1. Maria Hinojosa

Call her the great dame of public radio. Journalist Maria Hinojosa has been the host of NPR’s Latino USA for twenty years and is also the CEO of The Futuro Media Group, which produces the show and is fostering the work of other Latino journalists. Born in Mexico City, Hinojosa moved to Chicago as a child and has racked up several awards for her journalism work, including the Robert F. Kennedy Journalism Award for Reporting on the Disadvantaged and four Emmy awards.

2. Salma Hayek

Good hair day! Hoy el cabello si se comportó! #hair

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Salma Hayek broke both through the glass ceiling and box she was put in during her early Hollywood days. After a few roles in lackluster movies following her move to Los Angeles, Hayek ventured off on her own and started her own production company, which ultimately allowed her to call her own shots. She executive produced and starred in “Frida,” which gave her  an Academy Award nomination for best actress. Her other production successes include “Ugly Betty.”

3. Danielle Sanchez-Witzel

Danielle Sanchez-Witzel has been making a name for herself across multiple TV networks, including most recently at 20th Century Fox Television. She signed an overall deal. Her past credits include consulting producer on “From LA to Vegas,” showrunner and executive producer for “The Carmichael Show,” and co-executive producer of “New Girl.”

4. Soledad O’Brien

Apart from her stellar anchoring gigs, Soledad O’Brien can also add chairwoman and founder to her list of titles. The Hearst TV and former CNN anchor founded Starfish Media Group in 2013, which is a production and distribution company.

5. Victoria Alonso

A native of Buenos Aires, Victoria Alonso has had a hand in many of Marvel’s recent blockbuster hits. She has executive produced “Black Panther,” “The Guardians of the Galaxy” franchise, “Ant-Man,” as well as upcoming projects including “Captain Marvel.”

6. Jacqueline Hernández

Jacqueline Hernández is tapping into the way Latinos access MMA and sports entertainment as the current president of Combate Americas. Before joining Combate last month, Hernández was the CMO at NBCUniversal Hispanic Enterprises.

7. Rebecca Aguilar

Encouraging women and Latinos in journalism is Rebecca Aguilar’s specialty. She founded the Facebook group ‘Latinas in Journalism’ last November and the 2,000 current members have used it as a forum to find job postings, share news, advice and encourage each other. Aguilar is a current member of the National Association of Hispanic Journalists and a former television reporter.

8. Gloria Calderon Kellett

TV!!! @atxfestival @odaatnetflix @netflix

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It’s hard filling the shoes of a legendary television producer and writer Norman Lear, but Gloria Calderon Kellett is stepping into those shoes just fine as the co-showrunner of Netflix’s “One Day at a Time.” The Cuban-American producer and writer has been keen on showcasing issues Latino families have to tackle with on a daily basis into her show.

9. Tanya Saracho

Originally a seasoned playwright from Chicago, Tanya Saracho is bringing an authentic voice to the Starz show, Vida, as its executive producer. Her other television credits including working as a writer for Devious Maids, How to Get Away with Murder, Looking, and Girls.


READ: Here Are 9 Latinos Who Have Become Triple Threats In The Entertainment Industry

Which Latinas are helping to write, create and produce the shows, news and TV that you love? Let us know in the comments and share this post with your friends!

These Two Women Shared Their Stories About Traveling And Falling In Love Abroad

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These Two Women Shared Their Stories About Traveling And Falling In Love Abroad

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Booking a flight to another country and immersing yourself in the local culture can give you some serious 😍 eyes. New sights, new sounds, perhaps even new phrases or a new language can all heighten the senses and stir up the heart strings. From a coming-of-age story of love and self acceptance, to realizing that sometimes falling in love abroad is dreamier than moving together abroad, these two women share stories of falling in love in Latin America and with Latinos traveling abroad.

A family friend sparks an incredible romance that helped her move on to her next chapter.

Eleven years ago I was 21 years old and slowly approaching what I have jokingly referred to as my “quarter life crisis”. Since I had not attended college, I found myself dissatisfied with my fallen-into career. I also had now outgrown my only relationship, which stemmed from high school. Feeling lost, I was anxiously trying to find my way. It was during a family trip to Mexico upon arrival at a party, that I saw my father’s closest friend, Jorge and his son Eduardo. It had been years since I last saw them. When I was younger I enjoyed visiting Mexico and spending time with Eduardo’s family. Admittedly, I had a small crush. However since he was 5 years older, that’s all it was. He was very attractive and athletic, having excelled competitively in the tennis community. Although we were now both in our 20s, as we talked and caught up I realized that some things really hadn’t changed. Eduardo always reminded me of a young Enrique Iglesias, whose mocha colored skin and bright smile presented a stunning contrast. This combo somehow still made me blush. We exchanged information, and maintained contact once I returned home. Eventually a romance ensued, but more importantly a friendship. We were both excited when he received a job offer in Tijuana, as that meant a two-hour drive versus a two-hour flight. This gave me the opportunity to show him around my hometown of Los Angeles, where we created some great memories. Eventually the romance slowly fizzled down mainly due to our different paths. However, we remain close friends. I hadn’t realized how much my self-esteem was being impacted by my circumstances. In a time where I was beginning to experience self-doubt in my abilities, he provided me with excitement and confidence that sparked the fuse which propelled me into my next chapter.”

—Submitted by *Alexzia

A college fling in Cuba fizzled out while moving to Spain.

Doesn’t everybody? 😉 Fell in love with a Cuban during graduate studies in anthropology in Havana. He had a job offer in Spain. I figured I’d finish my thesis and go teach English in Argentina. His sister suggested I do that in Spain instead, seeing how when you date a Cuban, you kinda date the whole family and they were all headed to Spain eventually. The breakup started right after he got to Madrid, but by then I was getting little job leads and a chance to study journalism there – in Spanish. I went anyway. We ended before my arrival, tried to muster a friendship but it was weird – and also hard, both of us rather alone as immigrants in a foreign country. I would learn through other Cuban connections that lots and lots of relationships don’t survive such migrations, even Cubans with Cubans because the change is so radical. I graduated from El País School of Journalism about a year and a half later. He married and had a baby almost immediately. —Submitted by Julienne


READ: J.Lo And A.Rod *Fall In Love* While PR and DR Brawl On Twitter

Have you ever fallen in love while traveling in Latin America? Share your stories with us!

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