Things That Matter

This Latina Shuts Down Another Latina’s Racism On The Subway

A Chinese-Peruvian Latina stepped in after hearing harassment being hurled on a crowded New York City subway, reported Huffington Post after a video of the incident went viral on Mic.

The attacker, who said she was “from here” and when nudged a bit further, said she was born in Puerto Rico, was audibly angry in the video. You can hear her saying “Why are you here? Why are you in this country if you’re not with us?” to two people she presumed were together. It all played out to me like an action movie:

To me, it all played out like an action movie:

Not unlike Doomsday, this lady was spitting some hot garbage.

One brave subway rider asked her to stop, but was confronted herself as the harasser shouted, “You don’t understand, you’re not even from here!”

That’s when the heroine of our story stepped in. She spoke with conviction and compassion, in both English and Spanish.

via: evilbloggerlady/ Blogspot/ Batman vs Superman Dawn Of Justice/ Warner Bros.

“Is that bigotry I hear? It’s time to intervene!”

All throughout though, the Latina heroine spread a message of love and unity, saying:

We’re here in it together, okay? We’re all in this together. Whether we like what’s going on in the government or not, fuck it, we got to deal with it.”

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credit: Wonder Woman Trailer/ Warner Bros./ Youtube

Swervin’ on that racism, like “nah.”

When asked if she was harassing the victims because they looked Indian and Muslim, the harasser replied “Yes!” At which point in the video you can hear the entire subway collectively sigh at her.

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credit: Wonder Woman/ Warner Bros./ Youtube

“We must continue to fight the hate!”

The original video from Mañanero TV shows the entire altercation:

credit: Mañanero TV/ Youtube

All jokes aside, the larger lesson here is that even in the Latino community, bigotry and xenophobia are present and we should call it out and stamp it out when we can.

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If you’re a young person and catch your family saying stuff that makes your eyes roll, it’s time to start having conversations with them. Don’t wait until they’re on the subway embarrassing you and themselves.

What would you have done in this situation? Share with the links below.

New York State Repeals Police Protecting Law 50-A, Major Victory For Protesters

Things That Matter

New York State Repeals Police Protecting Law 50-A, Major Victory For Protesters

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Protesters have been filling the streets in major American cities across the country. The sustained protests have disrupted life in the cities but they are working and police reform is happening across the country.

New York State repealing Law 50-A is a major win for protesters.

The Back Lives Matter protests have taken over major cities demanding police reform. New York and Louisville, Kentucky both acknowledged the protesters and have started to implement changes.

In Louisville, the city has banned no-knock warrants in honor of Breonna Taylor. The young woman was in her home when the police broke into the wrong house on a no-knock warrant. Taylor’s home was the wrong address and police shot and killed the EMT.

Law 50-A made records on police behavior a secret. It meant that the public did not have access to documented proof of police brutality and discipline. The law is often used by police departments in New York to protect police officers from public demands for information.

The New York state legislature voted on a stalled piece of legislation that reformed that law.

George Floyd’s death has fundamentally changed America unlike any videoed police death before it. The outrage is deeper, louder, bigger, and more resilient. It is clear that America is fed up with the constant barrage of proof of police brutality going unnoticed.

“The silver lining on this incredibly dark cloud is that the sun is finally starting to shine on injustice. Maybe it’s the unmistakable, and in my opinion indisputable, video evidence that we saw a live murder on TV, but it’s done something to the consciousness of America,” said bill sponsor Sen. Jamaal Bailey in a floor speech before the bill passed. “I don’t know if there could be a more meaningful piece of legislation for me and this body because it’s way more than just policy.”

People are giving all of the credit to the protesters who have used their voices to bring about the change they wanted to see.

Thousands of people have braved a deadly pandemic to demand justice for George Floyd and all of the Black men, women, and children killed by police. Even with COVID-19 infecting millions of Americans and killing more than 113,000, Americans are taking to the street for justice.

Activists are grateful for the support and the immediate change it is creating.

People have been fighting for justice for a long time in the U.S. A majority of Americans are on the side of the protesters and are coming around to the idea of reforming the police.

Protesters are not letting up as they see victory after victory. One of the main points of the protesters is reallocating some funds to the police to other resources. Activists are demanding that social workers, community programs, schools, libraries, and other public entities receive the funds. This would lead to fewer police officers answering non-crime calls sparing lives in the process.

READ: This Is What Protesters Actually Mean When They’re Calling For Cities To ‘Defund The Police’

Latinos In New York City Face More Layoffs Than Non-Latino Peers

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Latinos In New York City Face More Layoffs Than Non-Latino Peers

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The country is witnessing a high amount of mass layoffs across several industries in the face of the COVID-19 outbreak. Last week, 3.3 million Americans filed for unemployment, the highest number in history. Economists anticipate a 20 percent unemployment rate in the United States and some cities are already feeling the impact of these layoffs. In New York City, Latinos are facing more layoffs than their peers.

Latinos in New York City are facing higher levels of unemployment caused by COVID-19.

MSNBC Legal Analyst Maya Wiley tweeted about the foreseeable disproportionate impact these layoffs would have on minority communities. The tweet is ringing true as 41 percent of Latinos in NYC have been laid off from their jobs in response to the COVID-19 outbreak.

The Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy of the City University of New York conducted a survey with 1,000 participants. The survey found that roughly 4 out of every 10 Latinos in NYC have lost their job or someone in their household lost their job due to the health crisis. The survey found that 24 percent of white and Asian employees and 15 percent of Black employees reported losing jobs.

“It’s likely because the Hispanic community, many are in service jobs like restaurants or hotels,” Professor Scott Ratzan, a senior scholar at CUNY SPH, who led the survey, said in a statement. “We do the survey in English and Spanish, and [job loss is] higher among the Spanish-speaking community.” 

New York is the hardest-hit state in the U.S. with more than 30,000 confirmed cases of the virus.

New York state is facing the most extreme outbreak of the novel coronavirus when compared to the rest of the country. Governor Andrew Cuomo delivers an address to the media every morning and has told New Yorkers to brace for a serious viral outbreak. More than 30,000 New Yorkers have tested positive for COVID-19 and 325 deaths. Around 20,000 of those cases and about 280 of those deaths are in NYC.

Gov. Cuomo shared data that showed how the measures New York has taken to slow the spread is contributing to a slowing hospitalization rate. According to The New York Times, the hospitalization rate in New York state is slowing. On Sunday, the governor shared stat showing the rate doubling every two days. By Thursday, new data shows the hospitalization rate doubling every 4.7 days.

There are resources available for New Yorkers who are losing their jobs during the outbreak.

Some New Yorkers are reporting some delays in getting a hold of people in the unemployment offices. While the waits are long, it is worth being persistent.

According to NYC Emergency Management, there are several options for people who are being laid off during the COVID-19 pandemic. Unemployment assistance is available to everyone in New York state and the state has waived the 7-day wait period to alleviate the added pressures of COVID-19. Employees should know about the Shared Work program offered as an alternative to worker layoffs that provides some income assistance while workers have to work a reduced schedule.

The Office of Nightlife is also asking nightlife employees to fill out a survey about lost income in an attempt to help contractors, performers, workers, and business owners impacted by the closures.

READ: Latinas Are Sharing How They Protect Their Loved Ones From Coronavirus