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[VIDEO] This Latina Filmed The Racist Who Threatened To Call ICE On Her And Twitter Has Some Opinions

Thanks to camera phones, more and more racists are being exposed while harassing people of color. And the videos are going viral.

The latest in a long string of racist incidents caught on camera is from a 17-year-old Latina in Elk Grove just outside Sacramento, California.

She uploaded video of the incident hoping Twitter could help identify the racist.

Credit: @JamesKosur / Twitter

The 17-year-old, named Ana Jaira Solis, had parked her car at a community park in Elk Grove, California. Apparently, this sent an older man over the edge and he came to confront the teen and told her to move her car.

Solis was able to pull out her phone and capture a now-viral video that features the man criticizing her English and threatening to call the authorities.

The man told the teenager, “take this f*****g car and get the f**k out of here. You park this car here again and I’m going to report you to ICE, you get that?”

When Solis asked the man what she had done wrong, he told her, “You’re f*****g taking a parking spot from a U.S. citizen.” He continued, “The cops are coming, I already called them… you need to move because you don’t belong here. You don’t live here, do you?”

The teenager told the man that she was an American Citizen and that she lives in Elk Grove. The man did not believe her and responded, “You barely speak English.”

According to several news reports, the man is no stranger to the police.

Credit: @JamesKosur

And apparently, he had been harassing several other people at the park that day. But police would not elaborate.

Much of Latino Twitter was really shocked to see that the guy appeared to be Latino himself.

Police didn’t comment on the man’s ethnicity but that didn’t stop Twitter from wondering why a Latino man would attack a Latina for her accent or why he’d threaten to call immigration on her.

Like why is he coming for a Latina…?

Some pointed out that internalized racism is a real thing – especially in our ongoing political climate where immigrants and people of color are so demonized.

Other’s were poking holes in his story that made ZERO sense.

Like how are you going to tell someone this is public land and then demand they leave…? I mean that makes absolutely no sense.

But mostly, people just wanted to tell Ana that she wasn’t alone and that the community has got her back.

Credit: @anajairaaaa / Twitter

Having an out of control man yelling and screaming at you when you’ve done absolutely nothing wrong has got to be terrifying. Unfortunately, it’s not the first case and probably not the last one either but bravo Ana for staying calm and sharing your story.

READ: [VIDEO] This Latino Captured Racist Assault Of Subway Rider On Video, Then Detained Her Until Police Showed Up

A Deadly Virus Is Back With A Vengeance And It’s Hitting Our Farmworker Community The Hardest

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A Deadly Virus Is Back With A Vengeance And It’s Hitting Our Farmworker Community The Hardest

UNM / Instagram

Farmworkers face dangerous and even life-threatening conditions each and every day they’re at work. It’s a seriously difficult job to do but so many of our country’s most at-risk people are the ones doing it.

Our nation’s farmworkers face discrimination, refusal of payment, immigration crackdowns, physical injury, and now – according to an NBC report – an outbreak of valley fever.

This outbreak of valley fever has the potential to be deadly for farmworkers.

Credit: @NBCNews / Twitter

A new NBC News report details the story of Victor Gutierrez, who contracted valley fever, a dangerous fungal disease. Victor was suffering from flu-like symptoms – coughing, night sweats, exhaustion, and a strange feeling that he was burning up on the inside. He ignored the symptoms and kept working so that he wouldn’t lose his job but eventually the illness caught up with him and he was struggling to breathe.

The next day, Gutierrez’s lungs filled up with fluid and he felt so sick that he went to a local clinic. This time, they tested him for valley fever, and it came back positive.

He told NBC News: “The nurse called me and told me to rush to the clinic because it was an emergency.” They told him he might only have six months to live.

While Gutierrez managed to beat those odds by taking the antifungal medication fluconazole for more than a year, he has seen valley fever kill many other people he’s known.

The worst of the valley fever outbreak is happening where nearly two-thirds of our nuts and fruits come from – putting a huge amount of workers at risk along with our economy.

Credit: @NBCNews / Twitter

In California, rates of new cases rose 10 percent in just one year. The state budget has $8 million for valley fever research, while about $3 million will go to the Valley Fever Institute at Kern Medical Center, in the heart of the growing threat.

These figures pale in comparison to the actual costs associated with valley fever. In 2011, California spent approximately $2.2 billion in valley fever-related hospital expenses.

Climate change has been singled out as a possible cause for the outbreaks.

Credit: @NBCNews / Twitter

Coccidioidomycosis or cocci (pronounced “coxy”), the fungus that causes valley fever, thrives in dry, undisturbed soil. It becomes airborne when that soil is disturbed – whether it’s by dirt bikes, construction crews, or farmers putting in a new fruit or nut orchard. It can travel on the wind as far as 75 miles away. Years of climate change-fueled drought and a 240 percent increase in dust storms appear to have led to a swift rise in the number of people diagnosed with the illness across the Southwest.

Adding to the threat of valley fever is that 49% of farmworkers are undocumented and unlikely to seek medical care for fear of deportation.

Credit: @NBCNews / Twitter

Like 68 percent of the estimated 800,000 farmworkers in California, Gutierrez was born in Mexico. An estimated 49 percent of the state’s farmworkers lack work authorization and most live under the federal poverty line in unincorporated communities with few public services.

Undocumented residents are far less likely to visit a doctor or a hospital, even for urgent medical care. This puts an already at-risk group of people at greater risk of health complications.

Other’s are forced to make a choice between eating or medicine.

Like many farmworkers who contract the illness, Gutierrez found the cost of the antifungal medication needed to treat valley fever totally unaffordable. At the height of the illness, it cost $1,200 for two months of pills because he had to take two to three times as many as one would if they were treating a typical candida infection.

He didn’t have insurance at the time and said his family often had to choose between food and his medication. He still isn’t able to work regularly and his family mainly survives on the money his wife, Maria, makes in the fields.

People took to Twitter to worry about what this meant for the state and its farmworkers.

Credit: @NBCNews / Twitter

With more than 800,000 at-risk farmworkers, people who work in the fields to help deliver foods to plates across the country, this is an urgent problem.

Valley fever could leave large groups of the community unable to work.

While some offered up first-hand experience on their battle with valley fever.

Credit: @NBCNews / Twitter

Although valley fever is often mild with no symptoms, it has the potential to be deadly – especially in at-risk groups. Symptoms include fatigue, cough, fever, night sweats and can progress to painful skin lesions and fluid-filled lungs.

Thankfully, vaccines are in the works but they won’t be a silver bullet.

Credit: @NBCNews / Twitter

Two vaccines are in the works – at the University of Texas and the University of Arizona – but it’s not clear how close they are to being tested on humans.

Three members of Congress from the Southwest last month introduced a federal bill, the FORWARD Act, in an effort to increase public awareness of the disease while “promoting the development of novel treatments and a vaccine.”

While D.C. Debates Reparations, California Governor Issues The Long Overdue Apology Indigenous People Have Long Awaited

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While D.C. Debates Reparations, California Governor Issues The Long Overdue Apology Indigenous People Have Long Awaited

@ajplus | Twitter

Earlier this week, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell issued an appalling statement about reparations toward the African-American community. Reparations are “the making of amends for a wrong one has done, by paying money to or otherwise helping those who have been wronged.” He said that the U.S. should not be responsible for something the country did 150 years ago. While he was bashed on social media for having such an oppressive view about Black people and slavery in the country, we’d like for him to take into account the eloquent speech that was also delivered by a more compassionate politician.

On Tuesday, Gov. Gavin Newsome said he was sorry on behalf of California to the Native American people for how the state wronged them.

The governor spoke at a ceremony at the California Indian Heritage Center near Sacramento. He was alongside tribal leaders who were there for a new commission that will benefit their community.

“It’s called a genocide,” Newsom said, according to the Sacramento Bee. “No other way to describe it… I’m sorry on behalf of the state of California.” He added, “We can never undo the wrongs inflicted on the peoples who have lived on this land that we now call California since time immemorial, but we can work together to build bridges, tell the truth about our past and begin to heal deep wounds.”

Newsome has launched the Truth and Healing Council “to produce a report before the end of 2024 on the historical relationship between the state and Native Americans.”

Tribal leaders that attended the event said they were grateful to hear words of acknowledgment and also said they are ready to know how this council will produce action.

“It’s healing to hear your words, but actions will speak for themselves, and I do look forward to hearing more and seeing more of you,” Erica Pinto, chairwoman of Jamul Indian Village in San Diego County, said according to Reuters.

In 1851, California’s first governor, Peter Burnett said the chilling words in an address “That a war of extermination will continue to be waged between the races until the Indian race becomes extinct must be expected.”

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