Things That Matter

Julián Castro Is Backing Sen. Elizabeth Warren For President, Now Many Are Wondering If She Will Pick Him As Her VP

Last year, a large number of Democrats came forward to announce they’d be seeking to run for the President of the United States in 2020. Now, a couple of months later, and after several debates, many of the candidates have dropped out. Today, in the New Year, we now have 14 Democrats seeking to unseat President Donald Trump. You’re probably wondering why we still have 14 Democrats running for president when many have dropped out. The reason is more new candidates are jumping in the race, but do we really need so many presidential hopefuls? No. So, one of those that candidates that sadly left the President’s race are supporting a top contender, and here’s why it’s so crucial now. 

Last week, Julián Castro announced he was dropping out of the presidential race. Now, Castro said he is fully endorsing Sen. Elizabeth Warren.

Castro posted his endorsement on Twitter, which was accompanied by a video. Castro began his statement by saying that his success can be attributed to the strong women in his life. 

“Elizabeth and I share a vision of America, where everyone counts. An America where people⁠—not the wealthy or well-connected⁠—are put first. I’m proud to join her in the fight for big, structural change,” Castro tweeted. 

He added in his video, “There’s one candidate I see who is unafraid to fight like hell to make sure that America’s promise will be there for everyone. [Sen. Warren] will make sure that no matter where you live in America — or where your family came from in the world, you have a path to opportunity, too.”

His statement comes at a critical time because while 14 candidates are still in the race, so far, only three Democrats prove to be bringing big money through their fundraising efforts. 

Credit: @MoogleSpace / Twitter

As we noted, Sen. Bernie Sanders has raised the most money out of all the Democratic candidates with $34.5 million. In second was former Mayor Pete Buttigieg, who raised more than $24.7 million. Former President Joe Biden raised $22.7 million. Sen. Elizabeth Warren raised $21.2 million, and entrepreneur Andrew Yang raised more than $16.5 million. The rest of the candidates, while many, are falling through the wayside, and it’s also the reason Castro had to drop out. 

What Castro lacked in funds, he made up for in support. Many thought his campaign was the first to bring forth actual policy change on immigration, border security, and environmental rights — so his opinion matters much. But his endorsement could leave some confused about which candidate is the right one for them.

Credit: @JeanPodrasky / Twitter

Several politicians have a strong following, and while they are not running for President in 2020, have voiced their support for presidential candidates. People around the country are seeking their opinion as to who the best candidate currently is. 

For example, fans of Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez know that she is backing Sen. Sanders, as is Rep. Ilhan Omar. As far as Sen. Warren is concerned, besides Castro, Rep. Raúl Grijalva and Rep. Ayanna Pressley, are also supporting her. Biden has the most support from Democrats in Congress. 

Some speculated that Castro’s endorsement came soon after his announcement that he was dropping out because there’s no time like the present. 

“Castro + Warren’s policy teams had mutual affection early in the race, as both ran plan-focused campaigns,” a CNN reporter tweeted. “The candidates praised each other publicly. If there’s any surprise, it’s that he endorsed so quickly after dropping out, but Warren needs energy now.” 

Warren did thank Castro for his endorsement, and who knows, maybe she’ll choose him as her running mate?

Credit: @adamcbest / Twitter

We won’t get our hopes up just yet, but if Warren continues her positive stride toward the Presidential office, choosing Castro to be her VP would get her a lot of brownie points. And, yes, people on social media are already imagining this dream team as Hollywood actors Annette Bening and Oscar Isaac (see tweet above). 

The senator expressed her gratitude over his endorsement on Twitter, saying, “Thank you, @JulianCastro! You’ve been a powerful voice for bold, progressive change, and I’m honored to have your support. Together, we’ll fight to make sure every single family in America has a path to opportunity.”

READ: His Campaign Is Over But Julian Castro Has A Bright Future In The Democratic Party

Bernie Sanders Faces Backlash For Saying That Not ‘Everything Is Bad’ In Castro’s Cuba

Things That Matter

Bernie Sanders Faces Backlash For Saying That Not ‘Everything Is Bad’ In Castro’s Cuba

berniesanders / Instagram

Democratic presidential candidate Bernie Sanders is once again touting what he sees as the benefits of Fidel Castro’s Cuba. The Vermont senator first made comments praising parts of Castro’s Cuba in a 1985 interview. Now, 15 years later, Sen. Sanders is standing behind his idea that not everything is bad in Cuba in a 60 Minutes interview.

Senator Bernie Sanders is facing backlash from critics after his 60 Minutes interview because of his comments on Fidel Castro’s Cuba.

In the 1980s, Sen. Sanders was caught on camera more than once praising parts of the Castro regime in Cuba. He points to the health care and education systems as parts of the government that works for Cuban people. The comments resurfaced in 2019 and caused a backlash against the senator in the Cuban diaspora, whose pains are still fresh from the overthrow of the government.

Now, in a “60 Minutes” interview, the Vermont senator has doubled down on his comments that some of the Cuban government is good.

Anderson Cooper – “What is Democratic Socialism?”

Bernie Sanders – “When Donald Trump was a private businessman in New York, he got $800 million in tax breaks and subsidies to build luxury housing. That’s called Socialism. What Democratic Socialism is about is saying, ‘Let’s use the federal government to protect the interest of working families.’”

BS – “We’re very opposed to the authoritarian nature of Cuba. But, you know, it’s simply unfair to say that everything is bad. You know, when Fidel Castro came into office, you know what he did? He had a massive literacy program. Is that a bad thing, even though Fidel Castro did it?”

AC – “There were a lot of dissidents imprisoned in Cuba.”

BS – “That’s right and we condemn that. Unlike Donald Trump, let’s be clear. I do not think that Kim Jung Un is a good friend. I don’t trade love letters with a murdering dictator. Vladimir Putin, not a great friend of mine.”

The comments have sparked some backlash on social media from Cubans and Cuban-Americans.

Credit: @marcorubio / Twitter

Senator Marco Rubio, who is Cuban-American, has been a vocal opponent of Socialism. He has used the crisis in Venezuela to solidify his point about the dangers of the government system he believes Sen. Sanders wants to start in the U.S. Yet, Sen. Sanders’s point is not that the Castro regime is good. In the “60 Minutes” interview, the senator made it clear that he does not support the Castro regime and the brutality it caused for the Cuban people. However, he does believe there are things we can learn from the Caribbean island about offering health care and education to the population.

One point of contention with the senator’s comments is that the Cuban people didn’t fight back because of the new programs.

Credit: @DebbieforFL / Twitter

The Castro regime is known to have oppressed dissidents and political opponents. Speaking out against the authoritarian regime was not safe. People were jailed, killed, and exiled for standing up to Castro’s rise to power. Families fled the island and settled around the world to escape what they saw as a justifiable threat to their lives and sovereignty.

Some people are sharing personal stories of their families’ treatment under the Castro regime.

Credit: @GiancarloSopo / Twitter

The generational trauma created by the Castro regime is still felt today. Some people used Sen. Sanders’s comments as a chance to tell a fuller story of the government some have praised for their social services.

A clip of President Barack Obama speaking on the same social issues in Cuba is also circulating.

President Obama worked tirelessly to reopen relations between the U.S. and Cuba. He was the first sitting president to visit the island when it was announced that diplomatic ties were reopened between the two countries. Part of being able to open those relations was eliminating the “wet foot, dry foot” policy that allowed Cuban nationals to stay in the U.S. after migrating. This allowed Cubans to be deported back to Cuba, something that hadn’t happened since Cubans first started to flee their homeland. In response, Cubans illegally in the U.S. have been subjected to ICE raids and detention for the first time because of President Donald Trump’s increasing escalation against the immigrant community.

There is a lot of concern from Democratic supporters that the comment could cost the party Florida in the general election if Sen. Sanders is nominated.

Credit: @IvanBrandon / Twitter

The Cuban and Cuban-American population in Florida is a key demographic to win the state in general elections. His comments cherry-picking what is and is not good about the Cuban government is having a resonating effect in Florida. Cuban Democrats and Republicans in the state are untied in rebuking the senator’s comments as glossing over the true victimization and terror millions faced.

READ: Bernie Sanders Praises Fidel Castro And His Revolution In Cuba During Resurfaced Interview From 1985

Democratic Candidates Joined Forces To Call Out Former Republican Mayor Mike Bloomberg’s Recent Past

Things That Matter

Democratic Candidates Joined Forces To Call Out Former Republican Mayor Mike Bloomberg’s Recent Past

elizabethwarren / mikebloomberg / Instagram

The Democratic candidates met in Las Vegas for the 10th Democratic Debate. Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders, Massachusetts Senator Elizabeth Warren, Minnesota Senator Amy Klobuchar, former South Bend Mayor Pete Buttigieg, former Vice President Joe Biden, and former New York Mayor Mike Bloomberg took the stage in a heated debate ranging from income inequality to immigration. But the biggest focus was Bloomberg’s record of racial profiling and income hoarding.

Last night was the 10th Democratic debate in Las Vegas and Senator Elizabeth Warren started off with a dig against Mike Bloomberg.

“I’d like to talk about who we are running against, a billionaire who calls women fat broads and horse-faced lesbians,” Sen. Warren said at the beginning of the debate. “And, no, I’m not talking about Donald Trump. I’m talking about Mayor Bloomberg. Democrats are not going to win if we have a nominee who has a history of hiding his tax returns, of harassing women, and of supporting racist policies like redlining and stop and frisk.”

Sen. Warren that she is prepared to support whoever wins the nomination but warned about the dangers of electing Bloomberg. She added: “Democrats take a huge risk if we just substitute one arrogant billionaire for another. This country has worked for the rich for a long time and left everyone else in the dirt.”

Former Vice President Joe Biden joined Sen. Warren in calling out Bloomberg.

“Let’s get something straight. The reason that stop and frisk changed is because Barack Obama sent moderators to see what was going on. When we sent there to say that this practice has to stop, the mayor thought it was a terrible idea that we send them there. A terrible idea,” Biden told the audience. “Let’s get the facts straight. Let’s get the order straight. It’s not whether he apologized or not, it’s the policy. The policy was abhorrent and it was, in fact, a violation of every right people have and we are the ones, our administration, sent people in to moderate it and at the very same time, the mayor argued against that.”

Biden added that Bloomberg didn’t come up with the idea of ending the policy on his own. Bloomberg was forced to end the policy because of outside legal and political pressure.

Bloomberg argued back that his record on criminal justice is no different in its ability to determine the right course of action.

“I’ve sat. I’ve apologized. I’ve asked for forgiveness. But the bottom line is that we stopped too many people and we’ve got to make sure that we do something about criminal justice in this country,” Bloomberg argued. “There’s no great answer to a lot of these questions and if we took off everybody who was wrong on this panel, everybody that was wrong on criminal justice at some time in their career, there’d be nobody else up here.” 

Bloomberg’s history of making women sign non-disclosure agreements after filing complaints against him also came up.

Sen. Warren took aim at Bloomberg’s long history of sexual harassment and gender discrimination hidden behind non-disclosure agreements.

“I hope you heard what his defense was, ‘I’ve been nice to some women.’ That just doesn’t cut it,” Sen. Warren said after Bloomberg told the audience that he’s given some women top jobs in his organizations. “The mayor has to stand on his own record and what we need to know is exactly what’s lurking out there. He has gotten some number of women, dozens, who knows, to sign non-disclosure agreements both for sexual harassment and gender discrimination in the workplace. So, Mr. Mayor, are you willing to release all of those women from those non-disclosure agreements so we can hear their side of the story?”

Bloomberg answered Sen. Warren claiming that the non-disclosure agreements are mainly because “maybe some of them didn’t like a joke I told.” Bloomberg further argued that the women wanted to sign the non-disclosure agreements and that “we’ll live with it.”

Bloomberg’s comment about women not liking his joke was met with boos and groans of disapproval from the shocked audience.

Sen. Warren also made sure to include that Bloomberg blamed the housing crisis on minorities.

During the housing crisis, Sen. Warren held hearing to figure out what was happening that forced millions of Americans from their homes. At the same time, Bloomberg was blaming Latinos and African-Americans for causing the housing crash.

What do you think about Mike Bloomberg’s record with minority communities?

READ: Michael Bloomberg Apologizes For Stop-And-Frisk Policy But A Racially-Charged Audio Clip Shows A Different Side