Things That Matter

Judge Reverses Innocence Verdict Striking Down Precedent Of Rare Legal Principle

The Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court has reversed Aaron Hernandez’s innocent verdict in connection to the murder of Odin Lloyd. In 2017, Superior Court Judge E. Susan Garsh cleared the former NFL Patriots star of all charges in the murder case in which he was convicted and sentenced to life in prison.

By committing suicide when he did, Aaron Hernandez’s appeal was thrown out, according to the highest court in Massachusetts.

Getty

After being acquitted of a double murder, and with his previous conviction in appeals when he died, legally speaking, Hernandez had died an innocent man, according to a Massachusetts legal principle called “abatement ab initio.” Martin W. Healy, chief legal counsel to the Massachusetts Bar Association, told the Boston Globe that “ab initio” means “from the beginning.” The rule says that if someone dies before using up all their legal appeals, their legal standing goes back to what it was at the start “as if the trial and conviction never happened.”

However, now CNN reports that the Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court has ruled that “abatement ab initio” is “outdated and no longer consonant with the circumstances of contemporary life, if, in fact, it ever was.” This means that Hernandez is officially guilty of the murder of Odin and will be posthumously recognized as guilty.

According to the Globe, Bristol D.A. prosecutor, Thomas M. Quinn III, planned to appeal the ruling, saying, “He died a guilty man and a convicted murderer. This fact is indisputable … You can’t just snap your fingers and have that go away.”

In a Bristol County Superior Court legal filing in 2017, Hernandez’s suicide note to his fiancé, Shayanna Jenkins, was on full display. In it, Hernandez told her that he gave her an ominous heads up, writing “I told you what was coming indirectly.” It’s hard to say exactly what he told her “indirectly.” Was it that he was indeed going to commit suicide? Or, had he told her he’d do whatever he had to do in order to leave his family set up financially? Or something different altogether?

This is a copy of Hernandez’s suicide note that was made public with the filing.

Credit: Bristol Superior Court

The tone of the note is in stark contrast to the events that were about to unfold. He wrote lovingly to his fiancé, calling her an “angel – literally!” He asked her to take care of his friends and family and even writes to her “(You’re Rich),” presumably to reassure her that she’ll be able to afford it. Hernandez ended the letter by mentioning what appears to be their song: Savage Garden’s “I Knew I Loved You.”

After writing the note and two others, he presumably opened his bible to John 3:16, wrote “John 3:16” on his forehead in red marker, made red marks on his hands, blocked the entry to his cell, stripped to his bare body, wet and soaped the floor to make it less likely that he’d be able to back out of what he was about to do next: hang himself in his jail cell.

It really does boggle the mind, that someone about to do what he did, could write an even-handed note, with penmanship better than mine, and take all the necessary steps in such a methodical way to end their life.

The family of Odin Lloyd, who Hernandez is convicted of killing, praised the judicial system for giving them justice.

READ: Aaron Hernandez’s Secrets Are All Coming To The Light After His Suicide

Notice any needed corrections? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com

Gloria Estefan Reveals She Contemplated Suicide In Her Teens In Episode of ‘Red Table Talk: The Estefans’

Things That Matter

Gloria Estefan Reveals She Contemplated Suicide In Her Teens In Episode of ‘Red Table Talk: The Estefans’

Photo: Lars Niki/Getty Images

In an emotional “Red Table Talk: The Estefans” episode, Gloria Estefan opened up about a particularly dark time in her life.

In the special episode dedicated to mental health, Estefan revealed to her daughter, Emily and her niece, Lili, that she once contemplated suicide as a teenager.

“I’ve always felt very good in my own skin, except when I was fifteen, and my dad had already spent a year at home and I was taking care of him. And he was heading downhill fast,” she explained on RTT.

Photo: Red Table Talk: The Estefans/ Facebook Watch

Estefan went on to describe how her mental health crisis was largely due to her father’s declining emotional state and physical health after he returned from fighting in the Vietnam War.

“Even though my father survived the Vietnam War, he still became a casualty of combat,” she said. “His exposure to ‘Agent Orange’–a poison used for warfare–resulted in his diagnosis of multiple sclerosis.”

According to Estefan, being a teenaged girl having to take care of her sick father took a deep emotional toll on her.

“He lost his ability to speak, he couldn’t walk, he would stand up to try to go to the bathroom and he would fall and he would soil himself,” she said. “I would have to bathe him. He would be crying, embarrassed. And trying to make me feel better. That’s what would kill me.”

She also explained that she didn’t want to burden her loved ones with her painful feelings. “I didn’t want to tell my mother that I was starting to feel cracks in my armor. I didn’t want to tell my grandmother because I didn’t want to worry her,” she said.

Estefan was visibly emotional as she told her daughter and niece that she even had specific fantasies about taking her own life–which is one of the major warning signs of a suicidal person.

“I knew where [my father’s] gun was and I started having desperation thoughts,” she said. “I remember going to the place thinking, okay the gun is there, but what if instead I hang myself because that might be bloody? I had even picked out the tree that I might do it on.” Her daughter Lili looked distressed as Estefan recounted this painful time in her life.

Estefan says what “got her through” her suicidal episode was “thinking of other people that she loved” and how they would react to living without her. “I took myself through the whole process [of what would happen afterward],” she said. “I think it helped, for me, to imagine what life was going to be like forever for the people that I loved.”

After she got through this dark emotional period, Estefan said she got her life back by “focusing on school” and eventually meeting her husband, Emilio, which also helped bring her out of her depression.

The powerful episode aired on Wednesday and includes special guests Karla Souza and Lele Pons who also talk about their mental health battles. You can watch it on Facebook Watch here.

If you or someone you love is depressed or contemplating suicide, please don’t hesitate to call 1-800-273-TALK (8255) at any time for support.

Notice any needed corrections? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com

Aaron Hernandez’s Fiancée Opens Up About Netflix’s Speculation Over The Football Player’s Sexuality

Entertainment

Aaron Hernandez’s Fiancée Opens Up About Netflix’s Speculation Over The Football Player’s Sexuality

“Killer Inside: The Mind Of Aaron Hernandez” is a new Netflix docu-series that explores the life of late football player Aaron Hernandez. The docu-series has sparked a lot of controversy over how the director explored Hernandez’s sexuality. Now, his family members are finally speaking out.

Aaron Hernandez’s brother spoke with Dr. Oz about the documentary highlighting his brother’s brain injuries.

Jonathan Hernandez was asked to help with the Netflix docu-series but turned down the offer because he didn’t feel right about it. However, he does think some part of the docu-series are important.

“I think there’s so much tragedy within this and things that can be gained for other people’s benefit that the dollar amount was the least significant thing,” Jonathan told Dr. Oz. “It’s more so what was at hand and what can we collectively do so someone who is growing up isn’t in this situation in the near future or down the road.”

Aaron’s fiancée also opened up about the docu-series and the tragedy surrounding Aaron.

Shayanna Jenkins also confirms that Netflix approached her for the docu-series and offered her compensation but she didn’t want to participate. Instead, she wanted to keep moving forward with her life.

“If he did feel that way or if he felt the urge, I wish that I — I was told,” Jenkins told ABC. “And I wish that he — you know, he would’ve told me ’cause I wouldn’t — I would not have loved him any differently. I would have understood. It’s not shameful and I don’t think anybody should be ashamed of who they are inside, regardless of who they love. I think it’s a beautiful thing, I just wish I was able to tell him that.”

Fans of Aaron are upset with the docu-series and how they handled themselves in the making of the show.

A lot of the show talks about Aaron’s perceived sexuality and how it factored into his crimes. The docu-series has been criticized for bringing up a very sensitive subject when Aaron is not around to defend himself.

The obsession with his sexuality is really upsetting people.

There is nothing wrong with someone’s sexuality. However, to attach a sexuality to a person who is dead is a low blow.

Out of all the noise surrounding Aaron, one person is being praised for their resilience.

Credit: @versaceclip / Twitter

What do you think about the docu-series about Aaron Hernandez and his life?

READ: New Investigative Report Reveals Aaron Hernandez’s Gay Relationship And His Erratic Behavior With NFL Players

Notice any needed corrections? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com