Things That Matter

Juanes Posts On Instagram To Show Solidarity With Venezuelan Protestors In “Mother Of All Marches”

No stranger to political activism, Juanes’ mind was on the people of Venezuela today. The Colombian rocker posted an a cappella rendition of the classic Venezuelan folk song “Tonada de Luna Llena” to his Instagram, writing in the caption “Hoy me desperté pensando en ti Venezuela, llevándote siempre en mi corazón. #venezuela #simondiaz” “Today I awake with Venezuela on my mind, I carry you in my heart always.”


Juanes took to Instagram Wednesday to show solidarity with the people of Venezuela as violence broke out during protests.

As indicated by the hashtag, the song’s original writer and singer was the universally loved “el tio Simon,” Simón Díaz, who had a long illustrious career centered around Venezuelan folk music. Even when Díaz began working in film and TV, promoting Venezuelan music and the people and prosperity of Venezuela was important to him.


Henrique Capriles, Governor of Miranda and figurehead of the opposition to President Nicolás Maduro, also posted the video, thanking Juanes for keeping Venezuela in mind during these politically charged times.

The governor’s account was active throughout the day as protests went on in the streets. A a major point of contention between the people and the government is that Maduro has banned Capriles from running for political office for 15 years (until 2032), due to an alleged misuse of government funds which Capriles has denied.


Juanes’ message comes on the heels of massive protests occurring in Venezuela, which has as of late been swamped in financial and political strife.

With a food crisis on their hands and political turmoil at a fever pitch, the people and the government have been at war in the streets. CNN reported that today protestors marched to fight what they see as President Maduro’s dictatorship. In recent months, Maduro has delayed state and local elections and continues to halt attempts to remove him from power.


This protestor clashed with Maduro’s forces and refused to move.

“Pure Venezuelan dignity” said @MariaCorinaYA of the protestor, reminding us all of another powerful moment of protest.


 Juanes wasn’t the only celebrity to chime in and stand with the people of  Venezuela. J. Balvin posted on Instagram in solidarity as well.

VENEZUELA !!!! SOLO BUENA VIBRA!!! LOS AMAMOS !!!

A post shared by J Balvin (@jbalvin) on

“Venezuela! Only good vibes! We love you all!” the reggaetón superstar said on his personal Instagram account.


A peaceful resolution to the ongoing conflict in Venezuela seems hard to achieve right now.

A post shared by Don Ocioso? ? (@don_ocioso) on

We all hope for a peaceful resolution for the Venezuelan people, but with this level of protest and fighting in the streets, it looks like that may be far off.


[H/T] ‘Mother of All Marches’ Turns Violent in Venezuela

READ: Fed Up Venezuelans Unite Nationwide To Tell Maduro They’ve Had Enough


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Latinas Are Forcing Themselves To Examine How They Are Showing Up For The Black Community

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Latinas Are Forcing Themselves To Examine How They Are Showing Up For The Black Community

Eze Amos / Getty

Months have passed since the deaths of Breonna Taylor and George Floyd but members of the Black community continue to fight against police brutality. While news reports of protests might have slowed down, it’s important to know that showing up for Black people has so much power.

Recently, we asked Latinas “How are we showing up for our Black brothers and sisters?” and the answers were pretty humbling.

Recognize the relative privileges we have

“This week has been so, so heavy, but we need to ask ourselves how we are showing up for the Black community outside of the weeks when headlines are grim and cities are on fire. How are we showing up for Black people in our everyday lives? 365 days a year? I am speaking specifically to my community here: [Non-Black] Latinxs, we have so far to go when it comes to protecting the dignity of our own people, I know. I know our people are also hurting. But we HAVE to recognize the relative privileges we have and the ways in which the Black community’s freedom is directly tied to our own. We all deserve dignity. We all deserve the ability to move through the world without fearing for our lives. Some of us haven’t ever had to worry about that—so what are we doing to help those who do worry for their safety and the safety of loved ones every single day? Please pay attention. Please speak out and hold the people in your life accountable. We are ALL responsible. We all need to be doing more—no matter our race or ethnicity. Please, let’s take care of each other.” – @ludileiva

Show up to protests

“Showing up to local peaceful protests and talking to my family and friends about how we need to stand together. It is my hope our black brothers and sisters will stand with us when we have to face our government on DACA and caged children.” – lil_yo11

Donate and give

“Definitely by donating, signing petitions, educating others on issues like this that affect the black community, posting about it, and speaking out when it happens. Our voices and actions definitely need to be heard during this time.”- belleza_xoxo

Continue to fight

“Many of us ARE. And we need to do even MORE. This hurts me because although there is colorism out there, there are also respectful and supporting people who want to do more and more. I hope more people saw that too. Anyways, my family and I will continue fighting strong for this movement. Because BLACK LIVES MATTER. THEY SURELY DO.” – mid.nicole

Hold others accountable

“By holding people accountable. By talking about privilege even if it makes people uncomfortable! Becoming part of the conversation because if you don’t and look the other way you are part of the problem. Make people uncomfortable! Make people realize that our system needs to be redone so justice can be served for our fallen brothers. Being black, being of color shouldn’t be a death sentence.” – koayafilm

Connect with others

“We are each other’s hope 🙏🏽 sharing on your story is great, but never forget the power of human connection. talk to people, have these conversations & hear the pain, empathy & hope in our voices.”- raquelmariaquintana

Educate ourselves and our families

“We show solidarity! There’s still so much racism within our own Latino community over darker skin color. I know because my abuela was Afro Latina.Things need to change. We need to educate our own families about racism. We need to sign petitions, donating, having conversations. I see many people quiet about what’s going on.” – angieusc7

Keep certain words out of your mouth

“Well we could start by abolishing the expressions “negro” y “negra” as a form of endearment to call for someone of dark complexion. I know some will say it’s a form of endearment, but it just degrades the person called upon by only identifying them by their skin colour. You are calling them by their complexion and therefore reducing a whole persons existence and achievements by the colour of their skin.” –christian.aaby

Hold your family accountable

“We have to stand up for each other especially during these times. I’m confronting my own family members who are getting away from the truth. We have to stand up for what we believe not speak negatively about what the reactions are.” – jenmarasc

Create posters for protests

“Creating posters to take to my local police department this Sunday to protest. Signed petition, called the DA, sent cards to the mayor and DA in support of their efforts and demanding criminalization!!! We need to speak louder. Getting involved in my community to provide breath work and yoga to the black community I live in!!” – mexicanameg

St. Louis Protesters Return To The Area Where A White Couple Drew Guns At Activists

Things That Matter

St. Louis Protesters Return To The Area Where A White Couple Drew Guns At Activists

Michael B. Thomas / Getty

In another display of a peaceful protests, activists returned the site of a St. Louis mansion owned by the white couple who drew out their guns during a calm demonstration last month. On Friday, chanting protesters returned to the home of Patricia and Mark McClosky, stopping just outside of their gate to protest for nearly 15 minutes.

During the peaceful protest over a dozen men in plain clothes walked the area inside of the gate.

According to Time Magazine, “One protester briefly straddled an iron gate as if he was going to jump over, but did not. No one threw anything and no one behind the gates showed aggression. One man on the McCloskeys’ balcony clapped along with the chanting protesters.” The crowd of protesters included a racially diverse crowd carrying signs calling to “Defund the Police” and underlining that “Black Lives Matter” and “No Justice, No Peace.” Chants included calls like “when Black lives are under attack, what do we do? Stand up, fight back,” and “this is what democracy looks like.”

According to reports, it is unknown if the McCloskeys were home. Soon after, the protestors left and marched to Interstate 64. Police had closed off the roads to traffic in both directions to allow protestors to march onto the highway. There the protestors sat on the highway for several minutes to honor the life of George Floyd who died on May 25 after a white police officer pressed his knee to his neck for over eight minutes.

The recent rally was organized by the group Expect Us and is among various demonstrations in St. Louis that have taken place in the weeks since George Floyd’s death in Minneapolis.

The McCloskeys first came to national attention in mid-June after they had been spotted aiming guns at protesters outside their home in St. Louis. Soon after the images of them began circulating Twitter dubbed them “Ken and Karen” and the stars of the “Mr. and Mrs. Smith” remake no one asked for. The incident occurred as protesters marched their way towards the home of Mayor Lyda Krewson who declared in a Facebook post that she would not support rising calls to defund the police. She also reportedly shared activists’ full names and addresses while reading off suggestions on how to better spend the city’s funds. After users ridiculed her online, Krewson apologized for her actions saying “Never did I intend to harm anyone or cause distress,” Krewson tweeted. “The update is removed and again, I apologize.”