Things That Matter

Journalist Found Dead In Mexico, Becomes 12th Killed This Year, After Criticizing Local Authorities

There is terrible news out of Mexico where the body of journalist Nevith Condés Jaramillo was found dead on the evening of August 24 in a home in the municipality of Tejupilco. Condes was a well-known journalist in the state who ran the local news site, El Observatorio del Sur, and was also an announcer on a community radio station. Reports say that Condes was found dead as a result of being stabbed multiple times, according to state prosecutor who made the announcement on Saturday. The murder case is currently being treated as a homicide as investigators look for any suspects. 

The 42-year-old would publish stories and news reports that caused tensions with the local government, this resulted in various threats back in June and November. Condes would eventually request federal protection because of these ongoing threats but reportedly didn’t comply with some procedures due to certain bureaucratic procedures involved. He becomes the third journalist killed in Mexico this August and the twelfth journalist killed in the country this year alone, according to Mexico’s human rights watchdog. 

The killing adds to a growing list of reporter deaths in one of the world’s most dangerous countries for the press.

Credit: @drconsultores / Twitter

The Mexican National Human Rights Commission (CNDH) denounced the killing of Condes in a public statement. The organization is calling for an independent and thorough investigation into this latest death.

“Violence against journalists, in all its forms, is one of the main obstacles for our country to consolidate itself as a democracy, hence the need for the authorities of the three levels of government to focus on the prevention, protection and timely investigation of these facts, the statement said. “With this homicide, there are already 153 journalists killed since 2000, and 12 so far in 2019.”

As of now, human rights defenders are asking authorities of Tejupilco to protect the family of the murdered journalist and requested that the “possible relationship of the crime with their journalistic activity” be looked into and fully investigated. 

There has been an outpouring of reactions to the senseless murder on social media from fellow journalists who are hoping to see an end of this trend. 

Credit: @notociasmundo2020 / Twitter

There has been an outpouring on anger and sadness since the news of Condes’s murder broke last week. Many journalists in Mexico and around the world have chimed in on the tragedy calling for immediate action. 

“All our solidarity with the family and colleagues of the Mexican journalist #NevithCondesJaramillo murdered. Without secure journalism and decent and long-lasting jobs, democracy corrodes in its foundations. Populism began destroying serious journalism,” Fernando Vidal, a fellow Mexican journalist tweeted. 

The latest journalist murder underscores the growing dangers for media members in the country who are being attacked in record numbers. 

Credit: @univ_english / Twitter

Advocacy group, Reporters Without Borders, which releases annual rankings of the world’s most dangerous countries for news media, placed Mexico alongside war-torn Syria and Afghanistan. The country has been plagued with ongoing drug and gang violence since 2006. Murders in the country have spiked in the first half of this year and at this current pace, it will most likely be the highest on record, according to official data.

Just last month there were similar murders in Mexico that left three journalists killed within a week. Committee to Protect Journalists (CPJ), an independent non-profit organization, condemned the killings and called on Mexico to take action on the growing problem. 

“These two brutal killings within days of each other are the tragic consequence of Mexico’s failure to seriously address impunity in attacks on the press,” the group said in a statement. 

The spiraling violence underscores the challenges President Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador has faced since taking office in December with promises and initiatives to reduce violence in the country ravaged by notorious drug traffickers. The violence that has been linked to drug trafficking and political corruption is growing rampant in Mexico with many murders going unpunished.

“Collusion between officials and organized crime poses a grave threat to journalists’ safety and cripples the judicial system at all levels,” the RSF said in a statement. “As a result, Mexico is sinking ever deeper into a spiral of violence and impunity and continues to be Latin America’s most dangerous country for reporters.”

READ: First It Was Soap And Toothbrushes, Now CBP Won’t Provide Flu Vaccines To Migrants In Detention Centers

Photographer Diego Huerta Took An Update Photo Of The Most Beautiful Girl In Mexico

Culture

Photographer Diego Huerta Took An Update Photo Of The Most Beautiful Girl In Mexico

diegohuertaphoto / Instagram

Diego Huerta is a photographer who has used his talents and time to document indigenous communities to preserve the culture and history. One of Huerta’s most famous photos was one of a young girl that he called the most beautiful girl in Mexico. He recently shared a new photo of the girl as a woman.

Diego Huerta shared an updated photo of the most beautiful girl woman in Mexico.

Huerta first met the girl when he was traveling through Mexico years ago. The first photo, posted in 2016 but taken in 2011, highlighted the young woman that he dubbed the most beautiful girl in Mexico. The latest photo shows the girl grown up and still living in her same pueblo in 2017. She is still a stunning reminder of the beauty that exists in southern Mexico.

The woman lives in Chiapas, the last Mexican state before entering Central America by way of Guatemala. There are multiple indigenous communities in Chiapas. While Huerta does not mention the indigenous community the woman belongs to, the clothing appears to represent the Zoque people.

The woman is still creating wander and interest among Huerta’s fans.

Credit: diegohuertaphoto / Instagram

Her quiet and still composure makes her seem like a Mexican Mona Lisa, tbh. Her stoic face in the photographs has captivated Huerta fans for years. The first photo of the young woman was seen around the world and her beauty was celebrated by everyone who saw the photo.

The young girl’s eyes are what drew in the love and praise from people around the world.

Huerta made it a point to call out the young girl’s eyes in the photo. It isn’t because of the color of her eyes. He was intrigued by her eyes because she is deaf and her eyes are one of the ways she is able to communicate with the world around her.

“In my journey through South Mexico, in a town located in the middle of the Chiapas’ mountains I found the most brilliant eyes that I have ever seen,” Huerta wrote in the original post. “The beauty of this girl was similar to the panoramic views I was able to appreciate every time I turned around. She´s deaf, the way to communicate with her was by signs. It is no mystery that the beauty of the true Mexican woman is way above all beauty contests.”

People are obsessing over her beauty that seems to improve with age.

Credit: diegohuertaphoto / Instagram

Nine years makes a big difference in a young person’s development. It can be the difference between 11 and 20, which is a huge difference. Her silent beauty is proof that indigenous communities hold some of the most beautiful people in the world. There is no reason to praise and adhere to Euro-centric beauty standards.

The Instagram posted is filled with messages of appreciation celebrating the photo and the young woman we saw grow up.

Credit: diegohuertaphoto / Instagram

Huerta currently has a documentary about the Tehuana people in Oaxaca. His photographs and film collection highlighting and exalting the indigenous community of Mexico is beautiful and necessary. He is collecting an important and vibrant part of human history by giving the first people to inhabit the land a chance to shine and show who Mexico truly is.

READ: Photographer Diego Huerta Is Giving Everyone A Look Into The Tehuana Culture In Oaxaca, Mexico

Amid Rising Domestic Violence, Mexico’s AMLO Says That 90% Of Women’s Calls For Help Are Fake

Things That Matter

Amid Rising Domestic Violence, Mexico’s AMLO Says That 90% Of Women’s Calls For Help Are Fake

Hector Vivas / Getty

Mexico’s President Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador, AMLO, has faced serious criticism from around the world for his handling of the Coronavirus pandemic. His government has been accused of fumbling its response and not having a real, concrete plan to help the country of nearly 130 million people weather the storm.

However, before the pandemic arrived, AMLO was also in hot water for his handling of increased gender-based violence across the country – with femicides reaching record levels. So far, his response has been to brush the issue away as ‘fake news concocted by his opposition.

Now the two issues of femicide and the pandemic have collided as there’s also been an increase in domestic violence, as victims are forced to stay at home. But yet again, AMLO is denying these reports as fake news.

The Mexican President said that Coronavirus lockdowns won’t contribute to violence as much as in other countries because ‘Mexicans are different.’

At one of his daily press conferences meant to address the Coronavirus and a variety of other issues affecting the country, President AMLO made sure to preface his statement with a fairly long disclaimer of sorts. He urged the media not to misquote him or misreport what he said – but it was quite clear:

“I’m going to give you a piece of information that doesn’t mean that violence against women doesn’t exist,” AMLO said. “I don’t want you to misinterpret me because a lot of what I say is taken out of context: 90% of those calls … are false, it’s proven.”

Instead, the president maintained a more romantic view of life under quarantine in Mexico, where he said “there has always been harmonious cohabitation.”

“The Mexican family is different from families in Europe and the United States; Mexicans are used to living together, being together. … In the homes of Mexicans, the children are there, the daughters-in-law, the grandchildren, and there has always been harmonious cohabitation. In other places, where this tradition, this culture, doesn’t exist it might be that isolation causes aggravation, confrontation and violence,” he said.

President AMLO is literally denying several reports that contradict his hopeful narrative.

Credit: Hector Vivas / Getty

According to the Spotlight Initiative, a partnership between the United Nations and the European Union that is aiming to eliminate all forms of violence against women and girls by 2030, Mexican women made more than 115,000 calls to the 911 emergency number in March to report violence, a 22% increase compared to February. The figure equates to an average of 155 calls per hour during the month.

But according to the president, 90% of these are fake.

After his own Interior Secretary estimated that violence against women had increased 60% during the coronavirus isolation period, the president said it wasn’t necessarily true.

Such violence “cannot be measured using the same parameters as the rest of the world. In Mexico we have a culture of solidarity within the family. The family in Mexico is exceptional, it’s the most fraternal human nucleus…”

For his part, AMLO did say that the Interior Ministry and the National Women’s Institute are taking action against the problem but sought to downplay its severity.

Denying violence against women has been a cornerstone of AMLO’s presidency.

Almost 1,000 women have been murdered in Mexico in the first three months of the year, in comparison to 890 murders last year. Nearly 250 of these murders are attributed to femicide, or the act of killing a woman because of her gender. Across the region, domestic abuse rates have drastically increased since countries began nationwide lockdowns. Nearly 20 million women and girls experience sexual and physical abuse each year in Latin America.

Endless stories on horrific murders – and daily indignities such as harassment, catcalls and being groped on public transit – have prompted a burgeoning women’s movement, whose members have protested online and in the streets and organized a national women’s strike on March 9th.

However, the president has cast himself as the victim of feminist activists and an opposition that is creating the issue solely to undermine his presidency.

Feminists continue denouncing femicides committed during the pandemic and demanding justice. Despite campus closures, students maintained a five-month-long occupation of the School of Philosophy and Letters at Mexico’s top public university, UNAM, and its affiliate high schools over authorities’ inaction in the face of widespread sexual harassment, assault, and even the deaths and disappearances of students.

Despite the López Obrador’s remarks, his supporters are still hopeful that his government can implement a feminist agenda.