Things That Matter

Latinos Are Sharing Their Family’s Immigration Stories On Twitter Because The US Was Created For Immigrants

Immigration has become one of the most contentious topics in U.S. politics since President Trump jumped into the Republican primaries in 2015. He launched his campaign calling Mexican immigrants criminals and rapists and he has continued in his attack of the immigrant community after winning the election. One point of immigration that has especially angered Trump is “chain migration,” which allows family members of U.S. citizens can become U.S. citizens through sponsorship. While Trump is against such migration, First Lady Melania Trump’s parents just used that same system to become U.S. citizens.

First Lady Melania Trump’s parents, who are natives of Slovenia, recently became U.S. citizens under her sponsorship through “chain migration.”

In response, Politico published a story by Senior Advisor Stephen Miller’s uncle, Dr. David Glosser in which he writes that if Miller’s anti-immigration agenda had been in place a century ago, his Jewish family “would have been wiped out.”

Attorney Asha Rangappa, a former FBI Special Agent, took to Twitter after the news and asked people to share their #ImmigrantStories.

“Hearing his accent, and seeing that he was an older gentleman, I asked where he was from and when he came here,” Rangappa tweeted. “He told me that his family immigrated here from Ireland in 1982. He then asked, ‘What are we going to do? Is anything going to happen to him?’ I told him that I didn’t know what was going to happen, but that the most important thing that anyone could do is vote. He told me that his father died in 1973 at the age of 48, having never voted. He said it was because he wasn’t a ‘householder’ (? not sure what he meant). And he said, ‘So I promise you that I vote whenever I get a chance.’ I so loved this conversation (which was slightly longer than described), and it occurred to me: I, for one, would love to hear people’s #ImmigrantStories.”

The response was overwhelming. Here’s some of our favorite Latino immigration stories.

This country was created for the purpose of people from around the world to find refuge. It is a place where race and class should not determine your place in society or future.

From refugees of theSalvadoran  Civil War to professionals.

This story by Ana Fuentes is a true reflection of how immigrants improve their lives and succeed no matter what obstacles are in front of them.

Immigrants so love thier adopted him that they fight to defend it.

Unlike the rhetoric coming from the White House, immigrants contribute to the success of this country.

We know what it means to work hard.

Retirement isn’t something our parents and grandparents thought about. Many of our elders find the work they want to do and they stick with it until they physically cannot work anymore.

This family came to the U.S. right before the Great Depression.

And despite the economic disaster, the family stuck it out and made things work.

And, no matter what, we will work for whatever we want and need to further our families.


READ: This Military Veteran Served Two Tours In Afghanistan And Was Deported In The Middle Of The Night

Do you have an #ImmigrantStory you’d like us to know about? Let us know by sharing this story and commenting below!

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This Migrant Mother Spent Three Years In Church Sanctuary But Now She’s Free

Things That Matter

This Migrant Mother Spent Three Years In Church Sanctuary But Now She’s Free

Lawyers are working hard to get a deportation order removed against a woman who just left a church sanctuary after three years in the refuge. Although she was previously denied asylum in the U.S., advocates are hoping that under new direction from the Biden administration, her case will be reviewed and she’ll be able to stay with her family in Ohio – where she’s lived for more than twenty years.

A mother of three is back with her family after living three years inside a church.

A mother of three who sought refugee inside an Ohio church from immigration authorities has finally been able to leave three years later. Edith Espinal, who herself is an immigrant rights advocate, had been living at the Columbus Mennonite Church since October 2017 to avoid being deported to Mexico. She’s now out of the church and back with her family following a meeting with Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) officials, who have agreed that she’s not an immediate priority for deportation.

“Finally, I can go home,” Espinal told reporters after meeting with the officials. With tears of relief, she celebrated the small victory in the presence of dozens of supporters who accompanied her to the ICE building.

“But it is not the end of her case. We’re still going to have to fight,” her attorney Lizbeth Mateo said.

ICE has agreed to hold off on her deportation proceedings pending her asylum request.

Espinal was released under an order of supervision, meaning that while she’s not considered an immediate priority for deportation, she must periodically check in with ICE officials to inform them about her whereabouts.

She has lived in Columbus for more than two decades and had previously applied for asylum, citing rising violence in her home state of Michoacán. But she eventually was ordered to leave the country, which is when she sought refuge inside the Columbus, Ohio church.

“We’re going to continue pressing the Biden administration to do the right thing, and try to get rid of that order of deportation against Edith, so she can walk freely like everyone else does without fear,” Mateo said during the press conference.

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The Rio Grande Claims Life Of An 8-Year-Old Boy As Migrants Risk Arctic Conditions To Cross Into U.S.

Things That Matter

The Rio Grande Claims Life Of An 8-Year-Old Boy As Migrants Risk Arctic Conditions To Cross Into U.S.

Texas is seeing an unprecedented weather crisis as much of the state is plunged into bitterly cold conditions. But that hasn’t stopped many migrants and refugees from attempting to cross into the U.S. for protection.

Many migrants cross the Rio Grande (or Río Bravo en Mexico) between Texas and the Mexican state of Tamaulipas. Crossing the Rio Grande is always a dangerous undertaking but now, thanks to the freezing weather, it’s an especially perilous journey and it’s claimed the life of another child.

An 8-year-old boy has drowned while crossing the river with his family.

Authorities have reported that an 8-year-old Honduran boy has become the latest victim in a string of drownings at the Rio Grande, between the the U.S. and Mexico. Despite the unprecedented weather, migrants continue to attempt to cross the dangerous river to reach the U.S.

The child was with his family attempting to cross the river when he drowned on Wednesday, just as Texas was gripped by Arctic conditions which have killed more than 30 people and left millions in Mexico and Texas without power, water and food. The boy’s parents and sister apparently made it to the U.S., but were returned to Mexico by U.S. Border Patrol.

According to Mexican immigration officials, the boy “couldn’t withstand the pounding water, which covered him and kept him submerged for several meters”. His body was recovered but attempts to revive him were unsuccessful.

The Rio Grande is notoriously dangerous for people attempting to cross the border.

The journey across the Rio Grande has always been a perilous one, with hundreds of people, many of whom could not swim, having drowned over the years after being caught by the deceptively deep waters and strong current.

Add in the current winter storm currently blanketing the entire state of Texas, has produced significant snow and prolonged freezing temperatures, has made the crossing even more dangerous.

In fact, earlier in the week, the river had claimed another victim. A woman from Venezuela died trying to cross the river in the same area after getting trapped in below-freezing currents. Three others suffered hypothermia: one was treated by the Red Cross in Mexico, while the other two made it the US border.

Drownings are just one of the dangers migrants face.

Apart from the potential for drownings, migrants face a wide range of dangerous while attempting to cross from Mexico into the U.S. In late January, 19 bodies were found shot and burned in a vehicle near the town of Camargo, also across the border from Texas.

There’s also the threat of violence from drug cartels and smugglers, corrupt officials, and other extreme elements, such as heat during the summer.

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