Things That Matter

Immigration Officials Deported Undocumented Father Of Three Because Of His HIV Status

Last summer, U.S. District Attorney Judge Dana Sabraw ordered the Trump administration to stop separating children from their parents under their “zero-tolerance” policy that had begun a few months prior. However, that order did not prevent immigration officials from separating children from their parents for myriad reasons. The reasoning for continuing to separate kids from their parents (or excuse is more like it) is because officials claimed the parent was unfit to parent, they were denied asylum, or they had prior charges in their native country. Since then, more than 900 families have been affected by Trump’s anti-immigration policy, which has caused more separations between child and parent. One such case is heartbreakingly tragic because it’s a violation on multiple levels. 

Three young girls were separated from their father without an explanation. However, their dad said it’s because immigration officials found out that he is HIV-positive.

Credit: @pritheworld / Twitter

In November 2018,  Andrea, 14, Leiliana, 13, and Sofia, 11, and their dad crossed the U.S. border in El Paso, Texas from Honduras. They, like many undocumented immigrants, were held in cold detention centers that many refer to as iceboxes. In an interview with Public Radio International, the family said that they were held in the icebox for three days, all of them together until their dad was abruptly taken away without an explanation. The dad, Jose, said he is sure that he was separated from his daughters because of his HIV-positive status. 

The father said that he brought with him two bottles of his HIV medication. When officials asked him what it was, he initially lied because “the less people know, the better.”

Credit: @WNYC / Twitter

Immigration officials tested the medicine and found out it was to treat people with HIV. That gave Jose the inclination to believe they deported him because of that. “It has to be that because there’s no other reason,” he told PRI. His assumption was correct. The American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) found out the reason why Jose was taken away from his daughters, and it did have to do with his HIV status. 

Immigration officials told the ACLU that Jose’s HIV is a communicable disease and cannot be allowed in the country.

Credit: @danarubenstein / Twitter

By definition communicable disease is an” illnesses caused by viruses or bacteria that people spread to one another through contact with contaminated surfaces, bodily fluids, blood products, insect bites, or through the air.” 

Before 2010, undocumented people with HIV could not enter the U.S. but because HIV is now treatable with medication the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has removed the HIV infection from the definition of communicable disease of public health significance. Therefore immigration officials cannot use the excuse that undocumented people with HIV cannot be allowed in the U.S

The daughters said that their father is fine because he takes his medication, so why would his HIV status prevent him from entering the country? Jose also happened to fail his credible fear interview.

Credit: @jensalan / Twitter

Each undocumented person that enters the country and is seeking asylum status has to undergo a credible fear interview to discuss why they’re afraid to return to their country. Many undocumented people who flee Central America report they fear for their lives due to violence and persecution. Jose said police in his homeland of Honduras threatened to kill his family, but immigration officials didn’t believe him, so he was denied and deported. 

Even though Jose is back in Honduras, he could still possibly be allowed to re-enter the U.S. and see his family.

Credit: @NYCLU / Twitter

Jose’s kids are part of a class-action lawsuit by the ACLU that includes more than 900 other families that have been deported after a judge had already prohibited the separation of families. 

“It is shocking that the Trump administration continues to take babies from their parents,” Lee Gelernt, deputy director of the ACLU’s Immigrants’ Rights Project said according to NPR. “The administration must not be allowed to circumvent the court order over infractions like minor traffic violations.”

Just today, the same judge that forced the Trump Administration to end family separation last year ruled that 11 parents who were deported without their children can come back into the U.S. Judge Dana Sabraw said those parents were wrongfully denied asylum. According to CBS News, “The judge found that some of the migrants were probably coerced into authorizing their deportation and were given inaccurate or misleading information by immigration authorities.”

It is unclear if Jose is one of the eleven parents told they could come back and reunite with his three daughters, but we’re hoping he is. 

READ: Customs And Border Protections Chief Mark Morgan Defended The Mississippi Raids Despite Children Left Without Parents

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Honduran Woman Gave Birth On Bridge Between U.S. And Mexico Border But What Will Happen To Them Next?

Things That Matter

Honduran Woman Gave Birth On Bridge Between U.S. And Mexico Border But What Will Happen To Them Next?

Julio César Aguilar / Getty Images

As the number of parents and children crossing the border continues to increase, driven by violence and poverty in Central America, many are growing desperate while being forced to wait in migrant camps in Mexico. While crossings have not reached the levels seen in previous years, facilities that hold migrants are approaching capacity, which has been reduced because of the coronavirus pandemic.

This is forcing many to check the status of their claims by crossing into the U.S. to speak to border agents. So it shouldn’t come as a surprise that more and more women are being forced to give birth in less than ideal situations – putting at risk both the lives of the mother and child.

A migrant woman gave birth on a bridge between U.S.-Mexico border.

According to Mexican border authorities, a Honduran woman gave birth on the Mexican side of the border bridge between Matamoros, Mexico and Brownsville, Texas. The woman was apparently trying to reach the U.S. side, but felt unsteady when she got there and was helped by pedestrians on the Mexican side waiting to cross.

Mexico’s National Immigration Institute said the birth occurred Saturday afternoon on the Ignacio Zaragoza border bridge, also known as “Los Tomates.” It said authorities received an alert from U.S. Customs and Border Protection officials regarding “a woman trying to enter the country improperly.”

It said the woman was taken to a hospital in Matamoros, where she was given free care. Her child will have the right to Mexican citizenship.

Hernández is hardly the first woman to give birth while hoping to cross into the U.S.

Just last month, a woman gave birth along the U.S. side of the Rio Grande. She had just crossed the river and her smugglers were yelling at her to keep moving as U.S. Border Patrol agents arrived. But she couldn’t continue, fell to the ground, and began to give birth.

The mother and her her daughter are safe and in good health. “They treated me well, thank God,” said the woman, who didn’t want her name used because she fears retribution if she’s forced to leave the country, in an interview with ABC News.

“There’s so many women in great danger,” Sister Norma Pimentel, executive director of Catholic Charities of the Rio Grande Valley, told ABC News. “They must really think before they do what they do and risk the life of their unborn child.”

Like so many other women, Hernández was waiting in Mexico under Trump’s cruel immigration policies.

Hernández was reportedly among about 800 migrants sheltering in an improvised riverside camp while awaiting U.S. hearings on their claims for asylum or visas. Other migrants are waiting in Matamoros, but have rented rooms.

Thousands of other migrants are waiting in other Mexican border cities for a chance to enter the U.S. — some for years. The Trump administration has turned away tens of thousands at legal border crossings, first citing a shortage of space and then telling people to wait for court dates under its “Remain in Mexico” policy.

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Black, Latino, And Native American Communities Being Hospitalized At Higher Rates For Covid

Things That Matter

Black, Latino, And Native American Communities Being Hospitalized At Higher Rates For Covid

Mario Tama / Getty Images

Covid-19 cases are surging throughout the U.S. More than 100,000 people a day are testing positive for the virus. A recent study shows that Black, Latino, and Native American people are four times more likely to be hospitalized for Covid-19.

There is more evidence that communities of color are facing disproportionate levels of Covid hospitalizations.

A new report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is highlighting news we have been hearing throughout the pandemic. Communities of color are under attack by Covid at disproportionate hospitalization levels when compared to their white counterparts.

The CDC report shows that Latinos are 4.2 times more likely to be hospitalized when compared to non-Latino white people. Native Americans and Black people are 4.1 to 3.9 times as likely to be hospitalized from Covid than their white counterparts.

The staggering statistic is part of a trend of communities of color suffering disproportionately from Covid.

An earlier study by the CDC found that Black and Latino people were more likely to suffer from workplace outbreaks. Many Latinos fill roles in frontline jobs and the industries hit hard by workplace outbreaks have Latino overrepresented. According to the study, workplace outbreaks in Utah were heaviest in three industries: manufacturing, wholesale retail, and construction. While Latinos made up one quarter of the workforce, they represented one-third of Covid infections.

Latinos have been facing some of the wort impacts from the virus from health to finances.

The Latino community has faced a devastated financial burden from Covid-19. In Los Angeles, Latinos have lost more financially than other communities because of Covid. According to a study by the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, 71 percent of Latino households in Los Angeles were facing serious financial hardships. This is compared to 52 percent of Black households and 31 percent of whites.

The incoming Biden/Harris administration is ready to tackle the disproportionate impact on communities of color.

Covid-19 is exposing the several inequities that exist in our society. The disproportionate death, infection, and hospitalization rates of Covid in communities of color needs to be addressed. People are calling on the federal government to step up and help their suffering citizens.

READ: Both Parents Of 4-Year-Old Texas Boy Die Within Months Of Each Other From Covid

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