Things That Matter

Pro-Immigrant Activists Interrupted Trump At His Cincinnati Rally And His Response Was Priceless

Trump’s re-election campaign and his giant rallies a cross the country have basically become synonymous with rowdy crowds and often times racist rhetoric.

His rally last night in Cincinnati wasn’t any different, except this time the event was interrupted by pro-immigrant activists who wanted to make sure their voices – and the voices of immigrants across this country – were heard.

A group of pro-immigrant activists interrupted Trump’s rambling speech with chants of “Chinga La Migra” and “Immigrants built America.”

Trump paused his rally for nearly three minutes after protesters interrupted his remarks Wednesday evening in Cincinnati.

The protesters held signs that said “Immigrants Built America” and “Chinga La Migra” — Spanish for “f*** border patrol.” The protest broke out when Trump began talking about immigration and building a wall along the U.S.-Mexico border.

One of the president’s supporters took the “Immigrants Built America” banner out of the protester’s hand and threw it in the crowd.

The protester then held up the second sign, which the same supporter tried to rip from the protester’s hand. The action resulted in a small scuffle before the protesters were escorted out.

These are the roughly four minutes when pro-immigrant activists made sure their voices were heard at last night’s rally.

The protests interrupted Trump when he began talking about “illegal aliens” and how Democrats want to welcome them with open boarders.

“Democrat lawmakers care more about illegal aliens than they care about their own constituents,” Trump told the audience, prompting applause. “They put foreign citizens before American citizens. We’re not going to do that.”

And this was Trump’s less than thought out response to a situation that obviously made him uncomfortable.

“Cincinnati, do you have a Democrat mayor?” Trump asked sarcastically during the long pause in his stump speech. Many across social media pointed out the President’s incorrect grammar – it’s not “Democrat Mayor” it’s “Democratic Mayor, Mr. President.

Trump has also gone viral on Twitter for his reaction as one of the protesters was being removed from the rally.

https://twitter.com/ssuttonslc/status/1157093836746678272?s=21

As one protester was getting kicked out of the event, Mr Trump appeared to make the “You’re fired” finger point he made famous on The Apprentice, before making a strange motion just below his waist.

Some viewers discussing it on social media interpreted the gesture as “rude” and “unprofessional”, while others argued Mr Trump was only motioning for the protesters to “get out” with his thumb.

Many on Twitter were putting their hands together fo these obviously brave protesters.

With the violence that often breaks out at Trump’s rallies and the overall animosity that his supporters have for anyone who expreses views against theirs and their President, it’s very dangerous what these activists did.

Even though many pointed out just how dangerous it can be, many on Twitter wanted to see more protests like this one.

But some on Twitter thought that the more Trump’s supporters see that not everyone is actually happy in Trump’s America, that there are opinions outside of theirs and Fox News, maybe , just maybe, they might start listening.

A few hours before his rally, Trump said it was nearly impossible to stop his supporters from chanting racist and offensive remarks.

But when it came to the immigrant activists, Trump and his supporters were quick to silence them.

Protesters weren’t the only source of the crowd’s animosity Thursday night.

According to a pretty terrifying report from HuFfPost, before Trump took the stage, a large, white man lingered by the designated press area, leaning over the gate and looking menacingly at reporters. He then pointed at certain reporters and made a slicing motion across his neck. The man also made the shape of his gun with his thumb and two fingers, pretending to take a weapon out of his pocket.

Confronted by a HuffPost reporter about the threats, the man wouldn’t identify himself.

“If I were president, they’d all be in jail for treason, for fake news,” he said, pointing to all the reporters. “Every channel but Fox.”

Rihanna Revealed A Childhood Experience That She Says Connects Her To Mexican Migrants In The U.S.

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Rihanna Revealed A Childhood Experience That She Says Connects Her To Mexican Migrants In The U.S.

Badgirlriri / Instagram

Rihanna has never been afraid to speak her mind. She’s a woman who speaks up for issues she cares about and people listen to her. That’s why so many love her – present company included.

The ‘Umbrella’ singer, how has been kind of off the musical radar as of late, spoke out in a new interview with British Vogue and she had a few things to say about her upcoming music, where she’s been living, and her relationship with migrant communities.

Rihanna continues to use her platform and reach of over 200 million followers across social media to bring awareness to social issues that are important to her.

Credit: Chesnot / WireImage

In an interview with Vogue, the creator of “Fenty Beauty” explained feeling empathy with Mexicans and Latinos who are discriminated against in the United States, since she says that she knows how it feels to be on the end of discriminatory policies.

“The Guyanese are like the Mexicans of Barbados,” she said. “So I identify—and that’s why I really relate and empathize with Mexican people or Latino people, who are discriminated against in America. I know what it feels like to have the immigration come into your home in the middle of the night and drag people out.”

Similarly, she recalled the times in which she suffered and the difficulties her and mother experienced when they emigrated from Barbados.

Credit: badgirlriri / Instagram

Rihanna was born Robyn Rihanna Fenty in St. Michael, Barbados to a Guyanese mother and Barbadian father.

In the Vogue interview, she added: “Let’s say I know what that fight is like. I have witnessed it, I have been there. I think I was eight years old when I had to live that in the middle of the night. So I know how daunting it is for a child, and if my father had been dragged out of my house, I can guarantee you that my life would have been a disaster.”

In that same Vogue interview, Rihanna confessed to something that few people outsider her inner circle even knew.

Credit: badgirlriri / Instagram

She explained that in recent years she has become a bit of a nomad, having a house in London, Paris, Barbados and Mexico, where she feels more relaxed.

“I just love Mexico. I really need to do my DNA test,” she jokingly told Afua Hirsch of Vogue. Perhaps she was an agave plant, in a past life, she pondered.

Rihanna has been vocal about immigrant rights in the past and takes great pride in her origins.

Credit: badgirlriri / Instagram

The Grammy Award winning singer and entrepreneur has very publicly thrown shade at President Trump over his cruel immigration policies.

Rihanna, who’s been appointed as the ambassador of her native country Barbados, is no stranger to political matters. She sent a cease-and-desist letter to President Donald Trump in early November after he played her music at one of his rallies. She also rejected the opportunity to perform during the Super Bowl LIII in February 2019 out of protest for Colin Kaepernick.

Plus, in an interview with The Cut last year about the word ‘immigrant’, she said: “For me, it’s a prideful word. To know that you can come from humble beginnings and just take over whatever you want to, dominate at whatever you put your mind to. The world becomes your oyster, and there’s no limit. Wherever I go, except for Barbados, I’m an immigrant. I think people forget that a lot of times.”

The National Popular Vote May Be The Fastest Way To Get Rid Of The Electoral College

Things That Matter

The National Popular Vote May Be The Fastest Way To Get Rid Of The Electoral College

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We may not be able to get rid of the electoral college without a constitutional amendment but a new proposal known as the National Popular Vote (NPV) is picking up a lot of steam. 

The United States is supposed to be a democracy where voters choose their leaders. In the past two decades, the will of the people has been subverted by the will of the electoral college. Imagine how the country might be different had Al Gore, an environmentalist, who won the popular vote against George W. Bush, who started the disastrous Iraq war, was elected instead? Imagine if Hillary Clinton, who hasn’t been accused of sexual assault two dozen times, and beat Donald Trump by 3 million votes had secured her seat in the oval? 

15 states and the District of Columbia have already adopted NPV.

“As signatories, each jurisdiction pledges to select Electoral College members who support the presidential candidate who won the most votes nationally, regardless of which candidate won the most votes in that particular jurisdiction,” according to the Atlantic

NPV is an interstate compact that requires a certain level of commitment from neighboring states. The pact will go into effect when participating states total 270 electoral college votes (the required number for the president-elect). The 16 regions that have made the commitment are already at 196 electoral college votes. 

NPV is also making waves in state politics on a lower level. It appear state officials are paving a way to pass the pact.

“The National Popular Vote bill has now passed a total of 40 state legislative chambers in 24 states. It has also passed at least one legislative chamber in 8 states possessing 75 electoral votes (AR, AZ, ME, MI, MN, NC, NV, OK).  It has been unanimously approved at the committee level in 2 states possessing 27 more electoral votes (GA, MO),” according to NationalPopularVote.com.

The plan would not totally eradicate the electoral college but it would mean that state leaders have made a commitment to effectively ignore it. Voters often express conflicting attitudes about candidates: they really love one candidate, but question if they can win the electoral college. Proponents of NPV would argue such compromises have no place in a democracy and NPV can help eliminate the conflict altogether. 

NPV could solve two major issues with the electoral college.

There are two major longstanding issues with the electoral college. The first is that our system is based on the premise of “one voter, one vote.” However, the system is skewed in favor of voters in a few small states. Electoral votes are determined by the number of representatives in Congress which is determined by the state population. 

The Washington Post notes that while small states receive a minimum of three electoral votes, larger states have limits on how many electoral votes they can receive. 

” Wyoming, with 586,107 residents — gets three electoral college votes… Consider that California, the most populous state, has 39,144,818 residents and 55 electoral college votes,” according to the paper. “That means that in the electoral college, each individual Wyoming vote weighs 3.6 times more than an individual Californian’s vote.” 

The second issue is the “winner take all” effect, where no matter how small a margin of victory a candidate has, they take all the electoral votes. This means our election outcomes are determined by a few swing states. While some argue that a popular vote will hurt the Republican party, such detractors might ask why Republicans are unable to curry enough favor to win over most American voters. 

The electoral college also disenfranchises about 4 million voters who live on territories.

“Roughly 4 million Americans live in the United States’ five permanently populated overseas territories — and they have no voice in selecting a president. That includes Puerto Rico, the United States’ most populous overseas territory, whose population is larger than that of 21 states and the District of Columbia,” according to the Washington Post. 

While residents of the territories can participate in primaries (Marco Rubio won the Puerto Rican GOP primary by a landslide in 2016, for example), they have no electoral votes with the exception of Washington, D.C. 

“More and more, the United States is likely to elect presidents who haven’t won the popular vote — awarding the presidency to a party that has no popular mandate. The compromises behind the U.S. election system are failing at their goals,” Katy Collin wrote for the Washington Post

One of the original intentions of the electoral college may have been to give smaller states a voice, but it has essentially assured that smaller states are the only voices that matter when it comes to picking our most important leader.