Things That Matter

Family Demands To See A Warrant, But ICE Says “You’ve Seen Too Many Movies” And Burst In Anyway

On May 2, a video given to Telemundo shows U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) officers attempting to enter a residence in National City, California. The front door of the home is secured with a gate. The ICE agents trying to get inside the home are heard asking the residents to open the door.

The video captures residents inside the home demanding that ICE shows them a warrant.

The agents insist that they open the door, but the mother and 11-year-old daughter Jocelyn (who was the one recording the video) demand to be shown a warrant. They tell them “you cannot come in without a warrant.”

One of the agents responds by saying “Ma’am, you’re watching too much movies,” and then says: “We’ll show you the warrant when we’re done.” But the mother requests that they slip the warrant under the door. From the time the video began until the end of the recording, they are never shown a warrant.

ICE entered the home without showing them a warrant and arrested 31-year-old Alberto Alonso Hernández.

According to the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU), they state on their website that legally ICE agents cannot enter a home without a warrant. “If officers are at your door, keep the door closed and ask if they are Immigration agents, or from ICE. Ask the agents what they are there for.”

“Opening the door does not give the agents permission to come inside, but it is safer to speak to ICE through the door.”

Further more, according to ACLU: “If the agents want to enter, ask them if they have a warrant signed by a judge. If ICE agents do not have a warrant signed by a judge, you may refuse to open the door or let them in. An administrative warrant of removal from immigration authorities is not enough. If they say they have a warrant, ask them to slip the warrant under the door.”

The family in the video did exactly what they were supposed to do. They asked to see the warrant, and even asked them to slip it under the door. ICE agents did not. They said: “we will show you once this is done.”

ACLU also informs, what to do if they enter anyway:

“If agents force their way in anyway, do not attempt to resist. If you wish to exercise your rights, state: ‘I do not consent to your entry or to your search of these premises. I am exercising my right to remain silent. I wish to speak with a lawyer as soon as possible.'”

It’s unclear what happened after ICE entered the home because the recording ended.

In an emailed statement to mitú, ICE said that Alonso-Hernandez is a Mexican national and was taken into ICE custody by officers with the San Diego Enforcement and Removal Operations (ERO) office.

“ERO officers attempted to arrest Mr. Alonso-Hernandez during a vehicle stop near his residence. The suspect fled from the scene and hid inside his house, forcing the officers to obtain a criminal arrest warrant for illegal re-entering the United States. The warrant was issued by a federal judge and Mr. Alonso-Hernandez was taken into custody at his residence several hours later.”

They added that ICE legally obtained and properly executed a federal criminal arrest warrant issued by the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of California. But they didn’t state when the agents actually showed the warrant to the family.

ICE goes on to say that Alonso-Hernandez was targeted for arrest based on his prior criminal and immigration history. ICE records reveal he was convicted for battery of a spouse in 2007,  and has illegally re-entered the United States 16 times since 2003.


READ: Six Children Have Been Orphaned After A Couple Died In A Car Accident While Trying To Flee ICE Officers

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This Migrant Mother Spent Three Years In Church Sanctuary But Now She’s Free

Things That Matter

This Migrant Mother Spent Three Years In Church Sanctuary But Now She’s Free

Lawyers are working hard to get a deportation order removed against a woman who just left a church sanctuary after three years in the refuge. Although she was previously denied asylum in the U.S., advocates are hoping that under new direction from the Biden administration, her case will be reviewed and she’ll be able to stay with her family in Ohio – where she’s lived for more than twenty years.

A mother of three is back with her family after living three years inside a church.

A mother of three who sought refugee inside an Ohio church from immigration authorities has finally been able to leave three years later. Edith Espinal, who herself is an immigrant rights advocate, had been living at the Columbus Mennonite Church since October 2017 to avoid being deported to Mexico. She’s now out of the church and back with her family following a meeting with Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) officials, who have agreed that she’s not an immediate priority for deportation.

“Finally, I can go home,” Espinal told reporters after meeting with the officials. With tears of relief, she celebrated the small victory in the presence of dozens of supporters who accompanied her to the ICE building.

“But it is not the end of her case. We’re still going to have to fight,” her attorney Lizbeth Mateo said.

ICE has agreed to hold off on her deportation proceedings pending her asylum request.

Espinal was released under an order of supervision, meaning that while she’s not considered an immediate priority for deportation, she must periodically check in with ICE officials to inform them about her whereabouts.

She has lived in Columbus for more than two decades and had previously applied for asylum, citing rising violence in her home state of Michoacán. But she eventually was ordered to leave the country, which is when she sought refuge inside the Columbus, Ohio church.

“We’re going to continue pressing the Biden administration to do the right thing, and try to get rid of that order of deportation against Edith, so she can walk freely like everyone else does without fear,” Mateo said during the press conference.

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The Rio Grande Claims Life Of An 8-Year-Old Boy As Migrants Risk Arctic Conditions To Cross Into U.S.

Things That Matter

The Rio Grande Claims Life Of An 8-Year-Old Boy As Migrants Risk Arctic Conditions To Cross Into U.S.

Texas is seeing an unprecedented weather crisis as much of the state is plunged into bitterly cold conditions. But that hasn’t stopped many migrants and refugees from attempting to cross into the U.S. for protection.

Many migrants cross the Rio Grande (or Río Bravo en Mexico) between Texas and the Mexican state of Tamaulipas. Crossing the Rio Grande is always a dangerous undertaking but now, thanks to the freezing weather, it’s an especially perilous journey and it’s claimed the life of another child.

An 8-year-old boy has drowned while crossing the river with his family.

Authorities have reported that an 8-year-old Honduran boy has become the latest victim in a string of drownings at the Rio Grande, between the the U.S. and Mexico. Despite the unprecedented weather, migrants continue to attempt to cross the dangerous river to reach the U.S.

The child was with his family attempting to cross the river when he drowned on Wednesday, just as Texas was gripped by Arctic conditions which have killed more than 30 people and left millions in Mexico and Texas without power, water and food. The boy’s parents and sister apparently made it to the U.S., but were returned to Mexico by U.S. Border Patrol.

According to Mexican immigration officials, the boy “couldn’t withstand the pounding water, which covered him and kept him submerged for several meters”. His body was recovered but attempts to revive him were unsuccessful.

The Rio Grande is notoriously dangerous for people attempting to cross the border.

The journey across the Rio Grande has always been a perilous one, with hundreds of people, many of whom could not swim, having drowned over the years after being caught by the deceptively deep waters and strong current.

Add in the current winter storm currently blanketing the entire state of Texas, has produced significant snow and prolonged freezing temperatures, has made the crossing even more dangerous.

In fact, earlier in the week, the river had claimed another victim. A woman from Venezuela died trying to cross the river in the same area after getting trapped in below-freezing currents. Three others suffered hypothermia: one was treated by the Red Cross in Mexico, while the other two made it the US border.

Drownings are just one of the dangers migrants face.

Apart from the potential for drownings, migrants face a wide range of dangerous while attempting to cross from Mexico into the U.S. In late January, 19 bodies were found shot and burned in a vehicle near the town of Camargo, also across the border from Texas.

There’s also the threat of violence from drug cartels and smugglers, corrupt officials, and other extreme elements, such as heat during the summer.

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