things that matter

ICE Has Released Their First Weekly List Of Crimes Committed By Undocumented People

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Earlier this week, Immigration and Customs Enforcement has finally released their first weekly roundup of crimes committed by undocumented immigrants. The list doesn’t include names of the people charged and convicted of crimes. Instead, it points the finger at sanctuary cities for releasing people and declining requests of detention to help ICE round up people for deportation.

According to the ICE website, the list is a part of Executive Order 13768, “Enhancing Public Safety in the Interior of the United States,” which was signed by President Trump on Jan. 25, 2017. Critics of the list have been vocal about the similarities between ICE’s list and the lists published about Jewish people during World War II in Nazi-occupied territories in Europe.

Here’s why ICE claims you should care:


“In some cases, state or local laws, ordinances, or policies restrict or prohibit cooperation with ICE,” reads the ICE Declined Detainer Outcome Report FAQs section. “In other cases, jurisdictions choose to willfully decline ICE detainers and release criminals back into the community. The results in both cases are the same: aliens released onto the streets to potentially reoffend or harm individuals living within our communities.”

The crimes included in the list range from “liquor” to “homicide” with a couple listed as “traffic offense.” More than 140 of the immigrants included in the list come from Travis County State Jail, which is located in Austin, Texas. It is important to note that federal agents alerted judges in Texas that sweeping raids were underway as retribution for Austin’s sanctuary policies, not as part of a routine sweep as ICE publicly claimed. Out of the 206 immigrants listed, 148 are Mexican nationals. It is also important to note that not all of the people on the list have been convicted. Out of the 206 people mentioned, only 116 have been charged with a crime.

ICE and Trump have been trying to tell the American people that where there are immigrants or undocumented immigrants, there is also an increase in crime rates. However, several studies definitively disprove those claims. Furthermore, federal courts have ruled that people cannot be detained for longer than their jail sentence to comply with an immigration detainer as it is in violation of their 4th Amendment rights.

You can see the full list here.


READ: People Are Turning To Twitter To Express How They Feel About The 23-Year-Old Who Was Taken By ICE

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These Books By Peruvian Authors Spoke To Me In A Way No Others Could

things that matter

These Books By Peruvian Authors Spoke To Me In A Way No Others Could

Credit: @abriildan / Instagram

When I was a kid, my father always told me that two things would expand my mind: traveling and books. I figured I could just read way to other countries and kill two birds with one stone (right?!). I’ve read most of the American classics like “To Kill A Mockingbird,” “The Great Gatsby,” “The Catcher In The Rye,” and “Of Mice And Men.” But it wasn’t until I was about 18 that my father began introducing me to Peruvian classics. He told me these were our authentic stories…

1. “La Ciudad Y Los Perros” (The Time Of The Hero) by Mario Vargas Llosa

Mario Vargas Llosa is one of the most famous Peruvian authors. This story focuses around a group of teens that attend the same military school my dad went to in his teens, so this is especially close to his heart. This is a coming-of-age story for teenage boys who had to face what every teen boy deals with – on top of racism and white privilege in 1950s Peru. In the book we follow how these young boys had to cope with being outcasts and outsiders in their own country.

2. “Un Mundo Para Julius” (A World For Julius) by Alfredo Bryce Echenique

I’ll try not to be a cornball, but this story really does have the power to remind a reader about the true riches in life: family, people, time spent. “Un Mundo Para Julius” is a daring story that exposes high society’s priorities in 1960s Peru. Julius is a little boy growing up in a wealthy family. His dad is too busy working and his mom is too busy socializing so he becomes incredibly close to his nanny. This hits close to home for a lot of us, because while our parents may not have been high society, they were busy working so some of us were raised by our abuelitas.

 3. “El Mundo Es Ancho y Ajeno” (Broad and Alien Is The World) by Ciro Alegria

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#ciroalegria #elmundoesanchoyajeno

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Author, Ciro Alegria, was an advocate for indigenous rights and the protection of native land. The story is about the perseverance of the main character and his fight to protect his land from landowners of European descent. The book explores the exploitation of Peruvian Indians, and the racism and discrimination the poor townspeople experienced. We follow the unfortunate road of Indians who tried to repair their lives and cultures with the very little they were left with. While this story was written in 1941, the similarities we can see in America and shocking and a true eye opener.

 4. “Los Ríos Profundos” (Deep Rivers) by José María Arguedas

This story follows an Indian teenage boy who travels to the Andes (Cuzco, to be exact) with his father in hopes of finding a job for his dad. There, the boy enrolls in a Catholic school and lives through suffering, violence, discrimination and pain. The book questions Catholicism in Peru while encouraging the determination and individualism of self-awareness, power, and decision-making. It is a rebellious and unconventional story, a symbolism for growing up and sometimes having to go against society’s standards.

5. “Los Heraldos Negros” (The Black Heralds) by César Vallejo

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#cesarvallejo

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If you’re a poet, enjoy poetry or have simply ever been in love and heartbroken, you should probably check this guy out. César Vallejo was considered one of the greatest poets of the twentieth century. His work was known for making pain and suffering poetic. As a poet, he dared to explore the darkness of a human being without ever admitting to further understanding or insight on it. After every stanza and line, he questions existence, pain and evolution, only to end up with no answered questions at the end of each poem. This signified the road a human must take in life, we may search the meaning in things forever, only to be left with more questions. His poems were dark, honest, and one of the most vulnerable pieces in Peru at the time.

READ: This Boricua Is Bringing An Indie Bookstore To Her Neighborhood Of 1.4 Million

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