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How To Prep For The ‘March For Our Lives’ Event Happening This Weekend

This Saturday, activists across the globe are turning up for the fight against gun violence and taking part in the worldwide March For Our Lives Event. As you gear up and prepare for the rally, it’s important to know what to expect and have at the ready.

From keeping an I.D. on hand to bringing that weird fanny pack here’s a list of things to do and pack before the protest.

1. Find a march location and decide how you will get there.

March For Our Lives
CREDIT: franklinactivists/ Instagram

This is something you won’t want to leave until the last minute. One million people are expected to attend the event taking place in downtown D.C. alone. For anyone taking part in a march that is located in a big city, be prepared to tackle busy and slightly hairy public transportation systems, particularly because so many people will be trying to go to one place. Plan out safe routes that will help you get to and out of the march once its over.

2. Make it count, remember to sign the petition! (And RSVP)

CREDIT: marchforourlivesdallas / Instagram

Make sure your presence at the rally is known on a platform that’s more valuable. Sign the March For Our Lives petition and make sure to also RSVP for the event. Signatures matter and signing the online petition will help push this movement forward. Don’t forget to continue your efforts after the march by voting and ringing up your local representatives.

3. What to wear, what to wear.

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Stay up to date on the weather and be prepped for unexpected showers and snow. Now is definitely not the time to let the weather rain us out. If you suspect that there could be even a slight drizzle pack a light poncho or raincoat.

4. Pick reliable shoes

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Remember, you’re going on a march. Get your feet into a pair of reliable comfy shoes that you can walk in for hours. Don’t forget to wear cozy socks!

5. Wear the right bag

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 You’ll need a place to AT LEAST keep your I.D., some cash and your cell phone. (If you’re packing rain gear, snacks, and water you’ll also want to have a bag that has space for that.) There’s no better time to wear that fanny pack you’ve been feeling iffy about than now. Or, go for a cross-body bag. Avoid big bulky purses that your mom won’t be around to carry for you, or could get you into trouble with security*.

6. Things to pack.

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Make sure you keep yourself comfy and energetic by packing items that are totally essential! 

7. Bring snacks

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Marches go on for hours. If this is your first time marching make sure you have everything you’ll need to be comfortable and energized. Energy snacks like granola and protein bars are great to bring along, but also be sure to pack water.

8. Pack water.

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You’re going to be walking for a while so it’s important to stay hydrated!

9. Wear your poncho

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Even if you don’t have a poster to bring, your hands will be occupied. Opt for a poncho or coat (bonus points if they have pockets!) instead of an umbrella so you can keep your hands free.

10. Get a portable phone charger.

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 Make sure you have a portable phone charger on hand in case of any emergencies.

11. Bring some signs.

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It’s possible that people will be handing out signs for you to carry at the march, but if you really want to make a statement, make your own!

12. And a teeny first-aid-kit.

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f you wear the right shoes, you probably won’t have to worry too much about blisters. But you can never be too prepared when it comes to Band-Aids.

13. Don’t forget your medication.

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If you need any medication, be sure to bring it with you. You will be allowed to bring medicine through checkpoints, but you can avoid any problems by making sure to keep your medication in their prescription packages and bottles.

14. Bring a bandana just in case.

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We’re hoping to have a peaceful protest this weekend, but just in case things get out of hand, be prepared for worse case scenarios which could include tear gas.

*There probably won’t be tear gas or mace sprayed at the event but canisters will likely be present because of security. In a scenario where tear gas is sprayed, be sure to protect your eyes and lungs. Poor water onto your bandana and hold over your nose and mouth as you leave. Don’t attempt to rinse your eyes out with water, seek medical assistance for this first. Because most of the marches have been approved by the city there will likely be medical personnel at the event you attend. If you suspect tear gas could be sprayed at your event, consider wearing glasses instead of contacts.

15. Pack your identification.

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Having your I.D. on hand is important for everyone, but for trans marchers, it is doubly important that you have identification that matches your gender identity should you run into any emergencies.

16.Stay safe.

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You’ll always want to bring safety to your march, you never know what could happen.

17. Bring a buddy.

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When you go to a big event like this you should never go alone. Stay safe and make sure you have at least one friend who can keep an out for you and vice versa. The buddy system is crucial here.

18. Have a plan

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Hopefully, you won’t get separated from a friend, but there’s a slight chance that you will. Have a plan of where and what time to meet your friends if you do get separated and someone’s phone dies (bring that charger!)

19. Stay away from counter-protesters.

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Anyone who shows up to the march this weekend to counter-protest is looking for a confrontation. Don’t engage with anyone who yells at you or attempts to get violent.

20. Know where your exit points are.

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Again all should run smoothly over the weekend, but should anything negative go down be sure to have an exit strategy. Once you arrive at the march have an idea of where your best exit points are around you to get away if anything happens.

21. Bring your voice.

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Unless you’re a march organizer you can probably leave your megaphone at home, but definitely bring your voice!

22. Send us your pics!

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Don’t forget to share your pics and videos from the march with FIERCE. Send us your photos with the hashtag #FIERCEESMarch and post your images in our comments section on FB!


Read: Survivor Of Florida School Shooting Emma Gonzalez Is Turning Her Anger Into Political Activism

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Thousands Took To The Streets In Washington And Across The Country To Join The March For Our Lives Revolution

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Thousands Took To The Streets In Washington And Across The Country To Join The March For Our Lives Revolution

March for our Lives / Facebook

Welcome to the revolution.”

With those four words, Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School student Cameron Kasky began the historic March For Our Lives rally in Washington. It’s estimated that at least half a million people gathered in D.C. today with more than 800 related marches happening throughout the country. According to organizers, every state in the America, and every continent except for Antarctica hosted a march in support of gun reform. 

“Look around you,” Kasky said. “We are the change.”

The streets of Washington were filled with young people demonstrating their desire for gun reform.

CREDIT: Facebook/March for our Lives

The protest in Washing — which Parkland students began to plan on the very day they lost 17 of their classmates — has become an undeniable movement who’s message for gun reform will not dim until they see effective change.

The students have been organizing, fundraising, and productively using social media as a tool for a call to action, which has inspired countless to join the fight for gun reform along with them.

Edna Chavez, a 17-year-old from south Los Angeles, was one of the 20 speakers at the rally in Washington.

Here is Chavez’s powerful speech that you will likely see spreading everywhere.

The senior from Manual Arts High School spoke loudly and proudly of her family, her heritage and her hometown. She spoke about her involvement with the Community Coalition organization who has shaped her to be an activist of gun reform after her older brother, Ricardo, died as a result to gun violence.

“That’s why I got involved,” Chavez told the crowd. “I wanted to impact policies and make sure our voices are heard.”

“I am a youth leader,” she added. “I am a survivor.”

Through tears, Chavez went on to speak about her the trauma and the anxiety she has experienced in the aftermath of her brother’s death, which has impacted her entire family.

“You see the melanin on your brother’s skin turn grey,” Chavez said when speaking about her brother’s death.

On the eve of the protest, David Hogg — one of the most vocal leaders from Marjory Stoneman — was asked by Axios what success looked like for him and his classmates. To that complex question, Hogg said: “Simply, a lot of Americans coming out and becoming politically active. This is the start of our marathon.”

People marched and chanted for gun reform.

Just as the Women’s March motivated thousands to attend their inaugural gathering in Washington, the Parkland students have done the same but in a very short amount of time. They garnered support from the Obamas, George Clooney, Oprah, Kanye West and Kim Kardashian West (who attended the Washington event) and many more celebrities who all contributed to their fund. As of today, March For Our Lives has generated $3.4 million dollars.

Today’s rally also included musical performances by Ariana Grande, Common, Miley Cyrus, Jennifer Hudson, and Vic Mensa.

Demi Lovato performed “Skyscraper” between speakers to show her support of the young people seeking change.

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Lovato was one of the first celebrities to reach out to Parkland students and lend her support.

Lin-Manuel Miranda and Ben Platt also performed their new mashup single “Found/Tonight.”

Because the march was so detailed in its planning — which included an app that provided information on the event — the city said they’ve been preparing for this for weeks.

“As the young men and women from Parkland, Florida, have been preparing for Saturday’s event, the District has been preparing to keep them safe here in Washington,” D.C. Mayor Muriel E. Bowser said to The Washington Post.

The crowd represented the intersectionality of all the communities impacted by gun violence.

The New York Times reports that counter-protests in support of gun rights would also be taking place in Salt Lake City, Greenville, South Carolina and Helena, Montana.

Emma González used her voice to keep people motivated in the demonstration that last hours in the nation’s capitol.

Undeniably, Emma Gonzalez has become the face and voice of the movement for gun law reform. She has been the outspoken victim of Parkland who is fighting the loudest.

In an essay in Teen Vogue, the 18-year-old high school senior was very direct about their demands.

“We need to digitize gun-sales records, mandate universal background checks, close gun-show loopholes and straw-man purchases, ban high-capacity magazines, and push for a comprehensive assault weapons ban with an extensive buyback system,” Gonzalez writes.

Organizers want the march to increase voter registration among the younger attendees. Protesters, many of which attended the National Walk Out Day on March 14, have threatened GOP lawmakers that if they don’t make changes to the country’s gun laws they will “vote them out.”

The crowd was not shy about calling for people to make it to the polls in November.

“I want an incredibly large voter registration turnout,” González told MSNBC. “I want people who don’t understand what we’re feeling to come away from this thinking, ‘I might understand this.'”

The march in Washington was accompanied by hundreds of sister marches across the world on 6 continents.

Here’s some scenes of today’s historic March For Our Lives throughout the country and worldwide.

CREDIT: Twitter/@FoxNews

Houston

ABC13 reports that thousands attended the rally at Tranquility Park near City Hall.

Miami

CREDIT: Twitter/Victor Oquendo

Hundreds of thousands attended various rallies held in Miami and in South Florida, according to CBS Miami.

Nashville

An estimated, 10,000 people descended in downtown Nashville and marched to the Davidson County Courthouse, WSMV reports.

Raleigh, NC

Los Angeles

It’s being projected that 60,000 people will take to the streets of Los Angeles demanding gun control.

Chicago

https://twitter.com/jensgriffin/status/977574071469793281

Thousands gathered in Union Park in downtown Chicago.

San Francisco

Hundreds of thousands gathered in San Francisco and throughout the Bay Area.

New York City

Hundreds of thousands marched through the streets of New York City, which included many famous faces.

“One of my best friends was killed by gun violence right around here, so it’s important to me not just to march today but to take action tomorrow and to have these people to have their voices heard,” Paul McCartney said on CNN.

People are taking to social media to express why they want gun reform.

Many want gun reform so they can live without fear of being killed.

And teachers don’t want to live in constant fear with their students.

Did you march today? If so, share your videos and pictures on social media with #Latinos4GunReform.


READ: Here’s How High School Students Across The Country Used Their Voices To Demonstrate For Gun Control

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