Things That Matter

Here Are 11 Reasons Why People Took To The Streets For The May Day Protests In Downtown L.A.

May Day, or International Workers’ Day, has a long history of being the day that workers worldwide joined together in protests for worker’s rights. This year, thousands of people across the country gathered in cities in 41 different states to demand rights for immigrants in the American workforce. From Seattle to Los Angeles to Miami, people marched for family, friends, and their own rights as immigrant workers in the U.S. Here are some of the people who marched in downtown Los Angeles for May Day and the reason why they took the day to take to the streets.

Diana Medel, 21

Kathryn Boyd-Batstone
CREDIT: Kathryn Boyd-Batstone

“I’m here because I’m a deferred action student. I came here when I was 8. I’m an immigrant worker. I am a field representative for Assemblymember Mike Gibson of the 64th district,” Medel told mitú. “I think it’s very important to be here because we want to show everyone that we are resisting. We’re resisting against the new administration and we’re supporting a new immigration reform.”

Nicholas Maldonado, 23

Kathryn Boyd-Batstone
CREDIT: Kathryn Boyd-Batstone

“I’m just here marching for the gay community and giving everybody a voice and giving my family a voice. They’re just in fear of being deported and so I am just here for them,” Maldonado told mitú. “I think it’s important [to march] because even though we might have taken a few steps backwards, we need to continue to show our voice because change won’t come about if we don’t get up and share a voice and make our voices heard.”

Teisha Rivera (left), 16

Kathryn Boyd-Batstone
CREDIT: Kathryn Boyd-Batstone

“I came here to support my mom. I’m a first-generation Mexican-American and my mom (pictured center), my dad and my auntie too (pictured left), they crossed the border. I came here to support them,” Rivera told mitú. “For me, it’s important for people to come and support their beliefs. The U.S. has a freedom of speech and that’s what we love. Not like in other countries where they don’t. Right here, we have the opportunity that in other countries they might not have. That’s why I think it’s important.”

Cesar Gonzalez, 40

Kathryn Boyd-Batstone
CREDIT: Kathryn Boyd-Batstone

“I’m here to unite with everyone else and to stand up for the history of May Day and the fights and struggles that many in the working class have had to go through. I stand with everyone now who feels like they are getting treated unfairly in the workplace and the administration that we have now has been a failure so that has urged me to get out with everyone,” Gonzalez told mitú. “[I march for] some of the legendary figures like Cesar Chavez. I think about what he did for people in history and many of the people that have come to this country, immigrants that have come to work here and perhaps do not get acknowledged as hardworking.”

Lea Gonzalez, 26

Kathryn Boyd-Batstone
CREDIT: Kathryn Boyd-Batstone

“I am participating as a daughter of immigrants that migrated here during the civil war of El Salvador. I feel like I have a need and a responsibility to be out here for the immigrant community,” Gonzalez told mitú. “I definitely march or my family that recently arrived from El Salvador do to the current violence that they are suffering. It is important to be here because if you don’t do it, who is going to march for us. I feel like I need to do it for them because they have that fear to be out in the streets and so I have the right to do it and express myself so I have to do it for them.”

Jairo Loaeza (center), 14

Kathryn Boyd-Batstone
CREDIT: Kathryn Boyd-Batstone

“We come representing Clinica Romero because we support and believe that everybody should have justice because we have human rights,” Loaeza told mitú. “I think about my parents because both of them are immigrants and every morning I wake up fearing that they may not return home and it’s scary to think that and I think we should all have justice. It’s important because this will give us a chance to say what we think and give them a chance to hear us.”

Maii Ware, 29

Kathryn Boyd-Batstone
CREDIT: Kathryn Boyd-Batstone

“I think about the undocumented families that are being separated,” Ware told mitú about why she marched. “I am not of Hispanic descent but my daughter is undocumented so that’s an issues that hits close to home to me. People are losing momentum and it’s important to have rest periods to rebuild strength again but I think that May Day is a international holiday for us to show up and do that.”

Edwin Peraza, 31

Kathryn Boyd-Batstone
CREDIT: Kathryn Boyd-Batstone

“I’m here to fight because my parents came here as immigrants,” Peraza told mitú. “I feel like this country is very anti-immigrant, especially with this current administration, so I think we just got to voice that we are here. I march because there are people who feel more passionate and they organize these types of events and they ask for support and I am here giving support. Especially since I have been part of the immigrant community for such a long time.”

Jorge Cortez, 36

Kathryn Boyd-Batstone
CREDIT: Kathryn Boyd-Batstone

“I was an undocumented immigrant to this country. I came from El Salvador back in the early 80s. My family really fought hard to give me an opportunity that we didn’t have back in El Salvador,” Cortez told mitú. “I became the first person in my family to graduate from college and the first person to get my masters as well. I am here to represent all these individuals that represent that through hard work we are citizens of this country and we definitely contribute in ways that people like Donald Trump are really not talking about.”

Martha Friedman, 25

Kathryn Boyd-Batstone
CREDIT: Kathryn Boyd-Batstone

“I’m marching here today because I feel like we are regressing instead of progressing and [I’m here] to represent my family who immigrated here,” Friedman told mitú. “I am an immigrant myself. I went to school, worked hard and I have two children who are in school right now. I didn’t allow them to miss school because education is important. We have a goal to reach and I’m here to support my community and my parents who left everything behind.”

Nizgui Gomez, 15

Kathryn Boyd-Batstone
CREDIT: Kathryn Boyd-Batstone

“I think what Trump is doing is not right. We’re all a part of this and all the immigrants contribute to this country. It’s not fair that he is supporting and saying bad stuff about us,” Gomez told mitú. “I am here to march for the immigrants and my family members who are immigrants. A lot of families could be separated. My parents are immigrants and one of these days I could be separated from them and I don’t think it’s fair that I, a 15-year-old, should be scared of that. It’s important to take a stand because what else can we do besides take a stand and fight for what’s right for us.”


Donate $11 today to help the undocumented immigrants in our community: #11FOR11MILLION

READ: 11 People Told Us Why They Went To The Day Without A Woman Rally In Los Angeles

Share this story with all of your friends by tapping that little share button below!

Notice any needed corrections? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com

New Netflix Docuseries Explores The Summer The Night Stalker Terrorized Los Angeles

Entertainment

New Netflix Docuseries Explores The Summer The Night Stalker Terrorized Los Angeles

Bettmann / Getty Images

Richard Ramirez, a.k.a. The Night Stalker, spent the summer of 1985 terrorizing Los Angeles. Ramirez murdered 13 people during his reign of terror in Southern California. Netflix’s new docuseries is exploring the crime by interviewing law enforcement and family of the victims.

“Night Stalker: The Hunt For a Serial” killer is now streaming on Netflix.

“Night Stalker: The Hunt For a Serial Killer” is the latest Netflix docuseries diving into the true crimes that have shaped American society. Richard Ramirez is one of the most prolific serial killers of all time and single-handedly terrorized Los Angeles during the summer of 1985.

Ramirez fundamentally changed Los Angeles and the people who live there. The serial killer was an opportunistic killer. He would break into homes using unlocked doors and opened windows. Once inside, he would rape, murder, rob, and assault the people inside the home.

The documentary series explores just how Ramirez was able to keep law enforcement at bay for so long. The killer did not have a standard modus operandi. His victims ran the gamut of gender, age, and race. There was no indicator as to who could be next. He also rarely used the same weapon when killing his victims. Some people were stabbed to death while others were strangled and others still were bludgeoned.

While not the first telling of Ramirez’s story, it is the most terrifying account to date.

“Victims ranged in age from 6 to 82,” director Tiller Russell told PEOPLE. “Men, women, and children. The murder weapons were wildly different. There were guns, knives, hammers, and tire irons. There was this sort of feeling that whoever you were, that anybody could be a victim and anybody could be next.”

Family members of the various victims speak in the documentary series about learning of the horror committed to them. People remember grandparents and neighbors killed by Ramirez. All the while, police followed every lead to make sure they left no stone unturned.

“Night Stalker: The Hunt For a Serial Killer” is now streaming on Netflix.

READ: Here’s How An East LA Neighborhood Brought Down One Of America’s Most Notorious Serial Killers

Notice any needed corrections? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com

President Joe Biden Signs Executive Order To Preserve DACA

Things That Matter

President Joe Biden Signs Executive Order To Preserve DACA

Chip Somodevilla / Getty Images

January 22, 2021

The Trump administration spent years trying to end Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA). The Obama-era program was important in helping young undocumented adults who came to the country when they were children. President Joe Biden has restored it.

President Joe Biden has restored DACA to its original 2012 form.

President Biden was with President Obama when DACA was passed to protect the young adults who benefit from the program. President Biden’s executive order is giving hundreds of thousands of young adults protections and the ability to work once again.

“This memorandum, known as the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) guidance, deferred the removal of certain undocumented immigrants who were brought to the United States as children, have obeyed the law, and stayed in school or enlisted in the military,” reads the memorandum posted on the White House website. “DACA and associated regulations permit eligible individuals who pass a background check to request temporary relief from removal and to apply for temporary work permits. DACA reflects a judgment that these immigrants should not be a priority for removal based on humanitarian concerns and other considerations and that work authorization will enable them to support themselves and their families, and to contribute to our economy, while they remain.”

Original: During the 2020 election, Latinos were a massive electoral voting bloc. In fact, for the first time ever, the Latino vote outnumbered the Black vote. According to the Pew Research Center, there are now 32 million eligible Latino voters and that accounts for 13 percent of all eligible voters. 

And, Latinos helped deliver the presidency to Joe Biden. So it can be expected that the community has high expectations for Joe Biden to deliver on his campaign promises of immigration reform.

During a recent speech about his first 100 days in office, Joe Biden outlined his priorities once he’s sworn in on January 20th, and said he would “immediately” send an immigration bill to congress.

Joe Biden promises swift action on immigration reform as soon as he takes office.

Over the weekend, President-Elect Joe Biden promised he would take swift action when it comes to immigration reform and rolling back many of the cruel and dangerous policies put into place by the Trump administration.

“I will introduce an immigration bill immediately,” he said in a news conference on Friday.

Although he didn’t go into detail regarding the proposed legislation, he’s previously committed to ending Trump’s ban on immigration from predominantly Muslim nations, and that he wants a path to citizenship for Dreamers, and an increase in guest worker permits to help bring undocumented agricultural workers – many of whom are now considered “essential workers” – out of the shadows.

Biden had already promised an immigration overhaul within the first 100 days of his presidency but this commitment definitely increases the pressure on him and congress to get things done.

Biden also said his justice department will investigate the policy of child separation.

During the same press conference, Biden said that his Justice Department will determine responsibility for the family separation program, which led to more than 2,600 children being taken from caregivers after crossing the U.S. southern border, and whether it was criminal.

“There will be a thorough, thorough investigation of who is responsible, and whether or not the responsibility is criminal,” Biden said. That determination will be made by his attorney general-designate, Merrick Garland, he added.

During the campaign, Biden finally took responsibility for many of his administration’s immigration failures.

Nicknamed the “Deporter in Chief,” Obama deported more immigrants than any other president in U.S. history with over 3 million deportations during his time in office. 

But as part of that administration, Joe Biden is also complicit. That’s why during the campaign he seemed to acknowledge at least some of the pain the duo caused.

“Joe Biden understands the pain felt by every family across the U.S. that has had a loved one removed from the country, including under the Obama-Biden Administration, and he believes we must do better to uphold our laws humanely and preserve the dignity of immigrant families, refugees, and asylum-seekers,” Biden’s immigration plan reads. 

While Obama’s methods pale in comparison to the cruel tactics like family separation, inhumane conditions, and targeted raids, the impact the deportations have had on families is cannot be quantified.

Biden, like any Vice President, is put in the position of having to defend his president, but also himself as the future president. This isn’t a bad thing, Biden must distinguish himself from his predecessor but if the shadow of Obama’s legacy is buying him goodwill, it might be difficult to undermine that administration’s stances.

Notice any needed corrections? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com