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Here Are 11 Reasons Why People Took To The Streets For The May Day Protests In Downtown L.A.

Kathryn Boyd-Batstone

May Day, or International Workers’ Day, has a long history of being the day that workers worldwide joined together in protests for worker’s rights. This year, thousands of people across the country gathered in cities in 41 different states to demand rights for immigrants in the American workforce. From Seattle to Los Angeles to Miami, people marched for family, friends, and their own rights as immigrant workers in the U.S. Here are some of the people who marched in downtown Los Angeles for May Day and the reason why they took the day to take to the streets.

Diana Medel, 21

Kathryn Boyd-Batstone
CREDIT: Kathryn Boyd-Batstone

“I’m here because I’m a deferred action student. I came here when I was 8. I’m an immigrant worker. I am a field representative for Assemblymember Mike Gibson of the 64th district,” Medel told mitú. “I think it’s very important to be here because we want to show everyone that we are resisting. We’re resisting against the new administration and we’re supporting a new immigration reform.”

Nicholas Maldonado, 23

Kathryn Boyd-Batstone
CREDIT: Kathryn Boyd-Batstone

“I’m just here marching for the gay community and giving everybody a voice and giving my family a voice. They’re just in fear of being deported and so I am just here for them,” Maldonado told mitú. “I think it’s important [to march] because even though we might have taken a few steps backwards, we need to continue to show our voice because change won’t come about if we don’t get up and share a voice and make our voices heard.”

Teisha Rivera (left), 16

Kathryn Boyd-Batstone
CREDIT: Kathryn Boyd-Batstone

“I came here to support my mom. I’m a first-generation Mexican-American and my mom (pictured center), my dad and my auntie too (pictured left), they crossed the border. I came here to support them,” Rivera told mitú. “For me, it’s important for people to come and support their beliefs. The U.S. has a freedom of speech and that’s what we love. Not like in other countries where they don’t. Right here, we have the opportunity that in other countries they might not have. That’s why I think it’s important.”

Cesar Gonzalez, 40

Kathryn Boyd-Batstone
CREDIT: Kathryn Boyd-Batstone

“I’m here to unite with everyone else and to stand up for the history of May Day and the fights and struggles that many in the working class have had to go through. I stand with everyone now who feels like they are getting treated unfairly in the workplace and the administration that we have now has been a failure so that has urged me to get out with everyone,” Gonzalez told mitú. “[I march for] some of the legendary figures like Cesar Chavez. I think about what he did for people in history and many of the people that have come to this country, immigrants that have come to work here and perhaps do not get acknowledged as hardworking.”

Lea Gonzalez, 26

Kathryn Boyd-Batstone
CREDIT: Kathryn Boyd-Batstone

“I am participating as a daughter of immigrants that migrated here during the civil war of El Salvador. I feel like I have a need and a responsibility to be out here for the immigrant community,” Gonzalez told mitú. “I definitely march or my family that recently arrived from El Salvador do to the current violence that they are suffering. It is important to be here because if you don’t do it, who is going to march for us. I feel like I need to do it for them because they have that fear to be out in the streets and so I have the right to do it and express myself so I have to do it for them.”

Jairo Loaeza (center), 14

Kathryn Boyd-Batstone
CREDIT: Kathryn Boyd-Batstone

“We come representing Clinica Romero because we support and believe that everybody should have justice because we have human rights,” Loaeza told mitú. “I think about my parents because both of them are immigrants and every morning I wake up fearing that they may not return home and it’s scary to think that and I think we should all have justice. It’s important because this will give us a chance to say what we think and give them a chance to hear us.”

Maii Ware, 29

Kathryn Boyd-Batstone
CREDIT: Kathryn Boyd-Batstone

“I think about the undocumented families that are being separated,” Ware told mitú about why she marched. “I am not of Hispanic descent but my daughter is undocumented so that’s an issues that hits close to home to me. People are losing momentum and it’s important to have rest periods to rebuild strength again but I think that May Day is a international holiday for us to show up and do that.”

Edwin Peraza, 31

Kathryn Boyd-Batstone
CREDIT: Kathryn Boyd-Batstone

“I’m here to fight because my parents came here as immigrants,” Peraza told mitú. “I feel like this country is very anti-immigrant, especially with this current administration, so I think we just got to voice that we are here. I march because there are people who feel more passionate and they organize these types of events and they ask for support and I am here giving support. Especially since I have been part of the immigrant community for such a long time.”

Jorge Cortez, 36

Kathryn Boyd-Batstone
CREDIT: Kathryn Boyd-Batstone

“I was an undocumented immigrant to this country. I came from El Salvador back in the early 80s. My family really fought hard to give me an opportunity that we didn’t have back in El Salvador,” Cortez told mitú. “I became the first person in my family to graduate from college and the first person to get my masters as well. I am here to represent all these individuals that represent that through hard work we are citizens of this country and we definitely contribute in ways that people like Donald Trump are really not talking about.”

Martha Friedman, 25

Kathryn Boyd-Batstone
CREDIT: Kathryn Boyd-Batstone

“I’m marching here today because I feel like we are regressing instead of progressing and [I’m here] to represent my family who immigrated here,” Friedman told mitú. “I am an immigrant myself. I went to school, worked hard and I have two children who are in school right now. I didn’t allow them to miss school because education is important. We have a goal to reach and I’m here to support my community and my parents who left everything behind.”

Nizgui Gomez, 15

Kathryn Boyd-Batstone
CREDIT: Kathryn Boyd-Batstone

“I think what Trump is doing is not right. We’re all a part of this and all the immigrants contribute to this country. It’s not fair that he is supporting and saying bad stuff about us,” Gomez told mitú. “I am here to march for the immigrants and my family members who are immigrants. A lot of families could be separated. My parents are immigrants and one of these days I could be separated from them and I don’t think it’s fair that I, a 15-year-old, should be scared of that. It’s important to take a stand because what else can we do besides take a stand and fight for what’s right for us.”


Donate $11 today to help the undocumented immigrants in our community: #11FOR11MILLION

READ: 11 People Told Us Why They Went To The Day Without A Woman Rally In Los Angeles

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The Technology Behind This Bra Is As Mind Blowing As The Mexican Teen Who Invented It

Things That Matter

The Technology Behind This Bra Is As Mind Blowing As The Mexican Teen Who Invented It

HIGIA / GSEA / FACEBOOK
JRC
Credit: Bulmario Tapia / Facebook

Seventeen-year-old Julian Rios Cantu just brought home $20,000 from the Global Student Entrepreneur Awards for his invention: EVA, a bra that uses biosensors to detect early signs of breast cancer.

EVA, which earned Rios Cantu the title of best enterprising student in the world, is expected to help diagnose women predisposed to breast cancer. Though EVA is the result of more than a year of research, and the aid of several great minds, Cantu’s journey with breast cancer began when it nearly killed someone very close to him.

Rios Cantu was only 13 when his mother, Graciela, was first diagnosed with breast cancer.


Though her first diagnosis was caught early, El Universal reported, doctors still had to remove her breast to fight off the cancer. Her second diagnosis was caught at a late stage, causing her and her family to endure the effects of intense treatment. To save her life, doctors removed her other breast. In Mexico, Graciela’s story is not uncommon. As Infobae reported, in Mexico, a woman is diagnosed with breast cancer every 30 minutes, according to the Ministry of Health.

As El Universal reported, a major problem in Mexico is that the resources for diagnosis are limited as compared to the potential number of patients.

At the age of 17, Rios Cantu formed Higia Technologies with three other friends.

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HIGIA.COM

With the help of his friend, Rios Cantu, an engineering student and Higia’s CEO and co-founder, spent more than a year developing the technology necessary to make EVA a reality. According to Higia, the “Breast cancer detection bra” is “equipped with tactile sensors to map the surface of the breast and the surrounding areas.” The biosensors measure temperature, and because tumors require blood, it leads to increased blood flow, which creates a higher temperature in the affected breast.

The bra collects data for analysis on app or computer, Infobae reported.

JULIAN RIOS CANTU / YOUTUBE

In order to collect data, the user is expected to wear EVA once a week for 60 to 90 minutes at a time. Rios Cantu explained the motivation for using the bra versus using more traditional methods, saying that a breast self-exam allows for human error that can lead to death. On the other hand, the bra takes into account variables like breast temperature, color, and roughness, and analyzes the data through software to give a diagnosis, El Universal reported.

While EVA is expected to help patients receive an early diagnosis, Dr. Enrique Bargello believes that one of the main challenges facing women in Mexico is education. Early diagnosis is very important for one’s survival and education play a key role in that. For more information, click here.

READ: At 58 Years Old, This Mom Managed To Stay Calm During Labor And Give Birth To Her Twins

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