Things That Matter

Here Are 11 Reasons People Protested For Immigrant Rights On May Day In Los Angeles

May Day has long been about fighting for workers rights around the world especially in the US where cities celebrate and advocate for workers rights. Los Angeles is one of the most notable May Day rallies in the country where people take to the streets to stand up for immigrant and political causes. The city’s population has a long history of advocating for immigrant rights. Here are some of the people that took to the streets in LA and why this day means so much to them.

Maggie Hernandez, 23 and Giselle  Orozco, 19

CREDIT: Javier Rojas/ mitú

“I’m an immigration paralegal so a lot of my clients are undocumented so I’m here to support them,” Hernandez told mitú. “I’m also a DACA recipient and also here for my parents who couldn’t be here today because they’re working.

Carolyn Gomez, 27

CREDIT: Javier Rojas/ mitú

“I’m out here today to stand in solidarity not only for human rights but for a better society,” Gomez told mitú. “I want to see a society where people are treated with respect and dignity regardless of class, age and social status.”

Gerardo Campos, 22

CREDIT: Javier Rojas/ mitú

“Supporting immigrant rights is a must in today’s political climate and is important for all of us acknowledge the people behind the scenes,” Campos told mitú. “Today is a holiday for all workers and I feel like I’m doing my part today fighting for that.”

Alejandra Pacheco, 25

CREDIT: Javier Rojas/ mitú

“I came here today to speak about immigrant rights and to advocate for reform in this country where so many aren’t given a fair chance to have their voice heard,” Pacheco told mitú. “It’s important to have May Day and it’s even more important that we are out here today celebrating it with all these people.”

Gloria Loriva, 63

CREDIT: Javier Rojas/ mitú

“I’m a socialist and I believe that we have to keep marching in the streets for our rights,” Loriva told mitú. “I’ve been an activist for many years, my mother is an immigrant but even if she wasn’t I’d still be out here in the streets marching on May Day.”

Rosie Alonso, 28

CREDIT: Javier Rojas/ mitú

“I came all the way from San Bernardino and I used to live in East Los Angeles so I’m here to speak on behalf of my community,” Alonso told mitú. “I want to protect it from gentrification and the displacement and deportation of so many people that live there including my parents who are both immigrants.”

Chantelle Garcia, 22

CREDIT: Javier Rojas/ mitú

“I always come every May Day all the way back to when I was in the fifth grade and it’s just important to be here and stand up for immigrant rights, ICE, and Donald Trump,” Garcia told mitú.

Irom Thockchom, 20

CREDIT: Javier Rojas/mitú

“I’m a member of the Answer Coalition and we recognize that we are an anti-imperialism organization,” Thockchom told mitú. “Part of our mission is to support labor at home which is what this day is all about and I want to see equal rights for all working people.”

Jenny Chalappa, 22

CREDIT: Javier Rojas/ mitú

“I just wanted to be out here and be part of the change,” Chalappa told mitú. “I’m tired of sitting back and watch everything happen and today is honestly my first May Day. My whole family has always been working class and I just heard about May Day so why not come out support them and all workers.”

Gabriella Vaquerano, 23

CREDIT: Javier Rojas/mitú

“I want change not only for me but for everyone else including families that are too afraid to stand up,” Vaquerano told mitú. “Now that street vending is legal our parents and communities don’t have to be scared to make a living, this is how they live and now we are starting to see some real changes that are going to benefit hard working immigrants.”

Oliver Villanos , 15

CREDIT: Javier Rojas/ mitú

“I’m here to protest for the rights of immigrants and for my family that couldn’t be here today,” Villanos told mitú. “I feel sad that some people are racist to others just because they feel they are not equal to them and I want that change in our country.”


READ: Here Are 25 Of The Best Signs From Nationwide #MarchForOurLives Protests

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Students Hold Sit-In To Protest Teacher Who Told Their Classmate To ‘Go Back To Your Country’

Things That Matter

Students Hold Sit-In To Protest Teacher Who Told Their Classmate To ‘Go Back To Your Country’

A group of students at Nicholas Senn High School in Chicago held a sit-in this week to protest a racist comment made by a gym teacher. According to students, a group of students stayed seated during the national anthem and a gym teacher told a Latina student to “go back to your country” in response.

Nicholas Senn High School students in Chicago held a sit-in to protest a teacher’s offensive comment.

According to NBC News, 17-year-old Yésica Salazar said she was at a Hispanic Heritage Month assembly when the Pledge of Allegiance was performed. She and other students remained seated as a form of protest against the anti-immigration rhetoric and policies in the country.

The incident allegedly occurred as the students were leaving the assembly for not standing. When they left, a teacher stopped the student and told her that she should “go back to your country.”

A video on Twitter shows the principal addressing the protesting students.

“I notified everybody within three hours of receiving the report. It is all in writing,” Principal Mary Beck told the students. “It is all time-stamped. I did my job. I continue to follow through based on the guidelines and policies that we have in place. Every time.”

Despite the answer, the students chanted back at her saying, “So, why is he still here?”

The school is predominately Latino and Black.

Senn High School is predominantly Latino and black. According to data, Nicholas Senn High School is 25.8 percent Black, 42.3 percent Latino, 11.2 percent white, and 17.5 percent Asian.

The “go back to your country” comment has grown in popularity since President Trump took office. There have been examples of comment shared all over social media and is directed to Black, brown, and Asian people. There have even been instances when people have used this phrase against Native American people. To be clear, it has nothing to do with immigration and everything to do with racism.

People on social media are celebrating the students for holding people in power at their school accountable.

What do you think about the protest and response?

READ: Another Sexist Man Has Mocked The Feminist Protest Movement Sweeping Latin America By Dressing Up As A Victim

Woman Reunited With Her Parents Because Of Her Son And The Touching Moment Was Caught On Video

Entertainment

Woman Reunited With Her Parents Because Of Her Son And The Touching Moment Was Caught On Video

The immigrant experience in the U.S. is a plethora of stories with different endings. One common storyline in the current immigration crisis is the separation of families. A viral video of Twitter is showing the immigrant experience in a touching and hopeful way.

Luis Cortes Romero, a DACA recipient in California according to his Twitter bio, posted a video of his mother being reunited with her parents for the first time in 30 years. The video starts with a woman being asked to come into another room. When she rounds the corner, she stops dead in her tracks as she tries to take int eh scene before her. After 30 years, she finally got to see her parents again.

Romero is an attorney and, according to the tweet, he always vowed to bring his grandparents to the U.S. to see their daughter. The moment was captured on video and you can feel the emotions coming through the screen.

Romero briefly described the challenges he faced while getting his grandparents visas to come to the U.S.

Credit: @LCortesRomero / Twitter

A parent’s love is something so special and unconditional. Despite his grandfather being deaf, mute, and illiterate, his grandparents took trips by bus every time they tried for a visa. It took five tries before the couple finally had their visas approved for a visit to the U.S.

The family even got to celebrate his birthday while he was visiting.

Credit: @LCortesRomero / Twitter

The smile on his mom’s face says it all. Imagine having to go 30 years without seeing your parents because of your choice to immigrate or a better life. So many immigrants sacrifice their families, friends, and everything they know in order to achieve a better life for them and their families. The video shows the emotional toll that the immigration experience can take on a family.

People on social media are showering Romero with so much respect.

Credit: @serrrg_ / Twitter

The Twitter video shows so much love and family unity. It is an intimate look into a life so many Americans will never know or experience. One of overwhelming joy following decades of unfathomable sadness and separation.

The cries from the children seeing their parents are something so many of us can relate to.

Credit: @Maryem77104169 / Twitter

Whether or not you have separated from your parents for decades, it is easy to understand the longing for your parents. There is nothing more comforting than being able to see your parents when something goes wrong. There are so many times as adults that we need to rely on our parents, whether we like to acknowledge it or not.

The separation of families is a moment in American history that we will have to face.

Credit: @IamNurseTrish / Twitter

Immigration advocates have called the separation of families at the southern border is damaging. The psychological damage to the children being taken by their parents is devastating.

Way to go, Luis.

Thank you for being such an exceptional son.

READ: This Video Of A Mexicana And Her Parents Reuniting After 23 Years Is A Reminder That Conservatives Have Immigration Wrong