Things That Matter

Here Are 9 Of The Most Heartwarming 2018 World Cup Moments That Fans Have Shared

This year’s FIFA World Cup has been full of glorious moments, from goals in the 90th minute to qualifications that seemed to beat the odds. Add in tales of friends doing the most to help their bffs enjoy the game or opposing sides coming together for the greater good and you have the magic that is ‘the beautiful game.’ The world might be a bit crazy at the moment but there were truly some wonderful moments out of the World Cup. These heartwarming moments during the World Cup so far show soccer really is the universal language.

1. A couple Brazilian buddies signed the game for their deaf and blind friend.

Neymar was brought to tears after scoring the second goal in the Group E match Brazil vs Costa Rica match. However, what is making us grab tissues is the detailed interpretation these friends gave to their blind and deaf friend. An interpreter re-enacts what is happening on a makeshift soccer pitch, and his gestures even describe the emotions of the players. The man’s fellow Brazil fans even play drums to include him in the celebration.

2. Luis Miguel for the W-I-N, always.

EEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEENTRÉGATEEEEE, AÚN NO TE SIENTOOOOOOSígueme en Twitter:https://twitter.com/iLuisMirreyy?s=09

Posted by LuisMirrey on Wednesday, June 27, 2018

One of the dark spots that plagued Mexico fans for years was the common usage of the offensive, homophobic “¡Eeehhh puto!” chant whenever the opposing goalkeeper was getting ready to kick the ball down the field. El Tri players, the Mexican Football Federation and anti-discrimination groups all implored fans to stop the usage of the phrase.

Finally, during this World Cup, the offensive chant seemed to stop, but for one brief moment, it seemed it was all going down the drain. A group of Mexican fans started the “Ehhhh” chant during the Mexico vs Sweden group match and well, *insert cringe here*. However, the joke was on everyone in the stadium and those watching on social media because this creative group of El Tri fans shouted out the lyrics to Luis Miguel’s “Entrégate” song instead.

3. Colombian man learns sign language to re-enact plays on the field in real-time for his blind and deaf friend.

Los Cafeteros were able to come from behind in their group and take the top spot after a win against Senegal, and these two fans in Bogota were there to appreciate every single step—literally. Jose Richard Gallego lost his senses of sight and hearing from a disease during childhood, but his love for soccer never vanished. Once he met Cesar Daza three years ago, the two bonded over fútbol. Daza made the effort to learn sign language to help his friend enjoy the games alongside him.

In real time, Daza was able to recreate the passes, corner kicks and goals that Colombia made to win Poland in their second group match. Watch the pair’s jubilant celebration above to see the new meaning of #friendshipgoals.

4. Mexico and Colombia fans help a man in a wheelchair enjoy the World Cup opening ceremony.

¡Y DICEN QUE ES UN SIMPLE DEPORTE! Aficionados mexicanos y colombianos levantando a un aficionado egipcio con…

Posted by Desmotivaciones Futbol on Friday, June 15, 2018

In one of the first viral photos from the World Cup, Hassan Sedky was lifted up in a wheelchair by a group of fans from Mexico and Colombia that he had just met while celebrating in the revelry that was the opening ceremony of the 2018 FIFA World Cup, he told RT. “Everyone is so friendly, you can really feel the love from everyone around you. It’s just pure happiness,” he said. Sedky may have come to Russia with only one friend, but he left with many others he can now call compas.

5. Colombia fan is inspired by Japan fans after World Cup match.

A Colombia fan went around saying congratulations to Japan fans after the team’s 2-0 win in Colombia’s first match game. “They won but look what they are doing,” the fan can be heard saying in awe of the respect the fans had for the stadium. Trash was quietly and humbly picked up. “This is incredible. […] Discipline. Order. This is what makes them better. This should teach us something. This is who the Japanese are as people and this is why they win.”

6. Fans don’t let fans party alone.

Some opposing sides can get heated and rowdy before a World Cup match, but Peru and Aussie fans were enjoying each other’s company prior to the teams’ final match in Russia. Sure, both sides knew neither one would be moving on to the next round, so might as well be happy before the final moments on the pitch. Wait for it—a kangaroo makes an appearance in a group of Peru fans above.

7. Argentina and Nigeria fans come together after the game.

After a tie with Iceland and a devastating loss to Croatia, Argentina’s hopes of making it to the next round were riding on Nigeria’s second group match. Although the Albiceleste was going to play Nigeria in the final group match, there was time to celebrate the hopes of two teams in one moment.

8. The whole #RivalHug feed is just adorable.

Déjeme soñar. Final ???????? VS ???????? #rivalhug #fifa #rusia2018

A post shared by Walter Javier Torres (@walterjaviertorres) on

When all is said and done, nothing is sweeter than seeing fans who sweated out an intense 90-minute game hug, swap jerseys and celebrate the elation of the World Cup with a fellow rival. If you’re ever having a bad day, just go through the FIFA World Cup #RivalHug feed to help boost your spirits with beautiful displays of camaraderie.

9. And, of course, all of the Mexico and Korea fan celebrations, including this comment thread.

READ: This Is How Panama Celebrated Its First World Cup Goal

We’ve got many more heartwarming moments that are sure to come with multiple rounds left in the FIFA World Cup! Show us how you’re celebrating the games by using #ShowUsYourColors and #WorldCup2018.

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This Indigenous Village In Mexico Trains Their Children As Soldiers To Combat Gang Violence

Things That Matter

This Indigenous Village In Mexico Trains Their Children As Soldiers To Combat Gang Violence

via Getty Images

In the town of Ayahualtempa, Mexico, in the state of Guerrero, reporters see a shocking image whenever they visit. Children armed with guns, trained to defend themselves. The disturbing scene is meant to be shocking. The village of Ayahualtempa is under constant attack. A prominent heroin “corridor”, they are the victims of violence and carnage at the hands of gangsters and the cartel.

In order to gain the Mexican government’s attention, the Ayahualtempa villagers dress their children up as soldiers. Then, they invite the media in.

Ayahualtempa
via Getty Images

When reporters arrive, the children of Ayahualtempa dutifully line up and put on a performance. They march, they show how they would shoot a gun from one knee, or from flat on their bellies. They tell reporters that their mock-violent performance is “so the president sees us and helps us,” as a 12-year-old child named Valentín told the Associated Press.

Because the Mexican government doesn’t protect Ayahualtempa, the display of child soldiers is a form of protest for the small indigenous village. The people of this remote region of Guerrero want protection from the National Guard, and financial help for widows and orphans who have been made so from organized crime.

The villagers don’t trust local authorities, and for good reason. Guerrera is the Mexican state in which 43 teaching students were abducted and killed in an event that is known as the “Iguala mass kidnapping”. Authorities arrested 80 suspects in connection to the event. 44 of them were police officers, working in conjunction with a network of cartels.

Although the demonstrations function largely as a publicity stunt, violence is very much a part of these children’s lives.

via Getty Images

Parents train their children to walk to school with loaded guns, ready to defend themselves against violent gangsters.

The attention-grabbing antics have, to some extent, worked. On one occasion, the government donated some housing material. On another, benefactors gave the community’s orphans and widows scholarships and houses. But as soon as the periodic media storms die down, the federal government continues pretending Ayahualtempa doesn’t exist.

The hypocrisy of the government’s response is frustrating to many. “We’ve normalized that these children don’t eat, are illiterate, are farm workers. We’re used to the Indians dying young, but, ‘How dare they arm them!’” said local human rights activist Abel Barrera to the AP, with a heavy dose of sarcasm.

As for now, until the government moves to protect the community, they say they will continue their demonstrations. “They see that the issue of the children is effective for making people take notice and they think: If that’s what works, we’ll have to keep doing it,” said Barrera.

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Spanish Voiceover Actress For Jessie From Pokémon Dies And Fans Mourn

Entertainment

Spanish Voiceover Actress For Jessie From Pokémon Dies And Fans Mourn

Pokémon fans in Latin America are mourning the death of Diana Pérez, the Spanish-language voice of Jessie of Pokémon’s Team Rocket. The voice actress has been voicing the character since 1997.

Diana Pérez, the voice actress of Team Rocket’s Jessie, died at 51.

Lalo Garza, a famed voice actor in Mexico, confirmed the death of the Pokémon voice actress.

“Rest in peace Diana Pérez, a strong, cultured, intelligent, and very talented woman. You are good now, friend. Nothing hurts anymore. Have a good trip,” reads the tweet.

Pérez has been a staple in the Spanish-language Pokémon fandom for decades.

Pérez was more than just he voice of Jessie. The voice actress was the voice of multiple anime characters including Luffy in One Piece and Kagura in Inuyasha. In recent years, Pérez had started branching out to directing, producing, and other branches in the entertainment industry.

Pérez’s death is being mourned by Pokémon fans outside of the Spanish-language fandom.

Sarah Natochenny is the English voice of Ash Ketchum in the Pokémon series, Jessie’s mortal enemy. The death of Pérez has impacted the larger Pokémon community. Pérez was a pivotal part of the Latin American Pokémon community for decades and her loss has devastated fans.

Descansa en paz, Diana.

There have been no plans announced for a replacement to voice Team Rocket’s Jessie. No official cause of death has been released either. Our hearts and thoughts go out to Pérez’s family and the greater Pokémon community mourning her passing.

READ: I Was Today Years Old When I Found Out This Mexican Pokémon

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