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There Are More Hate Crimes Being Committed In California, And It’s Higher Among Latinos

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A new study has found that hate crimes against Latinos in California continues to grow. According to Hate Crime in California, hate crimes against all minorities in California have increased since President Trump’s 2016 campaign. The study was conducted by the office of California Attorney General Xavier Becerra in conjunction with four justice centers. The examples of the increased hostility against Latinos in California are easy to come by. There was the elote street vendor who had his cart thrown over by an upset pedestrian. An LA Times writer was yelled at in a park for speaking Spanish to her child. A 92-year-old grandfather was attacked with a piece of concrete while being told to go back to his country.

Hate Crime in California shows that while hate crimes in the U.S. have increased in the past year, California in particular has seen a 17 percent jump in hate crimes against all minorities. For Latinos, there was a 51.8 percent increase in hate crimes since President Trump won the presidency. The report also shows that violent hate crime offenses have increased 12.1 percent in the Golden State.

Some people blame the increase of hate crimes on the rhetoric from President Trump demonizing the Latino community.

“There is a rhetoric, and we’ve actually witnessed some of this coming from the administration,” Maria Hinojosa told NPR about the hate crime increases. “So when you have members of the administration, including the president, calling specifically Latino/Latina immigrants infiltrators, vermin, animals, then I’m sure there are many people who say, well, wait a second – us, too. And how do you challenge that?”

Studies have shown that Latinos in particular do not report crimes regularly out of fear of the police and deportation. Some police officers have even threatened undocumented people with deportation if they report crimes that have been committed against them. Which means, the 52 percent figure reported by the Justice Department is probably a lot lower than it would be if Latinos reported crimes committed against them.

“Right around when the administration changed, we noticed an uptick at local, statewide and national levels of people reporting that they were victims of hate-related speech, and hate crimes,” Teresa Drenick, deputy district attorney for Alameda County, told The Mercury News.

You can read the entire report about California hate crimes here.


READ: White California Woman Calls Latino Man ‘Rapist And Animal’ Because He’s Mexican

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Deportees Sent To Mexico Are Being Given A Chance To Join Mexico's Growing Tech Industry

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Deportees Sent To Mexico Are Being Given A Chance To Join Mexico’s Growing Tech Industry

@marcetorresg / Twitter

For many young deportees and immigrants returning to Mexico finding a job is a hard task. Especially for those that who have spent significant amounts of time in the U.S. That difficulty is compounded when they find out the education they received in the U.S. doesn’t always transferHola Code, a tech boot camp based in Mexico City, is trying to change that by giving deportees and immigrants skills and networking opportunities in the tech industry. The company got its start in 2017 and has taken advantage of the growing demand for software engineers and the enormous potential talent of youth in Mexico.

The average student at Hola Code is 18-35 years old and has been living within the U.S. for about a decade or longer.

Hola Code, designed after Hack Reactor, a popular coding school in San Francisco, throws students into an intensive 20-week course that trains them in tech and prepares them to be placed in high paying tech jobs. Students receive a monthly stipend while attending the training. Students also do not have to pay for the tuition until they secure a job as software engineers after graduating and are making at least 20,000 Mexican pesos a month.

Many participants in the program are former Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) beneficiaries that have either been deported or returned to Mexico.

Many of the students in the program are former participants of DACA, the U.S. immigration policy that protects young undocumented immigrants from deportation. Since the uncertainty that the policy would survive due to the Trump administration, young people have either been deported or returned to Mexico looking for job opportunities that they couldn’t obtain in the U.S.

Jobs are opening as a result of Mexico’s recent leaps in the tech industry.

Marcela Torres, one of the founders of Hola Code, says the young people taking on the program are finding opportunities they may have never found if they stayed in the U.S. “We were given this gift from the United States,” Torres told MarketPlace.org .”I know it’s horrible to say it that way, because I know they miss it, and they call it home. But if Mexico really took the opportunity and used their potential, it could be endless.”

The cost for students to attend Hola Code? Nothing.

Hola Code is creating a culture of building community and ensuring the company can continue to give this life changing opportunity to others. The salary graduates receive is a life changing amount of money in a country with a struggling economy.

Students who have completed the program at Hola Code have found jobs they could never imagine.

Eddy Barranon, who grew up in Illinois, was deported to Mexico City last year. He is a student at Hola Code who faced uncertainty when he first arrived in Mexico. After he finished the program, he became one of many students who have not only found a job in the tech industry but have found themselves.

“Now that I’m back in Mexico and actually being someone, and having a career, it’s awesome,” Barranon told CGTN America. “It’s something that I never thought I would have because of the chances I didn’t have over there in the United States.”


READ: This Organization Is Offering Undocumented Immigrants Facing Deportation Free Legal Help

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