things that matter

Here’s Why Haiti Is Reaching Out To Mexico To Build Up Their Diplomatic Relationship

Guillermo Arias / Getty

Mexico has seen a steady stream of Haitian migrants entering the country since the 2010 earthquake that devastated Port Au Prince, Haiti. Many originally tried to settle in Brazil after the earthquake but the country’s recession prompted many to make the voyage to the United States, according to NPR. In 2016, according to TIME Magazine, the United States saw a spike in Haitian migrants trying to enter the country via Mexico. While some were allowed to come into the U.S. on humanitarian visas, the program ended in late 2016, leaving thousands of Haitians stuck in Mexico, particularly Tijuana. With no way into the U.S. and a country that has seen one natural disaster after another, these migrants have been left in limbo as they try to figure out what to do next.

In response to a change in U.S. immigration policies affecting Haitian migrants and the state of their island nation, Mexico has started to regularize some of the migrants, according to Haiti Libre. Regularizing, according to the Migration Policy Institute, is a way of integrating migrants into a country’s system. It’s also referred to as amnesty, normalization or legalization. Haiti Libre reports that almost 77 percent of Haitian immigrants have been regularized in Mexico. The minister of Haitians Living Abroad, Stéphanie Auguste, is asking Mexico for help with the diaspora.

The request to build a stronger partnership with Mexico comes at a time when Haitian migrants are waiting for long periods of time to get entry to the U.S. under asylum or refugee status. The Diaspora Support Initiatives Project for Local and Regional Authorities would set up a support network for Haitians living in Mexico because of these long wait times. According to Haiti Libre, Minister Auguste met with Mexican Ambassador Jose Luis Alvaro to discuss the plan. Alvaro said he would follow up on a plan to create such a system.

You can read more about the diaspora program and Haiti’s plea with Mexico here.


READ: Here’s What It’s Like To Be A Black Migrant In Mexico

Share this story with all of your friends by tapping that little share button below!

ICE Raids Ordered To Begin On Sunday In Major Cities

Things That Matter

ICE Raids Ordered To Begin On Sunday In Major Cities

Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) is reportedly planning a raid in the early morning hours on Sunday in 10 cities.

It is being reported that the raids will target more than 2,000 families in cities with large migrant populations including Chicago, Los Angeles, Miami, and Houston, according to officials who remain anonymous.

Trump tweeted on Monday that ICE would begin deporting millions of undocumented immigrants throughout the U.S.

More than “1 million” undocumented immigrants “have been issued final deportation orders by federal judges yet remain at large in the country” and called enforcing those judicial orders a “top priority” for ICE, a senior administration official told CNN.

They are allegedly planning to use hotel rooms to house everyone until the family can be deported together and say they might even arrest individuals that can’t be deported immediately. They will most likely be released with ankle monitors, in cases such as parents whose children are U.S. citizens.

Miami is reportedly one of the first cities that’ll be raided, according to the Miami Herald, and the other cities are Atlanta, Baltimore, Denver, New Orleans, New York City, and San Francisco.

Those who will allegedly be targeted include minors who came into the U.S. without their parents and have since turned 18; people who were ordered removed in absentia; and people who missed a court hearing and failed to respond to letters from the Department of Justice (DOJ). Additionally, families on the “rocket docket,” a set of deportation cases fast-tracked for by the DOJ.

There are around 52,000 single adults in ICE custody overall, mostly those who came from the border, according to CNN.

Many are saying Trump’s push for deportations, including essentially outing the raid, are part of his reelection bid due to his poor record.

The inhumane treatment of immigrants in detention centers has been well documented, with a spread of illness leading to many unnecessary deaths, including those of children.

Recently the American Civil Liberties Union  ACLU shared on Instagram what people can do if ICE comes knocking on their door.

View this post on Instagram

What to do if ICE agents are at your door. #KnowYourRights

A post shared by ACLU (@aclu_nationwide) on

They advise not to open the door unless they have a warrant signed by a judge since ICE administrative warrant does not give them permission to enter a home.

The ACLU website also has an entire section dedicated to immigrants’ rights with several resources for dealing with ICE, border patrol, and the police.

In response to raid that occurred in Ohio a little more than a year ago, HOLA Ohio founder Veronica Isabel Dahlberg wrote in a blog on the ACLU site:

“Regardless of citizenship status, for workers — including teenagers, mothers, fathers, and those with medical issues — to be treated like enemy insurgents is beyond disturbing. It is terrible, barbaric, and inhumane.”

READ: Daughter Sues ICE After They Denied Father Cirrhosis And Diabetes Medication While In Detention Resulting In His Death

13 Facts You Didn’t Know About Tajín

Culture

13 Facts You Didn’t Know About Tajín

Tajín is one of those things that you just don’t question. It’s just always existed–in someone’s purse, on the ring of your margarita, in savory and sweet treats alike. There are no rules when it comes to Tajín. It’s just been in the family since forever.

No matter how ubiquitous Tajín is in your pantry, purse, or every family photo on the mantle, we bet you didn’t know these facts about fruit’s favorite seasoning.

Tajín™ has blessed our people for nearly 35 years.

@tajinonthego / Instagram

But of course, like every other Mexican food company, the flavors are built off traditional Mexican flavors that have been around much longer. We all get to toast our Tajín-rimmed michelada’s to an abuela.

We owe *this* to an abuelita named Mama Necha.

@eloteslapurisima / Instagram

The story goes that Tajín founder Horacio Fernandez was just a boy when his abuela, Necha, would make her signature sauce. He would shout, “Mama Necha made her sauce!” That would set off alarms for friends and family to gather around the table.

Mama Necha would use seven different chiles to make the sauce.

@at_ghost / Instagram

Horacio specifically loved pouring the sauce over a fresh elote. His website describes the “Aha!” moment as “One day, as he delighted in the way the sauce ran down the sides of his corn cob he thought how wonderful it would be if there were a way for the whole world to taste this sauce.”

From then on, Horacio started developing a special process to dehydrate the limes and chiles.

@Elton_Osorio / Twitter

Horacio’s goal with Tajín wasn’t to recreate the exact sauce his abuela created. He wanted to preserve the quality and flavors of the sauce–in a dehydrated form.

Tajín is technically a “powdered sauce.”

@taerimasu / Twitter

It might say ‘seasoning’ on the bottle but, since it’s 1993 year of launch in the U.S. market, Tajín has been a pioneer in the “powdered sauce” category.

Horacio’s powdered his abuela’s recipe so that way he could bring the flavors everywhere he went.

@tajinusa / Instagram

It’s advertised as a way to spice up fruit and vegetables, but we’re all sneaking it’s miniature size into every movie theater like our mamis taught us. The trope that Latinos are spicy is probably because of tajín.

The name came after Horacio visited the Tajín archeological site in Veracruz.

@renistraveler / Instagram

Horacio was on a trip to delve further into Mexico’s rich history. He was mesmerized by the ruins of Tajín, and once he found out “aji” means chile in the Nahuatl language, it was all over for him. He launched his company and named it Tajín in 1985.

Every purchase of Tajín helps support the National School of Ceramics.

“Responsabilidad Social” Digital Image. Tajín. 21 June 2019.

Horacio wanted to make sure that his company did more to preserve Mexican culture. Tajín undoubtedly has made an impact to spread the culture globally, but what about at home?

The school is working to provide Bachelors, Masters and P.h.D. degrees, but for now it’s offering workshops and classes to preserve a cornerstone of Mexican arts.

The bottle label says “THIS IS NOT CANDY” for a reason.

@indulge_gourmetdesserts / Instagram

Apparently, children have been known to eat it straight from the bottle. The seasoning is made of seven different chiles, and, as good as it tastes going down, we imagine children’s tummies couldn’t quite handle it.

Tajín has become part of countless signature drink recipes.

@tajinonthego / Instagram

Granted, most of us just sprinkle Tajín onto every drink. The best micheladas and bloody marys are spiced up with Tajín.

The only covered strawberries Latinos want are chamoy and Tajín covered strawberries.

@sweettreatsbyjazz / Instagram

How good do these spicy strawberries look? Those are chamoy infusers🍓

Tajín leaves people feeling more body positive than before.

@tajinonthego / Instagram

One Tajín fan likes to use the varying size options as a reminder to stay bo-po. Her caption reads, “Just a friendly Tajín reminder to love yourself . We come in all shapes , colors, & sizes. ❤️🧡💛💚💙💜”

Tajín is completely allergen-free and Kosher.

@ashleyfozfit / Instagram

It’s safe for everyone, y’all! Spread the word–Tajín might not have been around B.C. but it’s going to be around for a long, long time.

Paid Promoted Stories