Things That Matter

A Guatemalan Child Migrant Had His Throat Slit And Was Found Next To His Dead Father In Mexico

The migrant crisis has a death toll. Whether it is migrants dying trying to traverse some of the most hostile parts of North America, violent gangs, police brutality, medical negligence in Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) and Customs and Border Protection (CBP) detention, or homicidal coyotes, the death toll is rising. Immigration policies in Mexico and the U.S. are partly to blame for the deaths and the desperation to live a life free of fear and violence is what forces families to be put in harm’s way. That is the story of Cristian, a Guatemalan boy left to die with his father’s body.

A 10-year-old Guatemalan boy is recovering after being left for dead in the desert with his father’s body.

Credit: @RafaelRomoCNN / Twitter

CNN reports that a 10-year-old migrant boy was left for dead with his throat slit next to his father’s body. The boy was found in the Mexican state of Morelos. The father and son were making their way from Guatemala to the U.S. with the help of a coyote.

Despite having hired the smuggler to get them from Guatemala to the U.S., they were abandoned in Mexico.

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The father and son were abandoned by the coyote and that’s when they were kidnapped, according to CNN. That is when the pair were kidnapped by members of the Los Zetas drug cartel and held for ransom. The cartel members contacted Cristian and his father Rudy’s family in the U.S. demanding $12,000. CNN reports that they could only get $8,000 and that’s when the cartel ceased communication.

Cristian and Rudy were on the journey with Rudy’s brother and his son.

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Rudy’s brother and his son managed to escape the gang members and CNN reports that they are now in the care of Mexican authorities. Cristian was found on July 6 with his throat slit lying next to the body of his dead father. Cristian’s survival is a miracle.

Migrants are regularly the victims of crime when passing through Mexico to the U.S. border. The crimes committed in Mexico against migrants range from robbery to murder.

The latest tragedy in the migrant crisis has Christians calling out Evangelicals for their harmful and dangerous approval of Trump’s immigration policies.

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The “Remain In Mexico” policies and the increased restrictions on asylum claims is leading to an increase in deaths for the migrant crisis. Men, women, and children are dying trying to get the U.S. and some have started dying once in immigration authority custody.

The deaths of migrants desperate to reach the U.S. border have garnered more attention in recent months.

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The tragic deaths of Óscar Martínez Ramírez and his very young daughter shocked the U.S. but haven’t spurred any change. The father and daughter were desperate to reach the U.S. border to apply for asylum from El Salvador. The father and daughter tried swimming across the Rio Grande after being denied a chance to request asylum at a port of entry.

The migrant crisis has become so prevalent in the U.S consciousness that presidential candidates are being asked how they will save lives if elected.

“Watching those images of Óscar and Valeria is heartbreaking. It should also piss us all off,” Democratic presidential candidate Julián Castro said during the Democratic Debates. “If I were president today, I would sign an executive order that would get rid of Trump’s ‘zero tolerance’ policy, the ‘Remain In Mexico’ policy, and the metering policy. This metering policy is basically what prompted Óscar and Valeria to make that risky swim across the river.”

Castro added: “They had been playing games with people coming and seeking asylum at our ports of entry. Óscar and Valeria went to a port of entry and then they were denied the ability to make an asylum claim. So, they got frustrated and they tried to cross the river and they died because of that.”

The policy of metering at the border is not new but Trump has ramped it up making it more and more dangerous for asylum seekers.

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According to NPR, “metering is the term that Customs and Border Protection uses for a process by which it limits the number of people who can request asylum at a port of entry at a U.S.-Mexico border crossing each day.”

NPR reporter James Frederick explains, “As far as U.S. asylum law says, anyone who steps foot in the U.S. has the ability to request asylum. So what CBP is doing is they’re stationing a guard at border crossings. Asylum-seekers that show up there, they tell them they have to turn around and go put their name on a waitlist, basically, back in Mexico and wait for their turn to request asylum. And these lists are getting very long. People are waiting weeks or sometimes months for their opportunity to request asylum. The latest figure we have is that 19,000 asylum-seekers are waiting on the Mexican side of the border for their chance to request asylum in the U.S.”

It is important that Americans stay engaged in the discussion about immigration and asylum seekers.

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The Trump administration is further restricting asylum claims and only making it harder and more dangerous for people to seek legal asylum in the U.S. Call your representatives and senators and let them know what you think about the change to asylum laws attacking migrants.

READ: Yesterday’s Attack On An ICE Detention Center Could Have Resulted In The Mass Murder Of Migrants

Former Republican Presidential Candidate Herman Cain Dies Of Covid After Refusing To Wear Masks

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Former Republican Presidential Candidate Herman Cain Dies Of Covid After Refusing To Wear Masks

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The U.S. has recorded more than 150,000 deaths from Covid-19. Former Republican Presidential candidate Herman Cain is one of them. After fighting for weeks against the virus, Cain died in the hospital.

Herman Cain, a former Republican presidential candidate, died after his battle with Covid-19.

Cain was diagnosed with Covid-19 and was hospitalized about two weeks after attending the infamous Trump rally in Tulsa, Oklahoma. He was photographed at the event without a mask and surrounded by people who were not wearing masks.

“You’re never ready for the kind of news we are grappling with this morning. But we have no choice but to seek and find God’s strength and comfort to deal with it,” reads the Herman Cain website. “Herman Cain – our boss, our friend, like a father to so many of us – has passed away. He’s entering the presence of the Savior he’s served as an associate minister at Antioch Baptist Church in Atlanta, and preparing for his reward.”

There has been a lot of attention drawn to Cain’s refusal to wear a mask during the pandemic.

It isn’t clear how much of an impact Trump’s Tulsa rally had on Cain’s diagnosis. The Tulsa County Republican Party asked for people who went to the rally to come forward if they have Covid or interacted with Cain. The goal is to make sure that, if there was spread, it can be controlled.

“I didn’t talk to anyone that actually spent time with him,” Jack told The Washington Post. “We have not received any reports of anyone contracting COVID at the rally. I’m not saying there’s not somebody out there. I’m just saying we haven’t received any reports from anybody directly linked to the rally. I thought somebody would have caught it.”

Some people were quick to point out Cain’s opposition to face masks.

The face mask has become a politicized pain point in the U.S. Daily deaths of Covid are increasing and the face mask prevents the spread. The Republican Party has recently seen infections within their rank. A death to Covid is tragic and senseless because of the lack of national response.

“Herman was 74. Although he was basically pretty healthy in recent years, he was still in a high-risk group because of his history with cancer,” reads the announcement on his website. We all prayed so hard every day. We knew the time would come when the Lord would call him home, but we really liked having him here with us, and we held out hope he’d have a full recovery.

Twitter users are pointing to Cain as a cautionary tale about the impact of Covid-19.

Cain was a proud Trump supporter and followed in the anti-mask campaign. The virus is picking up steam in the U.S. right now and it is more important now than ever to protect against the virus.

Rest in peace, Herman Cain.

READ: Boston Red Sox Pitcher Eduardo Rodriguez Suffering From Covid-Related Heart Inflammation

The Coronavirus Is Starting To Hit Mexico’s Poorest Communities And The Results Could Be Devastating

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The Coronavirus Is Starting To Hit Mexico’s Poorest Communities And The Results Could Be Devastating

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Mexico has been ravaged by the Coronavirus pandemic. That’s a fact. It now ranks fourth globally in terms of deaths related to the virus, with nearly 50,000 dead. However, many of those cases and deaths have largely been centered on the country’s large cities – including Ciudad de México, Guadalajara and Tijuana.

That appears to be changing as many of Mexico’s most remote and poorest pueblos – most inhabited by Indigenous communities – have started to see the virus appear on their doorsteps. With many rural pueblitos lacking access to healthcare and many having extreme rates of poverty, this could spell disaster for Mexico’s most vulnerable communities.

Mexico’s poorest village has its first case of Coronavirus and this could be devastating for locals.

Mexico’s rural pueblitos, largely home to Indigenous communities, had mostly escaped the worst of the Coronavirus pandemic. For months, as the virus raged across the country, Mexico’s Indigenous communities enacted their own checkpoints and lockdowns and roadblocks that helped contain the virus’ spread. However, that strategy seems to have reached a dead end as new reports of Covid-19 emerge from Mexico’s poorest and most rural communities.

In Oaxaca, the village of Santos Reyes Yucuná – which is Mexico’s poorest, reported its first case of the virus on July 17, four months after the pandemic reached Mexico. The virus took longer to find its way to this remote, Mixtec community located 140 miles from the state’s capital due to its lack of infrastructure, especially roads.

Santos Reyes Yucuná is especially vulnerable to virus. The government’s social development agency (CONEVAL) estimates that 99.9% of the 1,380 residents live in extreme poverty. The region has no hospital and most residents do not have health insurance or the means to travel to a hospital in another area. Another town in Oaxaca’s Mixteca region, Coicoyán de las Flores, is in a similar situation with similar levels of poverty. One case of the Coronavirus was reported last month and the patient, a 25-year-old woman, died. 

Last weekend, 23 new cases of Covid-19 were registered in the Mixteca region, for a total of 482 positive cases and at least 48 reported deaths. The area’s municipal seat, Huajuapan, has the highest number of cases at 30, with three people hospitalized. 

Many rural communities had been labeled ‘Communities of Hope’ and were allowed to reopen early to avoid severe economic costs.

As the Coronavirus first arrived to Mexico, many leaders of rural pueblitos were quick to enact strict preventive measures, closing food markets and installing health checkpoints and roadblocks. But as the economic effects began to be felt, the government launched a program known as the “Municipalities of Hope.”

The program included 324 towns that the government decided were eligible to reopen early. The plan allowed places with no Covid-19 cases – and with no cases in surrounding areas – to start lifting restrictions, in an attempt to mitigate the shutdown’s devastating economic impact.

But just a couple of months later, that list has dwindled to just a few dozen villages. One town – Ometepec, Guerrero, lasted less than 14 days on the list. “In just a few weeks, we went from zero to 47 confirmed cases and six dead,” said Ulises Moreno Tabarez, a postdoctoral researcher who lives in the town.

According to Dr Carlos Magis Rodríguez, a professor of medicine and a public health researcher at the National Autonomous University of Mexico, a lack of serious lockdown measures doomed the strategy from the beginning. “If there were strict control of entrances and exits, a quarantine upon arrival, it could have worked,” Magis Rodríguez told Reforma. “The places this has worked are practically islands.”

But less than two months later, Mexico has become one of the worst-affected countries in the world.

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As of July 29, Mexico has more than 400,000 confirmed Covid-19 cases and 44,876 people have died from the virus. Mexico now ranks 6th globally in number of cases and 4th in number of deaths. And these numbers are widely seen as under reporting the severity of the crisis. Mexico has one of the lowest testing rates in the world, at approximately 2.5 tests per confirmed case, compared with the U.S. rate of 12.52, the UK’s 22.57 – and New Zealand’s rate of 359.2.

Meanwhile, Mexico’s weak healthcare system is underfunded; hospitals attribute a large number of coronavirus deaths to faulty equipment and a lack of resources rather than the virus itself. The country is in no way equipped to provide unemployment benefits or stimulus checks to almost half of the population that lives in poverty. Furthermore, many informal workers lack health insurance. The country has very little in the way of a safety net, so many are forced to decide risking their health or risk going hungry.

Mexicans are not alone as countries across Latin America have failed to support their citizens.

Credit: Hector Vivas / Getty Images

Across Latin America, poor families have faced an impossible choice – between obeying quarantine measures and starving, or venturing out to work despite the danger of infection.

But unlike other leaders, Mexico’s President Andrés Manuel López Obrador (AMLO) has not introduced stimulus measures to help the most vulnerable communities, instead his government has pushed through a string of severe austerity measures – even as he emphasized the need for the economy to stay open.

The president has also downplayed the pandemic – claiming in April that Mexico had “tamed” the virus – and repeatedly emphasized the need for the economy to stay open, striking a notably more relaxed tone than warnings from the country’s Covid-19 tsar, Hugo López-Gatell.