Things That Matter

A Gay Canadian Couple Upped The Racist Halloween Costume Game And Twitter Has Some Opinions

It’s Halloween so we know to expect some racist and offensive Halloween costumes. It is a yearly tradition at this point. Not only do we expect these costumes, but there is also the inevitable response defending the costumes and calling everyone else sensitive. That’s what happened when one gay Canadian couple posted what might be the most offensive couples costume of the year considering the inhumane condition on the southern border and increasing number of dead migrant children. Here’s a quick recap of Manuel Navarro’s (manverywell) and Marty Fortier’s (marty.fortier) tasteless costume making fun of the immigration crisis currently claiming lives in the U.S.

Marty Fortier and Manuel Navarro thought their ICE/Migrant couples costume was just a normal costume.

Credit: marty.fortier / Instagram

The white-Mexican couple, based in Toronto, seemed to consider it funny to create sexy costumes depicting a humanitarian crisis that has claimed several lives in recent years. According to NBC, 24 people have died while in ICE custody. That does not include other deaths in other federal agencies, including 5 children.

Here’s what the couple looks like out of their sexy ICE Agent/Desperate Migrant costumes.

Credit: marty.fortier / Instagram

Migrants coming to the U.S. border have faced increased scrutiny and mistreatment by federal immigration authorities. At one point, the Trump administration implemented a “zero-tolerance” policy that separated thousands of families. Some of the families will never be reunited as some children went unaccounted for into the foster care and adoption systems.

Some Twitter users immediately began to drag the couple over their tone-deaf costume.

Credit: @MikeMakesTwits / Twitter

The U.S. immigration system has been failing migrants and asylum seekers since President Trump took office. The Trump administration has intentionally misled and permanently traumatized families and children with their operations. If federal immigration authorities weren’t separating families, they were forcing asylum seekers back into Mexico as they wait for their immigration cases. However, many were not informed of their court dates so they missed their court dates making them ineligible for asylum in a cruel tactic utilized by the Trump administration.

Even when faced with a couples costume that is highly offensive, some gay people of color have added their own humorous commentary.

Credit: @MajorPhilebrity / Twitter

The U.S. Supreme Court is hearing a case where a Border Patrol officer opened fire on a teenager at the border. The case is unique in that the teenager was on the Mexican side of the border when the agent fired his weapon and killed the teenager.

Some Twitter users, who followed the couple on Instagram, shared an alleged non-apology by Navarro.

Credit: manverywell / Instagram

According to the screengrab, Navarro explains that he and his boyfriend are not racist. In fact, his Mexican heritage is why he wanted to create the costume in the first place.

Twitter user, @MikeMakesTwits, had a lot of issues with Navarro’s IG story statement and defensive posturing.

Credit: @MikeyMakesTwits / Twitter

It’s one thing to apologize for a costume idea like that. It’s another to tell everyone that they are being overly sensitive when your costume represents the inhumane treatment of thousands of men, women, and children. Navarro clearly doesn’t think his costume is anything to be upset about.

Some people think that Navarro is in the sunken place.

Credit: robinrcloud / Twitter

The sunken place, for those who don’t know the movie “Get Out,” is where the black people in the town go after being hypnotized. The sunken place is where they are forced so that they can be subservient to the white people.

And one Twitter user is just not buying that this kind of behavior goes both ways.

Credit: @thatdivad / Twitter

What do you think about the costume? Do you think the couple went too far? Or do you think people are being too sensitive? Let us know.

READ: Here’s Your Yearly Reminder That Blackface For Your Halloween Costume Ain’t It, Y’all

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“Sister, Sister” Actress Tia Mowry Broke Down In Tears Describing A Racist Incident She Experienced As A Teen

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“Sister, Sister” Actress Tia Mowry Broke Down In Tears Describing A Racist Incident She Experienced As A Teen

CBS Television Distribution

Back in the 90s, Tia and Tamera Mowry were experiencing the height of their fame while on the hit show “Sister, Sister.” The series which followed Tia and Tamera as Tia Landry and Tamera Campbell saw two actors play the part of two identical twins separated at birth and then accidentally reunited in their teens. It won several Emmys and Kids’ Choice Awards and cemented itself as essential Black TV. As a result, the twin sisters scored roles on other series, movies, and all kinds of media attention. And not for a lack of racist incidents that attempted to hold them back

Recently, Tia opened up about her experience as a Black teen actor in the 90s and shared a story that clearly still hurts her heart.

Speaking to Entertainment Tonight, Tia shared that she and her sister were once rejected from appearing in a teen magazine cover because of their skin color.

Speaking about the incident, Tia recalled how she’d been subjected to racism when she was a teen on the show and attempting to be on the cover of a popular magazine at the time.

“It was around Sister, Sister days. The show was extremely popular. We were beating — like in the ratings — Friends around that time,” Tia said. “So, my sister and I wanted to be on the cover of this very popular magazine at the time — it was a teenage magazine. We were told that we couldn’t be on the cover of the magazine because we were Black and we would not sell.”

The actress teared up as she went onto recall that “Here I am as an adult and, wow, it still affects me, how someone could demean your value because of the color of your skin,” she said. “I will never forget that. I wish I would have spoken up. I wish I would have said something then. I wish I would have had the courage to speak out and say that isn’t right.”

Years later Tia says she has used that moment to drive her in raising her two children.

Tia (who is a mother to Cree, 9, and Cairo, 2) says that “to this day, I’m always telling my beautiful brown-skinned girl that she is beautiful.”

“What I’ve done with my children is [reading] books,” she explained to People. “You can read incredible books to your children about Rosa Parks, about Martin Luther King Jr. — pivotal people that had a huge impact within the movement.”

“The other thing is through television, especially during this time,” she went onto explain. “I was just having my children watch a whole bunch of [things] that starred a lot of African American actors, and one of them is [TheWiz. You had Michael Jackson, Diana Ross. It was just such a great story. And my son … he loved it, [and] it’s important.”

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A Federal Court Just Ended Temporary Protected Status For More Than 300,000 Immigrants, Here’s What You Need To Know

Things That Matter

A Federal Court Just Ended Temporary Protected Status For More Than 300,000 Immigrants, Here’s What You Need To Know

Chip Somodevilla / Getty Images

A federal court just handed a huge ‘victory’ to the Trump administration, which has been eager to restart mass deportations. Despite a global health pandemic, the administration has been pressing forward with plans to deport hundreds of thousands of undocumented immigrants.

Until now, many of these migrants were safe from deportation thanks to Temporary Protected Status, which shields some immigrants from deportation under humanitarian claims. However, the recent court decision – in San Francisco’s 9th Circuit – gives Trump exactly what he wants right before the elections.

But how will it affect immigrant communities across the country? Here’s everything you need to know about this major decision.

The 9th Circuit Court just ended TPS for more than 300,000 undocumented immigrants.

A California appeals court on Monday gave the Trump Administration permission to end Temporary Protected Status for immigrants from El Salvador, Nicaragua, Haiti, and Sudan, clearing the way for officials to force more than 300,000 immigrants out of the country.

The decision affects people from all walks of life, many of whom have lived in the U.S. for decades, have U.S.-born children and have been considered essential workers during the coronavirus pandemic.

This week’s ruling from the circuit court comes after a district court (also in California) temporarily halted Trump’s plan to end TPS in late 2018 after a group of lawyers sued, arguing that Trump was motivated by racial discrimination.

“The president’s vile statements about TPS holders made perfectly clear that his administration acted out of racial animus,”Ahilan Arulanantham, a lawyer for the ACLU of Southern California, wrote in a statement. “The Constitution does not permit policy to be driven by racism. We will seek further review of the court’s decision.”

But today’s 2-1 decision reversed the district court’s temporary order and allowed the federal government to take away TPS protections while the court case continues.

ICE and DHS has promised to wait several months before taking away TPS status if the agency won in court. As a result, the ACLU told NPR that it expects the protections to start ending no sooner than March, meaning that Joe Biden could reverse the administration’s decision if he wins in November, though the organization plans to fight back in the meantime.

Temporary Protected Status was created to protect people in the U.S. from being sent back to dangerous places – and it’s saved lives.

Credit: Daniel Ortega / Getty Images

The TPS program was first introduced in 1990, and it has protected immigrants from more than 20 countries at various points since then. More than 300,000 people from 10 different nations currently use the program, some of whom have lived and worked in the United States for decades.

Trump has sharply criticized the program, sometimes along racial lines, and in one infamous and widely criticized incident two years ago, the president reportedly referred to the program’s beneficiaries as “people from shithole countries.”

TPS provides protection for short periods of up to 18 months, but the federal government has continuously extended it for the countries mentioned in the lawsuit “based on repeated findings that it remains unsafe to return.” 

As a result, it said, most TPS holders have been living in the U.S. for more than a decade, contributing to their communities and raising their families. Many of the more than 200,000 U.S.-citizen children of TPS holders have never been to the country their parents are from and would have to choose between their families and their homes.

The ruling will have a major impact on migrant families and communities across the U.S.

Credit: Chip Somodevilla / Getty Images

Immigration advocacy groups are slamming the court’s ruling, noting it will impact hundreds of thousands of TPS holders as well as their families and communities. In a statement, Beth Werlin, executive director of the American Immigration Council, said the decision will “plunge their lives into further turmoil at a time when we all need greater certainty.” 

As the global pandemic stretches on, immigrants with protected status make up a large portion of the country’s front-line workers. More than 130,000 TPS recipients are essential workers, according to the Center for American Progress. 

“TPS recipients have deep economic and social roots in communities across the nation,” said Ali Noorani, president and CEO of the National Immigration Forum. “And, as the U.S. responds to the COVID-19 pandemic, TPS recipients are standing shoulder to shoulder with Americans and doing essential work.”

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