Things That Matter

Facebook Wants To Add Latinas In Tech To Their Teams And Offer Them A Slice Of Their Big Salary Earning Pie

While creating an idyllic work atmosphere can seem nearly impossible, there’s no doubting that a diverse work environment can help push companies closer to achieving this. Time and time again, research has proven that diversity in the workplace is essential. Not only can having people from different backgrounds and walks of life drive creativity and productivity it can also foster education and empathy. One of the most influential companies in the world right now has recently, fortunately, decided to take a step back, survey its employee landscape and add diversity to it.

In the latest big move from social media giant, Facebook has announced its plans to diversify its existing workforce within the next five years.

On July 10th, the social media giant released its latest job numbers and explained where it hopes to see itself in the near future.

Twitter / @FBnewsroom

In its sixth-annual diversity report, Facebook disclosed that it has had little success hiring from what it refers to as “traditionally underrepresented groups.” Since 2014, the social media company has worked globally to hire more employees who are Black, Latino, Indigenous and Pacific Islanders as well as disabled employees and veterans. It has also focused on hiring more women around the world.

This year, Facebook claims that its workforce breaks down to  63.1% male and 36.9% female. Also, 44.2% of its employees are white. The remaining employee population amounts to 43% Asian, 5.2% Latinx and 3.8% Black. An added 3.1% of its employees report being from two or more backgrounds while 0.7% were marked down as “other” — mostly consisting of Indigenous people and Pacific Islanders.

However, it seems the company has its work cut out for themselves because they have only shown minor improvements in these categories in the past year.

Twitter / @flashrecruiter

“We’ve made some progress increasing the number of people from traditionally underrepresented groups employed at Facebook but we recognize that we need to do more,” Facebook admitted in its report.

This year’s stats find only a .6% increase in women employees over last year’s percentage. Senior leadership has also changed from 70% male to 67.4%. Additionally, its efforts to improve its racial diversity has also proved to be a slow process. Over year, it increased 1.6% in Asian employees, .3% in Latinx employees and .3% in Black employees. Facebook only increased their representation in their “other” and “two or more” categories by .1% each.

Though the numbers appear disheartening, Facebook is confident to expand upon what little progress they’ve achieved.

Twitter / @DigiCrimRMIT

In a Facebook blog post, the company states:

“Since 2014, we have increased the number of Black women at Facebook by 25X and the number of Black men by 10X. And importantly, even as we have grown, we have worked very hard on making Facebook a more welcoming, respectful workplace.”

While these numbers sound impressive, considering the small percentages their diversity breaks down to, it is still nowhere close to where a huge company like Facebook should be. Still, they have big goals for increasing these numbers — both globally and nationally — over the next five years.

Their blog post goes on to say:

“We envision a company wherein the next five years, at least 50% of our workforce will be women, people who are Black, Hispanic, Native American, Pacific Islanders, people with two or more ethnicities, people with disabilities, and veterans. In doing this, we aim to double our number of women globally and Black and Hispanic employees in the US. It will be a company that reflects and better serves the people on our platforms, services, and products. It will be a more welcoming community advancing our mission and living up to the responsibility that comes with it.”

Though this is an ambitious push for more company diversity, some critics point out that Facebook has, so far, failed Black and Latinx women.

Twitter / @jguynn

As a technology journalist for USA Today, Jessica Guynn covered this failure last year when Facebook released its fifth-yearly diversity report.

In her piece, she reported:

“The sharpest deficits in Silicon Valley are African-American and Hispanic women, who make up 1 percent or fewer of workers, while across other industries they are represented at much higher rates consistent with their proportion of the overall U.S. population.”

Guynn goes on to point out the lack of intersectionality in diversity hiring:

“Allison Scott, chief of research at the Kapor Center, says the diversity conversation in Silicon Valley mostly focuses on race and ethnicity or gender, not both. And efforts made by tech companies to close the gender gap have boosted the fortunes of white women while hobbling progress for women of color.”

Failure to recognize that marginalized people can also have privilege has benefited white women in diversity hiring. Also, not seeing that a marginalized person can occupy more than one category has failed Black women and women of color as well as female veterans and disabled women.

Twitter / @marcboxser

Though their slow growth can be discouraging, it’s a start. More companies need to embrace a more diversified workforce that reflects the true dynamics of our society. Until that is achieved, these organizations will miss out on amazing employees simply because of outdated hiring processes.

A Researcher Created A Map To Track All Of The Women That Are Murdered In Mexico And It Is Shocking

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A Researcher Created A Map To Track All Of The Women That Are Murdered In Mexico And It Is Shocking

The violence against women in Mexico continues to rise to alarming rates. They are dying at the hands of domestic assailants as well as organized crime culprits. In 2018, 3,580 women and girls were killed in Mexico, the Associated Press reports. 

President Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador is aiming to curtail this epidemic under his new administration by conducting thorough murder investigations, having a stronger judicial system to prosecute offenders and, among other initiatives, to search for women who are missing as soon as it’s reported.

“All of them have a common factor: the lack of timely and diligent intervention by the Mexican state to preserve their integrity and to ensure their lives,” Interior Secretary Olga Sanchez Cordero said, according to the AP.

Until the new government gets their act together, one woman is making sure the death of every woman in Mexico doesn’t go unnoticed. 

María Salguero, a geophysics scholar, and researcher, has created a mapping system to keep track of each woman that is murdered in Mexico. 

According to news reports, Salguero said that worldwide attention (or at least in the U.S. and in Mexico) surrounded the deaths of women that occurred only in Ciudad de Juarez. She said she wanted to not only track the deaths of women all over Mexico but also to have their names in a recorded document because it’s crucial to name them. 

She began tracking the femicide in her country in 2016 and initially began by getting Google alerts of violence against women. 

Since she first started the project, Salguero has obtained the records of “more than 6,000 cases of femicide dating back to 2011. In 27 cases, authorities were unable to establish the woman’s identity. In 70 cases, the victim was a trans woman,” Open Democracy states. 

Her tracking system is detailed and includes the victim’s name, where their body was found, and of course the city and state. 

This work is a labor of love for Salguero who works full-time at the National Search Commission of Mexico. She said she works on the mapping system on her off time and it takes up to five hours a day, depending on the workload. 

According to Salguero’s tracking system, the overwhelming majority of femicide is occurring in the state of Mexico.

Her report, which is also verified by state records, show that in 2018 400 women died in Mexico state, followed by Guanajuato, Baja California, Guerrero, and Jalisco. The state with the least murders is Yucatan. 

She also notes that the numbers provided by country officials may not be accurate and could be a lot higher than they are reporting. 

“Only a part of the problem is documented by the press and not all. There is a 15 percent national bias in the official data. There are women who arrive injured in health systems and die because of the seriousness of the injuries and are not reported by the press, women who are murdered or in their homes or communities far away and there was not a means to cover them,” she said. “The bodies which are found but the sex is undetermined, are cases that can not be documented.”

Women in Mexico don’t just live in fear of death, but they also endure day-to-day harassment.

According to a United Nations report, a survey showed that almost 90 percent of women experience sexual harassment and other forms of sexual violence in public spaces in Mexico City alone. These public places include subways, buses, and streets. 

Yeliz Osman, Safe Cities, and Safe Public Spaces Programme Coordinator at UN Women in Mexico said that the same harassment that women face in Mexico is the same in other parts of the world. “The overwhelming majority of women who participated in focus groups said that they experience some form of sexual harassment in their daily journeys. She adds, “These behaviors have been so normalized and naturalized within societies that women themselves don’t often consider it important enough to report and men don’t even realize in many cases that this is actually a form of violence and the impact that it has on women and girls.”

Click here to visit Salguero’s tracking system of femicides in Mexico.

A Secret Facebook Group For Immigration Officers Mocking Dead Migrants Has Been Exposed

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A Secret Facebook Group For Immigration Officers Mocking Dead Migrants Has Been Exposed

customsborder / Instagram

It’s been revealed that members of a secret Facebook group for Border Patrol agents have been sharing jokes about migrant deaths, sexist memes about lawmakers and making racist comments. According to an investigation published by ProPublica, the secret Facebook page, for former and current Border Patrol officers, was called “I’m 10-15,” which refers to the Border Patrol’s code 10-15, for “aliens in custody.”

The page became a place for members to make racist, sexist, and inhumane comments about migrants, and government officials. Now, U.S. Border Patrol is facing backlash for the uncovered Facebook group.

Here’s what we know about the Facebook group.

Created in August 2016, the group described itself as a forum for “funny” and “serious” discussion about work with border patrol. “Remember you are never alone in this family,” the introduction said. There were roughly 9,500 members in the group, which according to Propublica, is nearly half the current number of Border Patrol officers.

The investigation also revealed that many of the people in the conversations on the group were “apparently legitimate Facebook profiles belonging to Border Patrol agents.” At this time it’s unclear if ProPublica was able to verify how many of the members are actually current or former border patrol agents.

Images show comments mocking drowned migrants Óscar Alberto Martínez Ramírez and his 23-month-old daughter, Valeria.

Credit: ProPublica

In a disturbing post, group members joked about the Salvadoran father and his 23-month-old daughter who drowned in the Rio Grande while trying to cross into the U.S. The image, which shows their bodies floating in the water, was the center of uproar against the Trump administrations asylum laws after being published by news organizations last week.

“I’m not trying to an a$$ but I HAVE NEVER SEEN FLOATERS LIKE THIS,” one member of the Facebook group wrote, suggesting the photo could have been edited. “We’ve all seen the dems and liberal parties do some pretty sick things…”

Another post shows a group member making fun of the death of Carlos Gregorio Hernandez-Vasquez, a 16-year-old Guatemalan migrant who died in custody at a Border Patrol station in Weslasco, Texas. A member responded to the news of his passing with a GIF of Elmo shrugging. “If he dies, he dies,” commented another.

Members of the group shared derogatory and sexist comments about lawmakers, including Reps. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, D-N.Y., and Veronica Escobar, D-Texas.

Credit: ProPublica

Lawmakers were a big target of the Facebook group. Users called Rep. Ocasio-Cortez and Rep. Veronica Escobar both “hoes” and “scum buckets,” this included a comment that agents should throw a “burrito at these bitches.” Both lawmakers had planned visits to a Border Patrol facility outside El Paso on Monday but didn’t know of the group until after.

Ocasio-Cortez has been on of the most vocal and high-profile voices against the separation of families at the U.S-Border. She’s also spoken out about conditions at holding facilities and has compared migrant detention centers to concentration camps. Shortly after the story broke, Ocasio-Cortez tweeted the story with the comment, “This isn’t about ‘a few bad eggs.’ This is a violent culture.”

“9,500 CBP officers sharing memes about dead migrants and discussing violence and sexual misconduct towards members of Congress,” Ocasio-Cortez wrote. “How on earth can CBP’s culture be trusted to care for refugees humanely?”

There has been immediate backlash since the story broke.

Credit:@funder / Twitter

There has been swift and immediate condemning of the Facebook group from advocacy groups and fellow lawmakers. The Congressional Hispanic Caucus said the comments are unacceptable and demanded the offending officers be let go.

“Unfortunately, there are many within [Customs and Border Patrol] who have become desensitized to the point of being dangerous to the migrants in their care,” Rep. Joaquin Castro (D-Texas) said at a press conference in Clint, Texas. “I expect there will be a congressional investigation to get to the bottom of it.”

Many are calling the Facebook group a product of the culture within the border enforcement community. Customs and Border Protection is now undergoing an investigation into the group.

“These posts are completely inappropriate and contrary to the honor and integrity I see — and expect — from our agents day in and day out,” Carla Provost, Border Patrol chief, told NBC News. “Any employees found to have violated our standards of conduct will be held accountable.”

Daniel Martinez, a sociologist at the University of Arizona in Tucson who studies the border, told ProPublica that the Facebook group reflects what “seems to be a pervasive culture of cruelty aimed at immigrants.”

“These comments and memes are extremely troubling,” Martinez said. “They’re clearly xenophobic and sexist.”

READ: This Is The Emotional Cartoon That Got An Artist Fired From His Job For Criticizing Trump’s Immigration Policies

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