Things That Matter

Estolia’s Salsa Is Helping Charities One Jar Of Salsa At A Time

Estolia’s Food Products is on a mission to help Los Angeles charities one jar of salsa at a time. The company, which is beginning to making a name for itself with its salsa, donates part of its profits to different charitable organizations. The inspiration for the salsa? Well, a recipe passed down to the owner from her abuela.

Estolia’s salsa packs more than just a punch; they also pack some social good.

What a way to make a difference in someone's life. Help us on our mission to give a voice to those who can't speak and the strength they need for HOPE.

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The company creates four kinds of salsa and 100 percent of the proceeds are donated to causes specific to the salsa.

Classic Salsa = Leukemia research; Pineapple Salsa = homelessness and hunger; Salsa Asado = animal rescues; and Salsa Verde = Alzheimer’s research.

“When we began this journey a few years ago, we had no idea that it would blossom into a line of salsas dedicated to saving lives,” reads the Estolia’s website. “We were inspired when we began attending and exhibiting at the Los Angeles non-profit event ‘Race for the Rescues’. It was then that ‘Salsa Saves Lives’ was born. Choosing the causes for ‘Salsa Saves Lives’ was easy because each one touched our lives in a powerful way.”

And none of it would be possible if it wasn’t for the owners’ very own abuela, who brought her salsa recipe with her to the U.S. when she fled the Mexican Revolution.


“During The Mexican revolution in 1917 my grandmother, Estolia Santana, accompanied by her mother and six siblings, left their native homeland Tepospizaloya, Jalisco for El Paso, Texas,” reads the Estolia’s website. “After five long years of hardship in Texas, the family set out for Los Angeles, California in search of opportunity and the American dream. Out of desperation, Estolia took a job as a cook where she created a revolution of her own and developed her legendary cooking skills while providing for her five children she raised on her own.”

Now, salsa isn’t the only thing sold by Estolia’s Food Products online.

WOW! We sold out our first time on HSN. #awesome #mexicanfood

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While the salsa is doing some serious good, Estolia’s sells prepared meals that you can find on the Home Shopping Network and Williams Sonoma.

Or, if you are lucky, you might catch them selling tamales as special events.

Day 2 of the tamale Festival and were killing it!

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Their salsa, however, is one way to literally put your money where your mouth is.

Thank you Good Day L.A. For representing our mission to help our community. #salsasaveslives

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Buen hecho!

Check out more about Estolia’s Salsa below.

‘Salsa Saves Lives’ thanks to abuela’s recipeUsing her abuela’s recipes, this chef is donating 100% of profits to Alzheimers, leukemia, animal rescue and feeding the hungry… depending on which flavor you get.

Posted by Circa on Saturday, March 25, 2017


READ: One Photo On Social Media Changed This Farm Worker’s Life

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This Virgen de Guadalupe Mural Was Vandalized In Los Angeles And The Community Is Devastated

Things That Matter

This Virgen de Guadalupe Mural Was Vandalized In Los Angeles And The Community Is Devastated

La Virgen de Guadalupe means so much to so many. Especially the Latino community in Van Nuys, California, near Los Angeles, which is reeling after an important mural depicting La Virgen was vandalized overnight.

Although security cam footage captured an unknown man defacing the mural, the suspect is still at large and the community is asking for help in finding out who committed the vandalism.

A suspect was caught on camera destroying a mural with La Virgen de Guadalupe.

The community of Saint Elisabeth Church near Los Angeles is asking the community for prayers after a mural of Our Lady of Guadalupe was vandalized on church grounds. 

The parish’s security system recorded video footage of an unknown man dressed in black approaching the mural with a sledgehammer at 1:40 a.m. Wednesday morning. He can be seen smashing the tiles that make up Our Lady’s face several times before fleeing.

On Friday, April 23, Father Di Marzio led a prayer service, which was livestreamed on the parish Facebook page. Some 30 parishioners gathered to sing and pray a decade of the rosary in front of the mural, which is roped off with caution tape, while nearly 100 others joined online. In closing, Fr. Di Marzio encouraged parishioners to “continue to pray to the Blessed Virgin Mary to help us, and to touch the heart of the person who did this.” 

Also on Friday, a local artist, Geo Rhodes, was scheduled to visit the mural and discuss a plan for repair, arranged by the Archdiocese of Los Angeles. “We hope that soon we will restore the image, or have a new one more beautiful than the one we had before,” Fr. Di Marzio said.  

La Virgen de Guadalupe is extremely important to the church.

The hand-painted tile mural stands between the church and the rectory. It was installed over 35 years ago as a “symbol of community unity,” said business manager Irma Ochoa. Each square tile was sponsored by a parish family. Overlooking a small altar, the mural has become a popular place for parishioners to pray and light candles, asking Our Lady for special blessings. 

“I feel an unspeakable sadness,” said Fr. Antonio Fiorenza, who is in residence at the parish. “But I feel pity for the one who made this sacrilegious gesture. I pray for his conversion and for all those who show contempt to the Virgin Mary.”

To donate to the restoration fund, visit stelisabethchurch.org

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Mexicans Travel To U.S. For ‘Vaccine Tourism’ Say It’s A Matter Of Survival

Things That Matter

Mexicans Travel To U.S. For ‘Vaccine Tourism’ Say It’s A Matter Of Survival

The United States is one of the world’s most successful countries when it comes to rolling out the COVID-19 vaccine program. So far, more than 200 million vaccines have been administered across the U.S. and as of this week anyone over the age of 16 is now eligible.

Meanwhile, in many countries around the world – including Mexico – the vaccine roll out is still highly restricted. For many, who can afford to travel, they see the best option at a shot in the arm to take a trip to the U.S. where many locations are reporting a surplus in vaccines.

Wealthy Latin Americans travel to U.S. to get COVID vaccines.

People of means from Latin America are chartering planes, booking commercial flights, buying bus tickets and renting cars to get the vaccine in the United States due to lack of supply back in their home countries. Some of those making the trip include politicians, TV personalities, business executives and a soccer team.

There is an old Mexican joke: God tells a Mexican he has only a week left to live but can ask for one final wish, no matter how outrageous. So the Mexican asks for a ticket to Houston—for a second opinion.

Virginia Gónzalez and her husband flew from Mexico to Texas and then boarded a bus to a vaccination site. They made the trip again for a second dose. The couple from Monterrey, Mexico, acted on the advice of the doctor treating the husband for prostate cancer. In all, they logged 1,400 miles for two round trips.

“It’s a matter of survival,” Gónzalez told NBC News, of getting a COVID-19 vaccine in the United States. “In Mexico, officials didn’t buy enough vaccines. It’s like they don’t care about their citizens.”

Mexico has a vaccine rollout plan but it’s been too slow in many people’s opinions.

With a population of nearly 130 million people, Mexico has secured more vaccines than many Latin American nations — about 18 million doses as of Monday from the U.S., China, Russia and India. Most of those have been given to health care workers, people over 60 and some teachers, who so far are the only ones eligible. Most other Latin American countries, except for Chile, are in the same situation or worse.

So vaccine seekers who can afford to travel are coming to the United States to avoid the long wait, including people from as far as Paraguay. Those who make the trip must obtain a tourist visa and have enough money to pay for required coronavirus tests, plane tickets, hotel rooms, rental cars and other expenses.

There is little that is fair about the global race for the COVID-19 vaccine, despite international attempts to avoid the current disparities. In Israel, a country of 9 million people, half of the population has received at least one dose, while plenty of countries have yet to receive any. While the U.S. could vaccinate 70 percent of its population by September 2021 at the current rollout rate, it could take Mexico until approximately the year 2024 to achieve the same results.

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