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College Is An Incredible Experience If You Do It Right. Here Are 21 Tips To Make The Most Of It

Congrats! You made it to your freshman year of college. Now what? You may be away from home for the first time, free from your mama’s watchful eyes. Some students spend their college years locked away in the library or the door room, barely emerging for meals. Maybe you feel the pressure of being the first person in your family to go to college. Other students spend the entire time on the spectrum of slightly hungover to wasted. Neither one of those is going to be good for you, so here are a few tips to get you on the right path to an enjoyable and productive college career.

1. Go To Class

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Going to class is the number one thing you can do to make sure you pass your classes. This is what you’re paying for, so don’t skip. If you are in class religiously, you’ll get material that is not in the reading and your professors will get to know you better. Both can help if you run into trouble later in the semester.

2. Don’t Overschedule

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Create your first years’ schedule thoughtfully. It may seem like a good idea before you get to college to schedule morning classes. Don’t blame us if you end up regretting it. Especially for your first semester, don’t overload your schedule and think about whether you are really going to want to show up to that 7:30 a.m. advanced chemistry lab.

3. Attend An Activities Fair

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It can be tempting to hide in your room when you first arrive at school, but many colleges have an activity fair that allows campus groups to show you why they’re the greatest. Don’t skip out on these activities. They can help you find your niche, whether you’re into student government, a gamer girl, or want to try out some intramural sports.

4. Find Your Study Spot

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You have to find a spot where you don’t cringe every time it’s time to crack the books. While you can study in your dorm room, be sure to check out other spots like the library, quiet corners of the student union. If you’re like Rory Gilmore you might find a favorite tree outside. Find a spot that is comfortable and where you can concentrate.

5. Have Fun, But Don’t Document Everything

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If you have ever wanted to dye your hair purple and pierce your nose, now is the time to give it a try. Just keep in mind, that if you are going into an uber-professional field like law or medicine, you want to be careful about making changes to your appearance that can’t be covered up. It may suck, but there are still standards of professionalism to be followed, so maybe hold off on face tattoos until you make a solid career path decision. Also, have fun, but don’t do anything illegal that will end up on your permanent record (because that’s a real thing now). Be careful what you put on social media sites. Future employers may be watching.

6. Join An Intramural Sport Or Activity

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Even if sports makes you wince, there are tons of intramural activities you can try. Not into volleyball? There are intramural chess teams at some schools where the only muscle you exercise is your brain. Try to find something that works for you.

7. Don’t Be Afraid Of Getting Tutoring

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Many colleges offer free tutoring, and this is not something you should be afraid to take advantage of. Don’t struggle in a class when you have resources available to help you. Don’t wait until the last week before finals either. If you feel yourself falling behind, check out tutoring programs or talk to your professors for help.

8. Talk To Your Professors

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Get to know your professors, both in and out of class. Ask questions that are deeper than “Will that be on the exam?” Your professors can be some of your biggest advocates, and you want to stand out. Most professors are willing to go the extra mile to help students who show just a little bit of interest. Besides, when else are you going to be surrounded by such academic rockstars?

9. Keep The Papers You Write

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While it may be tempting to have a giant bonfire at the end of the semester and burn it all, hang on to those papers you worked so hard for. Some job applications may require a writing sample, and they can be a great reference for later classes if they are in your major.

10. Make A Plan To Get Your Credits 

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For someone who loves learning, browsing through available classes can make you feel like a kid in a candy store. However, it’s important to have a plan to make sure that you get all your credits so you can graduate on time. Make sure to use your adviser as a resource.

11. Fight Your Introvert Ways

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If you are an introvert, it can be easy to get overwhelmed by all extroverts in class and in college life in general. Make a point to raise your hand and speak out. Talk to people at the gym and in the dining hall. You never know where your next new friend will come from.

12. Ditch The Freshman 15

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Chances are, you have access to the best gym and more free time than you ever will again in your life. Use this as an opportunity to make and reach your fitness goals.

13. Intern Aggressively

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Use your contacts on campus to help you score an internship (aren’t you glad you made friends with your professors?). This is the time to be aggressively pursuing relevant work experience in your chosen field. It’s better to have unpaid internships now than when you graduate and have to begin repaying student loans. Apply, apply, apply.

14. Keep Your Door Open

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When you are home in the dorms, keep your door open. You’ll be more likely to snag an invite or get drawn into some dorm room fun.

15. Take A Weird Class

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Use your elective credits to take a class that is totally different from your major or what you think you want to do. This will broaden your horizon, and you never know – you might find your passion where you least expect it.

16. Get Your Money’s Worth

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Make sure to explore what your campus has to offer you. Does your medical center offer free visits? Does the gym have free fitness classes? Are there mental health resources on campus? Take advantage of all the things those student activity fees paid for.

17. Consider Studying Abroad

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Explore study abroad programs. Even if you can’t afford to travel, there are many programs with scholarships and subsidies available.

18. Become Friends With The University Events Calendar

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College campuses always have something going on, whether it be performances, art exhibits, special speakers, or sporting events. Generally, these are free or greatly reduced for students. Pack in as many activities as you can to expand your horizons. There should never be an excuse to be bored.

19. Cheer On Your Team

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There is just something so electric about dressing up in your university colors and cheering your team to victory. The games usually lead to fun times with every united for one cause. You might even make a new friend or two.

20. Don’t Forget To Call Your Family

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They probably helped get you here. Make sure to call your family at least once a week. Trust us – they miss you and are worrying.

21.  Enjoy the Moment

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These are probably some of the best years of your life.  Explore, learn, and have fun!  Four years will go by really fast – make the most out of it!


READ: From Diapers To Dorms, I Worked Hard To Make Sure My Baby Sister Could Go To College

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Women Are Sharing Why Gut Instincts Made Them Turn Down A Dream Job

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Women Are Sharing Why Gut Instincts Made Them Turn Down A Dream Job

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We’re all familiar with the phrase “trust your gut.” Of course, while the ability to suss out a situation based on instinct might not always lead us down the easiest path, for the most part, many people believe that relying on our gut can help us get through even the hardest life experiences and oftentimes avoid them. In fact, according to research, the belief of trusting in one’s gut is upheld by over half of people living in the United States. But what about when your gut-instinct leads you away from something you might really want?

Recently, a post shared to Instagram about gut instinct caught our attention.

The post served as a reminder to us that its imperative to truly weigh what matters to you when considering a new job or promotion. Still, we couldn’t help but wonder what Latinas think. So we asked and got a whole heck of a lot of advice and answers.

Check them out below!

gverseukYessss! We need to be able to say no to a job with an organisation that we don’t think is right for us. However, this often isn’t an option for many of us, particularly womxn. 😩2d8 likesReply

meeze_82This is goals for me. To get my girls to where they can decline jobs offers becuase they’re smart and strong enough to know they can do better. 👏1d3 likesReply

theresalwayzplanzI took a job that paid more money but i didnt know what the work environment would be like. It was awesome making more money, but it was the first time i felt my mental health be in danger. I left. It was the best thing i did.1d2 likesReply

bellabelicenaAbsolutely! Prioritizing your mental wellness always comes first.♥️2dReply

jojajessI declined a job offer 2 wks ago during an interview. It was so awkward, but I was NOT feeling it. I flat out told her that I needed my job to contribute as much to me as I do to it.

“I ignored my gut for a job with a really significant pay increase in an upper management position. I regretted my decision the first few days I was there, the company culture was horrible, and the work hours were horrendous (11 hour days were seen as “normal”, you weren’t seen as a hard worker / dedicated employee unless you put in 70 hours or more.)” – TrifectaLoser

“I met a gentleman who said he always walks with the boss through the office. If the workers change their demeanor, for example stop smiling and talking and start looking busy, he won’t work there. Your thing looks similar, see how the employees interact and maybe even ask.” reidmrdotcom

“I may be stuck in my ways, but I won’t even go for an interview if I’m going to struggle commuting there, never mind moving to a new city etc just to take the job. But that said, definitely trust your gut.” –johnbarrymore2013

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A Judge Has Ruled That The University of California System Can No Longer Use SAT And ACT Tests For Admissions And It’s A Huge Win For The Underprivileged

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A Judge Has Ruled That The University of California System Can No Longer Use SAT And ACT Tests For Admissions And It’s A Huge Win For The Underprivileged

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Advocates against the use of standardized tests for college admissions have long argued that the use of such exams sets back students from underprivileged backgrounds and those who have disabilities. Aware of the leg up it gives to privileged and non-disabled students an advantage in the admittance process, they’ve rallied for schools to end such practices.

And it looks like they’ve just won their argument.

A judge has ruled that the University of California system can no longer use ACT and SAT tests as part of their admissions process.

Brad Seligman is the Alameda County Superior Court Judge who issued the preliminary injunction in the case of Kawika Smith v. Regents of the University of California on Tuesday. The plaintiffs in Kawika Smith v. Regents of the University of California include five students and six organizations College Access Plan, Little Manila Rising, Dolores Huerta Foundation, College Seekers, Chinese for Affirmative Action, and Community Coalition.

In his decision, Judge Seligman underlined that the UC system’s “test-optional” policy on UC campuses has long given privileged and non-disabled students a chance at a “second look” in the admissions process. According to Seligman, this “second look” denies such opportunities to students who are unable to access the tests.

The decision is a major victory for students with disabilities and from underprivileged backgrounds.

News of the decision comes on the heels of the university system’s ruling to waive the standardized testing requirements until 2024.

In May, a news release asserted that if a new form of a standardized test had not been developed by 2025, the system would have to put an end to the testing requirement for California students. On Monday, the judge’s ruling took things further by banning the consideration of scores from students who submit them all together.

“The current COVID 19 pandemic has resulted in restrictions in the availability of test sites,” Seligman wrote in his ruling. “While test-taking opportunities for all students have been limited, for persons with disabilities, the ability to obtain accommodations or even to locate suitable test locations for the test is ‘almost nil.'”

A spokesperson for the University of California said the university “respectfully disagrees with the Court’s ruling.”

“An injunction may interfere with the University’s efforts to implement an appropriate and comprehensive admissions policies and its ability to attract and enroll students of diverse backgrounds and experiences,” the spokesperson said. According to the spokesperson, the UC system is considering further legal action in the case. The system said that its testing has allowed for an increase in admission of low-income and first-generation-to-college-students for the fall of 2020.

With UC being the largest university system in the country, Seligman’s ruling is a massive deal. Students and advocates have long fought for the elimination of these standardized tests arguing that they do not accurately reflect a student’s academic ability.

“Research has repeatedly proved that students from wealthy families score higher on the SAT and ACT, compared to students from low-income families,” reports CNN. It’s important to note that the analysis by Inside Higher Ed revealed that the “lowest average scores for each part of the SAT came from students with less than $20,000 in family income. The highest scores came from those with more than $200,000 in family income.”

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