Things That Matter

Donald Trump Signed A New Spending Bill To Avoid A Government Shutdown And Didn’t Get Wall Funding

President Donald Trump signed a new spending bill to avoid a government shut down and no money is being used to build the border wall. Trump ran his campaign on the promise of building a border wall along the U.S.-Mexico border and that Mexico would be paying for the wall. Of course, Trump has not been able to deliver on that campaign promise and, once again, Trump bowed and signed a spending bill with no provision for the border wall.

President Trump signed a new spending bill to avoid a government shutdown but without wall funding.

Trump signed the bill to fund the government for a year while the American public watched the Senate Judiciary Committee handle the Kavanaugh hearings. The Senate Judiciary Committee advanced Judge Brett Kavanaugh’s nomination to the Senate despite multiple allegations of sexual misconduct.

The proposed border wall was a major campaign promise and has been a focal point of contention with Mexico.

“They make all of this money, and they do absolutely nothing to stop people from going through Mexico, from Honduras and all these other countries, the caravan, all of this stuff,” Trump said during a rally in Nashville, Tennessee. “They do nothing to help us, nothing.”

Trump has avoided bringing up his wall pledge in public since the topic led the Mexican President to cancel plans for a visit to Washington early in Trump’s term.

Mexican President Enrique Pena Nieto has unequivocally denied that Mexico will ever pay for the wall.

“NO. Mexico will NEVER pay for a wall. Not now, not ever,” President Enrique Nieto wrote, in both English and Spanish. “Sincerely, Mexico (all of us).” It’s not the first time Peña Nieto has denied this.

The wall has strained relations between the two nations and impacted North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) talks.

The U.S., Mexico and Canada recently reworked NAFTA and created the United States-Mexico-Canada Agreement. It is being billed as an updated version of NAFTA.

“USMCA will give our workers, farmers, ranchers, and businesses a high-standard trade agreement that will result in freer markets, fairer trade and robust economic growth in our region,” reads a joint statement by US Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer and Canadian Foreign Minister Chrystia Freeland. “It will strengthen the middle class, and create good, well-paying jobs and new opportunities for the nearly half billion people who call North America home.”

Former Mexico President Vicente Fox has long rejected the idea that Mexico will fund any border wall.

The former President of Mexico has consistently denied Donald Trump’s claims that Mexico will pay for the border wall. He has been on the record multiple times about his displeasure with the wall and has commonly responded with his now signature line “Mexico is not paying for that f****n wall.”

Last October, prototypes were revealed in San Diego for the proposed border wall with exact details and funding source yet to be revealed.

The president has said he wants as much as $25 billion for the border wall that could take about 10 years to complete, but the $1.3-trillion spending bill he signed back in March authorized only $1.6 billion for fencing, surveillance and other security measures. This leaves many open questions on who and what will pay for the border wall.


READ: Trump Plans To Offer DACA Recipients Citizenship If U.S. Tax Dollars Can Be Used To Pay For The Border Wall

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A University Is Releasing A Historic Mexican Cookbook Filled With Recipes You’d Want To Try

Culture

A University Is Releasing A Historic Mexican Cookbook Filled With Recipes You’d Want To Try

UTSA

The University of Texas San Antonio is bringing the history of Mexico into our kitchens. The university is releasing cookbooks that are collections of historic Mexican recipes. Right now, the desserts book is out and online for free. Main dishes and appetizers/drinks are coming soon.

You can now taste historic Mexico thanks to the University of Texas San Antonio.

UTSA has had an ongoing project of preserving, collecting, and digitizing cookbooks from throughout Mexico’s history. Some books date back to the 1700s and offer a look into Mexico’s culinary arts and its evolution.

UTSA has been digitizing Mexican cookbooks for years and the work is now being collected for people in the time of Covid.

Millions of us are still at home and projects like these can be very exciting and exactly what you need. The recipes are a way to distract yourself from the current reality.

“The e-pubs allow home cooks to use the recipes as inspiration in their own kitchens,” Dean Hendrix, the dean of UTSA Libraries, said in UTSA Today. “Our hope is that many more people will not only have access to these wonderful recipes but also interact with them and experience the rich culture and history contained in the collection.”

The free downloads are a way for people to get a very in-depth look into Mexican food history.

The first of three volumes of the cookbooks focuses on desserts so you can learn how to make churros, chestnut flan, buñelos, and rice pudding. What better way to spend your quarantine than learning how to make some of these yummy desserts. We all love sweets, right?

If you want to get better with making your favorite desserts, check out this cookbook and make it happen.

There is nothing better than diving into your history and using food as your guide. Food is so intrinsically engrained in our DNAs and identities. We love the foods and sweets from our childhood because they hold a clue as to who we are and where we come from. This historical collection of recipes throughout history is the perfect way to make that happen.

READ: The Laziest Food Hacks In All Of The Land Would Send Your Abuela To The Chancla

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Instead Of Celebrating Her Quince, This Teen Donated It All To Help Victims Of Covid-19

Things That Matter

Instead Of Celebrating Her Quince, This Teen Donated It All To Help Victims Of Covid-19

JiromyXool / Facebook

Few days are as important or as celebrated as a teenager’s 15th birthday. So imagine the level of selflessness one must have to be able to say ‘no, I don’t want any of the celebration, I rather help out my community.’

Well, one teen in Merida, Mexico did just that this week when she told her family ‘thanks, but no thanks’ to her big quince and instead used the money that had been raised for her special day to help out her neighbors who have been impacted by the Coronavirus pandemic.

Her party was canceled thanks to Coronavirus, so she decided to help out those less fortunate.

In many countries across Latin America, the quinceañera is a huge milestone for teenagers. Beautiful dresses, visits from the entire family, big parties, and the best gifts are the norm at most quinces. But for 15-year-old Jiromy Xool Pech, instead of spending money on a lavish birthday celebration, she opted to use her party funds to help feed the needy.

Jiromy and her family had long planned her quinceañera – she had been looking forward to it for years. But with the pandemic hitting her community in Mérida particularly hard, the teen decided to put the party aside and use everything that had been invested in the ceremony to help her neighbors who have been impacted by the pandemic.

“Instead of partying, I prefer to give food to people, to help them with that,” Jiromy told El Universal. Jiromy not only asked to donate the money for her quince to the community, but she was also out there helping distribute the food to her neighbors.

Jiromy and her family weren’t alone in helping out the community either. Much of the food that was given out was prepared from by neighbors and local businesses that came to join Jiromy’s cause once word began to spread.

Unfortunately, many quinceañeras have been canceled or postponed thanks to the Coronavirus pandemic.

Credit: Diego Sanchez / Getty Images

One of Mexico City’s most famous markets for buying quince dresses – el Mercado Lagunilla – has been closed for three months. This ins’t just hating a major impact on dressmakers and salespeople, but it also means that young teens aren’t able to buy the dresses to celebrate their big day.

But not all is completely lost: there are those who have begun to return, like Ximena González, who came with her family to try on dresses. Her quince was scheduled for May 16, but the pandemic changed everything, and now they expect it to take place in November.

“I was scared and upset but I had to accept it. Some friends can no longer go because they are moving,” she told El Universal. She added, “I hope that when it is my party the infections have gone down and that everything is done as if nothing had happened.”

Mexico has been hit particularly hard by the pandemic, including Jiromy’s hometown of Merida.

Jiromy’s selfless act to help her community comes as Mexico continues to see record breaking numbers of cases. Tens of thousands are dying and even more are losing their jobs and being forced back into poverty.

As of August 6, Mexico has more than 456,000 confirmed cases of Covid-19 and 49,698 people have died from the virus. In Jiromy’s state of Yucatan, there have been more than 10,000 cases of the virus and it’s had a huge impact on tourism, which is a major economic force in the state. Therefore, it makes sense that the 15-year-old thought it was important to use the money raised for her party to help those who are suffering financially.

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