things that matter

Don Omar Sold Tickets To His Retirement Show In Puerto Rico For 99¢ And Will Be Donating Over $300K To Hurricane Irma Relief

Reggaeton star (and occasional actor) Don Omar will be going back to Puerto Rico in December for his retirement tour and he’s giving fans the hookup by selling tickets to his shows for 99¢. The announcement was initially a Christmas gift for fans on the island, which is currently in a $120 billion dollar financial debt crisis. That sense of charity has evolved in the wake of Hurricane Irma. In addition to the cheap tickets, Don Omar has also decided to donate proceeds from the three-day concert series to relief efforts on the island.

The week before Hurricane Irma became a threat, Don Omar had already announced he would be selling tickets for the Puerto Rican leg of his retirement tour for 99¢.

A post shared by DON OMAR (@donomar) on

 Part of his Instagram caption read:

Don Omar says goodbye to the stage with this Magna tour. He recognizes the crisis of his beloved Puerto Rico and is offering tickets starting at 99¢ as a gift… Feeling a deep bond with his roots and his people, the “Danza Kuduro” singer will perform the series of concerts this 15th, 16th and 17th of December in the Coliseo de Puerto Rico José Miguel Agrelot. This is a special time, a significant moment in his career, and recognizing the difficult times that the island is experiencing, the greatest producer of urban music has decided to give his audience the opportunity to be with him and enjoy his talent at prices never before seen… this is a Christmas gift from the artist himself, after his great desire to say goodbye surrounded by his faithful fans. “

In the wake of Irma’s destruction, Don Omar shared an emotional post where he committed to donating $100k per night on his three nights performing in Puerto Rico.

A post shared by DON OMAR (@donomar) on

There was an equally heartwarming caption, including Don Omar’s own memories of hardship at the hands of Atlantic hurricanes:

Just days before tickets go on sale for his concerts in Puerto Rico, Don Omar announced that he will donate USD $100,000.00 for each night of music during the 3 days of events… The urban superstar, who was in Puerto Rico during Hurricane Irma identifies with those affected: “During the hurricane, in 1989, my family lost everything, we had no place to live and no clothes to wear… these are horrible moments that those affected have to live with. In 1998 the passage of Hurricane George again destroyed everything that we had worked so hard for and once more we had to demonstrate as a family how willing we were to get ahead. Many good people helped us, the memories that in an instant we went from having everything to suddenly having nothing will always live in my mind.”

Don Omar has taken an active role in relief efforts, sending funds, supplies, and clothes to areas affected by Irma.

Don Omar shared photos of donations that he received for all affected by Hurricane Irma. It seems like help is going to all islands affected. “Help has already begun for those affected by Hurricane Irma # puertorico # cuba # barbuda # stmarteen Thank you all!”

The aftermath of natural disasters can be pretty grim, but Don Omar is definitely trying to spread the hope and love.

“Any donation however small is important for those who lost everything … We wait for you with an open heart.” An open heart indeed.


[H/T] Billboard

READ: Although They Don’t Speak The Same Language, These Two Hurricane Harvey Survivors Shared An Emotional Moment


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These Latinx Queer Organizations Need Your Money More Than You Need Corporate Rainbow Socks

Culture

These Latinx Queer Organizations Need Your Money More Than You Need Corporate Rainbow Socks

it_gets_better_project / Instagram

Come PRIDE month, we see every company from REI to Target slapping a rainbow on their brand to support the LGBTQ+ movement. That’s great–it’s always a comfort to see someone displaying a symbol of safety and inclusion.

However, we have to do more than that. The LGBTQ+ movement has certainly made strides since 1969, but we’re still being murdered in the streets and ejected out of our careers in the federal government. There isn’t enough space for us to have the same opportunities as straight folks, and the numbers get worse for queer people of color. So go buy those rainbow socks and then throw twenty bucks to one of these organizations supporting LGBTQ+ Latinos in other ways.

It Gets Better Project

@it_gets_better_project / Instagram

We saw a slew of celebrities in the last ten years join forces with the It Gets Better Project. Founded by Dan Savage in 2010, the social media campaign aims to highlight stories targeted toward LGBT youth to prove that it gets better. More than half of trans people attempt suicide at some point in their lives. We need this campaign.

Donate here.

The Trevor Project

@trevorproject / Instagram

After the Academy Awards honored short film “Trevor,” the Trevor Project has exploded to offer suicide hotline services to LGBTQ+ youth under 25 years of age. The organization has grown with the times to also offer webchat and text message services, saving lives 24/7.

Donate here.

The Los Angeles LGBT Center

Los Angeles LGBT Center / Facebook

Los Angeles is a city made of near majority Latinos, which means that the LA LGBT Center might be the most comprehensive health service provider of LGBT Latinos in the country. Not only does the center offer mental health services, housing for homeless youth, and job training for one of the most marginalized communities in the country, their advocacy team is actively getting bills passed that provide funding for these services.

Donate here.

The Trans Latina Coalition

@translatinacoalition / Instagram

Trans Latinas who immigrate to the U.S. to seek asylum from their probable murders in their home country arrive at Trump administration’s Immigration and Customs Enforcement detention centers for basic human rights abuses. The TLC is offering resources to trans Latinas in detention centers in California, Florida, Chicago, Texas, and the Washington areas.

Donate here if you think immigration is an LGBTQ+ issue.

The National Queer and Trans Therapists of Color Network

@nqttcn / Instagram

If you’re a QPOC you know how impossible it is to find mental health resources that are culturally competent enough to actually treat our mental health needs resulting from discrimination. It’s infuriating. This organization offers an actual network of therapists and we need it to grow.

Donate here.

Pride Fund to End Gun Violence

@Pride_Fund / Twitter

This Political Action Committee (PAC) is supporting candidates who are demanding gun policy reform as informed by the fatalities the LGBT community grieves because of gun violence. The PAC was formed after the Pulse nightclub shooting in Orlando and has helped get folks into the positions of power needed to change gun laws.

Donate here.

Casa De Esperanza

@casa_de_esperanza / Instagram

Based in Minnesota, this group is working to end domestic violence in the Latinx community by offering shelter and hotline. More than 50 percent of queer Latinas have experienced physical violence, rape or stalking by their partners. This organization is working to respond to the needs of these women.

Donate here.

National Latina Institute For Reproductive Health

@NLIRH / Twitter

Caption: “Nearly 31% of Black women of reproductive age and 27% of Latinas of reproductive age are enrolled in #Medicaid.”

The NLIRH is a crucial element in understanding and preventing gender inequalities for Latinas, specifically. They are doing the research that nobody else will, to understand how brown women fair in reproductive justice. The group fights for abortion access and immigrant health rights and so much more.

Donate here.

Nalgona Positivity Pride

@nalgonapositivitypride / Instagram

If you can’t donate, you need to follow @nalgonapositivitypride to get indigenous body positivity in your feed. Founder Gloria Lucas is tapping into something we feel in our bones–the colonization of our minds and how living in a white society has created a crisis of eating disorders rampant among communities of color. The NPP offers educational resources and support groups for survivors.

Donate here.

Mijente

@conmijente / Instagram

Marisa Franco created Mijente to co-conspire campaigns for Latinx, Chicanx and Black rights. This is intersectionality at its finest, prioritizing queer, poor women of color through organizing. Don’t give up on organizing–it’s given us PRIDE!

Donate here.

Equality Federation

@equalityfed / Twitter

This Federation is organizing state-based organizations to target the federal government to meet LGBT people where they are. Just recently, they’ve demanded the government invest in public education and divest from privately run charter schools that preach abstinence and exclude LGBT history from their curriculums.

Donate here.

Casa Ruby

@CasaRubyDC / Twitter

Trans Salvadoreña Ruby Corado has created a safe space in Washington D.C. for LGBTQ youth. As trans youth begin to transition, the cost of clothing to adjust to their rapidly changing bodies is often too expensive for anyone to bear. Casa Ruby offers clothing exchanges, hot meals, and housing referrals, as well as legal counseling for youth.

Donate here.

These organizations give LGBTQ+ Latinx people somewhere to turn to. This is what PRIDE is all about.

READ: Boston Heteros Are Calling For A Straight Pride Parade And Twitter Is Not Having It

If You’re Heading to Pride This Month, Be Sure To Drop That Money On These LGBTQ+ Organizations Too

Things That Matter

If You’re Heading to Pride This Month, Be Sure To Drop That Money On These LGBTQ+ Organizations Too

We’ve put together a list of groups run by Latinxs that benefit LGBTQ+ people, for you to consider gifting this Pride Month. Beware! Contributing to these organizations this month will work to ensure that the gente of this community will be provided with access to education, mental health services, and support for years to come after you donate. No matter how big or small your contribution is, know that this counts!

1. Pride Fund to End Gun Violence

The Political Action Committee (PAC) that is Pride Fund to End Gun Violence works to support candidates who will push for gun policy reform while also fighting for the safety and continued support of the LGBTQ+ community. The organization was founded in the aftermath of the Pulse nightclub shooting in Orlando and has made makes disarming those who are against the LGBTQ+ community a vital issue.

Donate here.

2. TransLatin@ Coalition

The TransLatin@ Coalition is a national organization advocating for the needs of U.S.-based trans immigrant Latinas and producing resources to empower trans leaders. With a presence in California, Florida, Chicago, Texas and the DMV (Washington, DC, Maryland and Virginia) area, the women work directly with policymakers and change-makers to find solutions to issues impacting the trans Latina community and instill lasting structural changes.

Donate here.

3. Mijente

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#Lanzate #Lanzate2016 #PuertoRico

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Mijente is a national political home for Latinx and Chicanx digital and grassroots organizing. The pro-Black, pro-woman, pro-queer and pro-poor space, which is headed and co-founded by Marisa Franco, is one for strategizing, co-conspiring, campaigning and strengthening our movements as well as connecting and resting.

Donate here.

4. Equality Federation

Equality Federation works with state-based organizations advocating for LGBTQ people. From Equality Florida to Freedom Oklahoma to Basic Rights Oregon, the organization works to magnify the power of LGBTQ+ people at a local level.

Donate here.

5. Nalgona Positivity Pride

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Yesterday 💕

A post shared by NPP (@nalgonapositivitypride) on

Nalgona Positivity Pride is a Xicana-Brown*-Indigenous body positive project that provides intersectional body positivity, eating disorders awareness and cultural affirmation. Founder Gloria Lucas created the space in an effort to examine how historical trauma and social oppression, like racism, colonialism and homophobia, can lead to violent relationships with food and eating disorders in communities of color. NPP offers much-needed support groups and educational resources for survivors and sufferers who are repeatedly erased from eating disorder research and advocacy.

Donate here.

6. Casa Ruby

Casa Ruby is a bilingual, multicultural organization providing life-saving services and programs for LGBTQ youth. The Washington, D.C.-based group, founded and run by trans salvadoreña Ruby Corado, offers a drop-in community center that provides hot meals, clothing exchanges and housing referrals as well as support groups, case management and legal services counseling.

Donate here.

7. Casa De Esperanza

Casa de Esperanza is a Minnesota-based organization working toward ending domestic violence in the Latinx community. Locally, the group, which has its own hotline and shelter, helps survivors of domestic violence access public benefits, seek immigration remedies, provide court advocacy, navigate law enforcement systems, find transitional housing and provide emotional support, while also educating youth on healthy relationships. Nationally, the bilingual organization participates in public policy advocacy and conducts culturally relevant research.

Donate here.

8. National Latina Institute For Reproductive Health

The National Latina Institute for Reproductive Health (NLIRH) is the sole national reproductive justice organization dedicated to guarding and advancing health, dignity and justice for U.S. Latinas and their families. With headquarters in New York and Washington, D.C., and sites in Florida, Texas and Virginia, the group fights for abortion access and affordability, sexual and reproductive health equity and immigrant women’s health and rights, among so much more.

Donate here.

9. The National Queer and Trans Therapists of Color Network

The National Queer and Trans Therapists of Color Network aims to transform the way queer and trans people of color are provided mental health care. The group works to provide a community of resource sharing, community, support, as well as connection and learning among queer and trans people of color. The organization’s Mental Health Fund for Queer and Trans People of Color provides financial assistance to those who struggle to receive access to mental health support. It also highlights the economic problems that queer and trans people of color are often faced to battle on their own when dealing with the healthcare system.

Donate here.

10. Trevor Project

Founded in 1998 by the creators of the Academy Award-winning short film “Trevor,” the organization provides crisis intervention and suicide prevention services to LGTBQ+ youth under the age of 25. Since its creation, hundreds of thousands of young people in crisis have accessed The Trevor Project’s multiple resources. Such resources have included a 24-hour mental health hotline, webchat, and text message services.

Donate here.

11. It Gets Better Project

By now, you probably already know the It Gets Better Project. The nonprofit organization which has worked to empower LGBTQ youth has long been supported by celebrities the world over. The company’s ultimate goal has been to show LGBTQ youth that the devasting experiences of our adolescence won’t always be our experiences.

Donate here.

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