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Denver Undocumented Immigrant Jeanette Vizguerra Has Been Granted A Stay Of Removal

The Denver Post / YouTube

Jeanette Vizguerra has been living in a Denver church since February, fearing deportation and being separated from her four children. Finally, after three months, Vizguerra has been granted a stay of removal until 2019 and is free to leave the church in time for Mother’s Day. Vizguerra made international headlines when a private bill was introduced in Congress to offer her permanent residency, making her a prominent face of the immigration debate under President Trump’s administration. She has even been named one of TIME’s 100 Most Influential People of 2017.

Vizguerra, an undocumented mother of four, has been granted a stay of removal.


Jeanette Vizguerra has spent the last three months hiding in the First Unitarian Society of Denver to avoid being deported. Vizguerra sought sanctuary in the church instead of attending a scheduled check-in with Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE). After learning her original stay of removal order had expired, Vizguerra feared she would be deported, so she made the decision to stay in the church.

Vizguerra is the second immigrant in Denver this month to be granted a stay of removal after fears of deportation forced them to seek refuge.


Vizguerra and Arturo Hernandez Garcia are both undocumented immigrants living in Denver. Hernandez Garcia was recently given a much shorter stay of only 30 days which allows for him to see his daughter graduate from high school.

The announcement of Vizguerra’s stay comes just days before Mother’s Day.


“It’s a special day for me because I will be able to celebrate Mother’s Day with my children and grandchildren,” Vizguerra said at a press conference, according to TIME. “Their struggle is my struggle, and my struggle is their struggle, because we are a community.”

Representative Diana DeGette, who represents Colorado’s 1st District, celebrated the decision.


“ICE finally chose justice and granted a stay for Jeanette, freeing her from the church basement where she has sought shelter these past few months, and Arturo’s circumstances have been resolved for the moment,” DeGette said in a statement on her website.  “But such situations should never arise in the first place.  People who contribute to their communities and live peacefully for decades in this country – at a time when immigrants of all types are being demonized – deserve better. Congress needs to get serious about comprehensive immigration reform rather than continuing with the patchwork of measures that we now have.  And in the meantime, the Executive Branch needs to show more compassion.”

Vizguerra’s supporters joined her as she left the church this morning for the first time in years.


People were excited to see Vizguerra finally make her way out of the church basement she called home for months.

People are expressing their joy that Vizguerra gets to enjoy her time with family for Mother’s Day.


Others are reminding people that this is just a part of the larger issue of immigration reform.


Some are asking for Vizguerra to be given an indefinite stay.


You can watch her full press conference below.

Credit: The Denver Post / YouTube

(H/T: The Denver Post)


READ: His Wife Had To Stop Him From Going Back To Work Since He Only Has 30 Days Before ICE Takes Him Back

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"Some Girls" Documentary Tackles Why Depression Is Prevalent Among Latinas

Things That Matter

“Some Girls” Documentary Tackles Why Depression Is Prevalent Among Latinas

RAQUEL CEPEDA / SOMEGIRLSDOC / INSTAGRAM

Depression affects a large segment of the population, but no group of people knows this better than teenage Latinas.


As Latina points out, in 2011, depression was reported to affect around 41 percent of Latinas, the highest among all ethnic groups, and affecting those living in New York the most. In an attempt to understand why this was and what could be done about it, award-winning journalist Raquel Cepeda began documenting a journey that would take her through Latin America with several teenage Latinx New Yorkers, who were part of a suicide prevention program. Their goal was to understand the role culture and identity play in fostering depression among Latina teens.

The documentary “Some Girls” is the result of Cepeda’s journey through Latin America with these teens.


In her interview with Latina, Cepeda reveals several insights she gained while working with these teens in Latin America. Many of the problems, she notes, come from identity, saying, “teens, regardless of what race they are, they’re already dealing with issues.” Adding, “If you compound these typical teenage issues with this feeling of invisibility, then that only makes the problem worse.” She attributes a source of their depression to negative stereotypes that politicians perpetuate to the media. If they aren’t invisible, they are part of the “problems” with society.

Cepeda also discusses how a lack of ethnic studies in school can lead to a lack of role models for these adolescent girls, despite evidence that ethnic studies are more engaging among minorities.

According to Latina, “Some Girls” was just completed and is looking for distribution.

RAQUEL CEPEDA / VIMEO

Throughout the film, Cepeda uncovers many other factors that contribute to the alarming levels of depression that affect the Latinx community. Her Latina interview definitely worth reading, which is linked below.

[H/T] Latina: This Powerful Documentary Offers a Much-Needed Look Into Latina Identity, Depression and Self-Harm

READ: John Leguizamo Calls On Latino Celebs To Boycott Texas Because Of New Anti-Immigrant Law

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