Things That Matter

Denver Undocumented Immigrant Jeanette Vizguerra Has Been Granted A Stay Of Removal

Jeanette Vizguerra has been living in a Denver church since February, fearing deportation and being separated from her four children. Finally, after three months, Vizguerra has been granted a stay of removal until 2019 and is free to leave the church in time for Mother’s Day. Vizguerra made international headlines when a private bill was introduced in Congress to offer her permanent residency, making her a prominent face of the immigration debate under President Trump’s administration. She has even been named one of TIME’s 100 Most Influential People of 2017.

Vizguerra, an undocumented mother of four, has been granted a stay of removal.


Jeanette Vizguerra has spent the last three months hiding in the First Unitarian Society of Denver to avoid being deported. Vizguerra sought sanctuary in the church instead of attending a scheduled check-in with Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE). After learning her original stay of removal order had expired, Vizguerra feared she would be deported, so she made the decision to stay in the church.

Vizguerra is the second immigrant in Denver this month to be granted a stay of removal after fears of deportation forced them to seek refuge.


Vizguerra and Arturo Hernandez Garcia are both undocumented immigrants living in Denver. Hernandez Garcia was recently given a much shorter stay of only 30 days which allows for him to see his daughter graduate from high school.

The announcement of Vizguerra’s stay comes just days before Mother’s Day.


“It’s a special day for me because I will be able to celebrate Mother’s Day with my children and grandchildren,” Vizguerra said at a press conference, according to TIME. “Their struggle is my struggle, and my struggle is their struggle, because we are a community.”

Representative Diana DeGette, who represents Colorado’s 1st District, celebrated the decision.


“ICE finally chose justice and granted a stay for Jeanette, freeing her from the church basement where she has sought shelter these past few months, and Arturo’s circumstances have been resolved for the moment,” DeGette said in a statement on her website.  “But such situations should never arise in the first place.  People who contribute to their communities and live peacefully for decades in this country – at a time when immigrants of all types are being demonized – deserve better. Congress needs to get serious about comprehensive immigration reform rather than continuing with the patchwork of measures that we now have.  And in the meantime, the Executive Branch needs to show more compassion.”

Vizguerra’s supporters joined her as she left the church this morning for the first time in years.


People were excited to see Vizguerra finally make her way out of the church basement she called home for months.

People are expressing their joy that Vizguerra gets to enjoy her time with family for Mother’s Day.


Others are reminding people that this is just a part of the larger issue of immigration reform.


Some are asking for Vizguerra to be given an indefinite stay.


You can watch her full press conference below.

Credit: The Denver Post / YouTube

(H/T: The Denver Post)


READ: His Wife Had To Stop Him From Going Back To Work Since He Only Has 30 Days Before ICE Takes Him Back

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Ecuadorian Sisters, 3 And 5, Dropped By Smugglers From 14 Ft High Mexico-US Border Wall

Things That Matter

Ecuadorian Sisters, 3 And 5, Dropped By Smugglers From 14 Ft High Mexico-US Border Wall

A recent video shared by a border patrol agent highlighted a shocking moment of smugglers literally dropping two little girls over a 14-foot high fence in the New Mexico desert. Right in the dead of night.

In the disturbing video, the smugglers can be seen climbing the fence and then dropping the two 5-year-old and 3-year-old sisters to the ground.

El Paso Sector Chief Patrol Agent Gloria Chavez shared that the incident occurred “miles from the nearest residence.”

The two little girls (Yareli, 3, and Yasmina, 5) were rescued after agents spotted them during a virtual surveillance sweep. The two sisters are from Ecuador and were dumped by human smugglers at the border wall according to an official.

“[US Immigration officials] need to verify the identity of the parents and confirm they are the parents and make sure they are in good condition to receive the girls,” Magdalena Nunez, of the Consulate of Ecuador in Houston, explained to The New York Post on Thursday. “It’s a process … We’re working to make sure it’s an expedited process and the girls spend as minimal time as possible separated from their parents.”

“Hopefully it can happen soon, in a week or two, but  it can take up to six weeks. We are working to make sure sure it happens as quickly as possible,” she explained before noting that the two sisters are “doing very well.”

“We have been in contact with them and confirmed they are in good health,” Nunez shared. “Physically, they are perfect — emotionally, obviously, they went through a hard time, but I guarantee you right now they are in good health and they are conversing. They are very alert, very intelligent.”

In a statement about the incident, the Ecuadorian consulate confirmed that the two girls had been in touch with their parents, who live in New York City.

“The Ecuadorian Consulate in Houston had a dialogue with the minors and found that they are in good health and that they contacted their parents, who currently live in New York City,” explained the consulate.

In a statement from the girls’ parents sent to Telemundo, the girls’ parents had left their daughters behind at their home in Jaboncillo, Ecuador, to travel to the US. The parents of the two girls have been identified as Yolanda Macas Tene and Diego Vacacela Aguilar. According to the New York Post, “The girls’ grandparents have asked President Biden to reunite the children with their parents. Aguilar paid a human smuggler to take his kids to the border — though the grandparents didn’t know how much they paid.”

“[The parents] wanted to be with them, their mother suffered a lot, for that reason they decided to take them,” paternal grandfather Lauro Vacacela explained in an interview with Univision.

It is still uncertain as to whether or not the girls’ parents are in the country legally.

Photos of the girls showed them having snacks with Agent Gloria Chavez.

“When I visited with these little girls, they were so loving and so talkative, some of them were asking the names of all the agents that were there around them, and they even said they were a little hungry,” Chavez told Fox News. “So I helped them peel a banana and open a juice box and just talked to them. You know, children are just so resilient and I’m so grateful that they’re not severely injured or [have] broken limbs or anything like that.”

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This Migrant Mother Spent Three Years In Church Sanctuary But Now She’s Free

Things That Matter

This Migrant Mother Spent Three Years In Church Sanctuary But Now She’s Free

Lawyers are working hard to get a deportation order removed against a woman who just left a church sanctuary after three years in the refuge. Although she was previously denied asylum in the U.S., advocates are hoping that under new direction from the Biden administration, her case will be reviewed and she’ll be able to stay with her family in Ohio – where she’s lived for more than twenty years.

A mother of three is back with her family after living three years inside a church.

A mother of three who sought refugee inside an Ohio church from immigration authorities has finally been able to leave three years later. Edith Espinal, who herself is an immigrant rights advocate, had been living at the Columbus Mennonite Church since October 2017 to avoid being deported to Mexico. She’s now out of the church and back with her family following a meeting with Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) officials, who have agreed that she’s not an immediate priority for deportation.

“Finally, I can go home,” Espinal told reporters after meeting with the officials. With tears of relief, she celebrated the small victory in the presence of dozens of supporters who accompanied her to the ICE building.

“But it is not the end of her case. We’re still going to have to fight,” her attorney Lizbeth Mateo said.

ICE has agreed to hold off on her deportation proceedings pending her asylum request.

Espinal was released under an order of supervision, meaning that while she’s not considered an immediate priority for deportation, she must periodically check in with ICE officials to inform them about her whereabouts.

She has lived in Columbus for more than two decades and had previously applied for asylum, citing rising violence in her home state of Michoacán. But she eventually was ordered to leave the country, which is when she sought refuge inside the Columbus, Ohio church.

“We’re going to continue pressing the Biden administration to do the right thing, and try to get rid of that order of deportation against Edith, so she can walk freely like everyone else does without fear,” Mateo said during the press conference.

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