Things That Matter

Experts Are Warning The U.S. Supreme Court About The Economic Impacts Of Rescinding DACA Protections

In June, it was announced that the fates of almost 1 million people brought to the country illegally as children, known as DREAMers, would now be in the hands of the U.S. Supreme Court. The case will be brought up as an appeal to the Trump administration’s decision to end the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program back in Fall 2017. The hearing is set to happen before the high court’s next term and will decide the legality of the Obama-era program. The argument focuses on if-then President Barack Obama acted legally in enacting the program. If so, the Trump administration could revoke the program as long as it shows good reasoning to do so. 

DACA provided temporary legal status for participants and protected them from deportation. This included the ability to work in the U.S. It also became a focal point in the debate over Trump’s proposed US-Mexico border wall back in February and his plans to take on illegal immigration. A ruling is expected in the 2020 election year, putting the highest court in the land at the center of this divisive issue. 

Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) beneficiaries are waiting on the Supreme Court decision on the program that could protect them or hurt them.

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There will certainly come disappointment and growing fears from those who were protected under DACA if the Supreme Court sides with the Trump administration. Experts are pointing to the likelihood that the removal of the program could cause harm to the U.S. economy as a whole. The removal of DACA would include the loss of thousands of U.S. jobs and taxes that would force more people into illegal hiring practice.  

“Getting rid of DACA will reduce economic growth and cost our federal, state, and local governments about $95 billion in foregone tax revenues, without any appreciable employment gains for U.S. citizens,” Ike Branon writes in an op-ed for Forbes.

When it comes to education, DACA recipients, who must have graduated from high school to qualify for the program, are on par with their U.S. citizen counterparts. This comes despite facing multiple roadblocks when it comes to receiving student aid or certain loans to pursue a college degree. According to the Migration Policy Institute, 55 percent of DACA recipients were employed back in 2017. This translates to 382,000 workers paying taxes and strengthening the U.S. economy.

With so limited financial aid options for school, many DACA recipients must take on one to two jobs to help support themselves through their college years. Branon writes that “the labor force participation rates of DACA recipients is above that of the general population,” signaling to contrary belief that true makeup of this group. 

If a court decision sides with the Trump administration there is a strong possibility of mass deportations of more than one million young adults residing in the U.S. under DACA protection.

Credit: Unsplash

The Supreme Court’s decision has a lot at stake that will affect more than just DACA recipients. There is the probability that many of those young adults under protection would lose their jobs due to their legal status. This would also certainly have a significant negative impact on the U.S. economy and cause some concern in the overall job marketplace. 

A large portion of DACA recipients are “well-educated workers” that have some obtained a college degree. Almost half a million of those degrees would be rendered useless due to the changed legal status of those recipients if the program is rescinded. It would be difficult to simply fill those high-skilled jobs and do so without disrupting the overall U.S. economy. 

There is the potential loss of billions of economic and tax dollars that would be lost without having those protected under DACA part of the U.S economy. While the number is still uncertain, estimated figures see the economic impact from rescinding DACA of roughly $200 billion in the next 10 years. The loss of tax revenue would be close to $60 billion. 

There is enough evidence to support having permanent protections for DACA recipients.

Credit: Unsplash

Whether it’s jobs or more educated people in the U.S., there is no doubt that applying permanent DACA protections would create more prosperity. The statistics show creating a pathway for legal citizenship is beneficial for all and will only cause more harm than good is rescinded. 

So what are the odds that the Supreme Court sides with DACA? 

The court currently has a conservative majority of 5-4 but many believe that vote will come down to conservative Chief Justice John Roberts, who has leaned liberal in recent years. We will have to wait until the court’s next term to find out the fate of one of the most politically charged issues of our time.

READ: DACA Recipients Will Finally Be Heard At The US Supreme Court In A Case That Could Decide Their Future

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Report Shows That Immigration Narratives On TV Are Latinx-Focused And Over-Emphasize Crime

Entertainment

Report Shows That Immigration Narratives On TV Are Latinx-Focused And Over-Emphasize Crime

The media advocacy group Define American recently released a study that focused on the way immigrant characters are depicted on television. The second-annual study is entitled “Change the Narrative, Change the World”.

Although the study reports progress in some areas of onscreen representation, there is still a long way to go.

For example, the study reported that half of the immigrant characters depicted on television are Latino, which is consistent with reality. What is not consistent with reality, however, is how crime-related storylines are still an overrepresented theme in these storylines.

The study shows that on television 22% of immigrant characters have crime storylines show up as part of their narratives. These types of storylines further pedal the false narrative that immigrants are criminals, when in reality, they’re just everyday people who are trying to lives their best lives. Ironically, this statistic is an improvement on the previous year’s statistics in which crime themes made up 34% of immigrants’ stories on TV.

These numbers are further proof that the media feels stories of Latino immigration have to be about sadness and hardship in order to be worth watching.

According to Define American’s website, their organization believes that “powerful storytelling is the catalyst that can reshape our country’s immigration narrative and generate significant cultural change.”

They believe that changing the narratives depicted in entertainment media can “reshape our country’s immigration narrative and generate significant cultural change.” 

“We wanted to determine if seeing the specific immigration storylines influenced [viewers’] attitudes, behavior, or knowledge in the real world,” said Sarah Lowe, the associate director of research and impact at Define American to Variety. “And we were reassured and inspired to see the impact it had.” 

Define American’s founder, Jose Antonio Vargas, is relatively optimistic about the study’s outcomes, saying that the report has “some promising findings” and the numbers “provide [him] with hope”. He added that there are still “many areas in which immigrant representation can improve”.

via Getty Images

Namely, Vargas was disappointed in television’s failure to take an intersectional approach to immigration in regards to undocumented Black immigrants. 

“Black undocumented immigrants are detained and deported at higher rates than other ethnic groups,” Vargas told Variety. “But their stories are largely left off-screen and left out of the larger narrative around immigration.” 

“Change the Narrative, Change the World” also showed that Asian and Pacific Islander immigrants are also under-represented on television compared with reality. Also worth noting, male immigrants were over-represented on television compared to reality, while immigrants with disabilities were also under-represented.

The study also showed that when viewers are exposed to TV storylines that humanize immigrants, they’re more likely to take action on immigration issues themselves. 

The effect that fictional entertainment narratives have on viewers further proves that representation does, indeed, matter. What we watch as entertainment changes the way we think about other people’s lived experiences. And that, in turn, can change the world.

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A Group Of TPS Beneficiaries Are Touring The Country In A Bus To Save The Crucial Immigration Program

Things That Matter

A Group Of TPS Beneficiaries Are Touring The Country In A Bus To Save The Crucial Immigration Program

tps_alliance / Instagram

Updated September 23, 2020

A coalition of people is coming together to stand up for Temporary Protected Status beneficiaries. Federal judges recently gave the Trump administration the approval to end the status for 300,000 people in the U.S.

A group of Temporary Protect Status holders is on a road trip to save the program for 300,000 people.

The National TPS Alliance is driving across the country to engage voters about the need to protect the program. The “Road to Justice” road tour started in Los Angeles and will be stopping in 54 cities in 32 states. The tour ends in Washington, D.C. where the TPS holders will petition Congress directly to save the program.

The program was started in 1990 and offers safe refuge for people who’s countries have experienced disaster, civil unrest, or other extraordinary circumstances. Some people who have been granted TPS in the U.S. include Central Americans after Hurricane Mitch, the second-largest hurricane in the Atlantic, devastated large swaths of the region in 1998. Haitians were also given TPS after the earthquake that devastated Port Au Prince in 2010.

The organization is hoping to engage voters and get them to care about the immigration crisis facing the nation. Activists have already praised the group and pledged to support their cause at the ballot box.

“We are going to vote for justice, for the TPS community,” Angélica Salas, executive director of the Coalition for Humane Immigrant Rights of Los Angeles, told NBC News. “President (Trump) and his administration are racist and do not care about the damage they are causing to our community.”

Original: A federal court just handed a huge ‘victory’ to the Trump administration, which has been eager to restart mass deportations. Despite a global health pandemic, the administration has been pressing forward with plans to deport hundreds of thousands of undocumented immigrants.

Until now, many of these migrants were safe from deportation thanks to Temporary Protected Status, which shields some immigrants from deportation under humanitarian claims. However, the recent court decision – in San Francisco’s 9th Circuit – gives Trump exactly what he wants right before the elections.

But how will it affect immigrant communities across the country? Here’s everything you need to know about this major decision.

The 9th Circuit Court just ended TPS for more than 300,000 undocumented immigrants.

A California appeals court on Monday gave the Trump Administration permission to end Temporary Protected Status for immigrants from El Salvador, Nicaragua, Haiti, and Sudan, clearing the way for officials to force more than 300,000 immigrants out of the country.

The decision affects people from all walks of life, many of whom have lived in the U.S. for decades, have U.S.-born children and have been considered essential workers during the coronavirus pandemic.

This week’s ruling from the circuit court comes after a district court (also in California) temporarily halted Trump’s plan to end TPS in late 2018 after a group of lawyers sued, arguing that Trump was motivated by racial discrimination.

“The president’s vile statements about TPS holders made perfectly clear that his administration acted out of racial animus,”Ahilan Arulanantham, a lawyer for the ACLU of Southern California, wrote in a statement. “The Constitution does not permit policy to be driven by racism. We will seek further review of the court’s decision.”

But today’s 2-1 decision reversed the district court’s temporary order and allowed the federal government to take away TPS protections while the court case continues.

ICE and DHS has promised to wait several months before taking away TPS status if the agency won in court. As a result, the ACLU told NPR that it expects the protections to start ending no sooner than March, meaning that Joe Biden could reverse the administration’s decision if he wins in November, though the organization plans to fight back in the meantime.

Temporary Protected Status was created to protect people in the U.S. from being sent back to dangerous places – and it’s saved lives.

Credit: Daniel Ortega / Getty Images

The TPS program was first introduced in 1990, and it has protected immigrants from more than 20 countries at various points since then. More than 300,000 people from 10 different nations currently use the program, some of whom have lived and worked in the United States for decades.

Trump has sharply criticized the program, sometimes along racial lines, and in one infamous and widely criticized incident two years ago, the president reportedly referred to the program’s beneficiaries as “people from shithole countries.”

TPS provides protection for short periods of up to 18 months, but the federal government has continuously extended it for the countries mentioned in the lawsuit “based on repeated findings that it remains unsafe to return.” 

As a result, it said, most TPS holders have been living in the U.S. for more than a decade, contributing to their communities and raising their families. Many of the more than 200,000 U.S.-citizen children of TPS holders have never been to the country their parents are from and would have to choose between their families and their homes.

The ruling will have a major impact on migrant families and communities across the U.S.

Credit: Chip Somodevilla / Getty Images

Immigration advocacy groups are slamming the court’s ruling, noting it will impact hundreds of thousands of TPS holders as well as their families and communities. In a statement, Beth Werlin, executive director of the American Immigration Council, said the decision will “plunge their lives into further turmoil at a time when we all need greater certainty.” 

As the global pandemic stretches on, immigrants with protected status make up a large portion of the country’s front-line workers. More than 130,000 TPS recipients are essential workers, according to the Center for American Progress. 

“TPS recipients have deep economic and social roots in communities across the nation,” said Ali Noorani, president and CEO of the National Immigration Forum. “And, as the U.S. responds to the COVID-19 pandemic, TPS recipients are standing shoulder to shoulder with Americans and doing essential work.”

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