Things That Matter

Conditions In Tijuana Are Getting Worse For Those Waiting To Claim Asylum

Things boiled over Sunday when groups of Central American asylum seekers in Tijuana, Mexico rushed the U.S border. U.S. Customs and Border Patrol agents responded by firing tear gas into the crowd of women and children. The asylum seekers had spent weeks in Tijuana as a last stop on their march to the U.S. border. The mayor of Tijuana declared the situation a humanitarian crisis and asked the United Nations for aid to deal with the approximately 5,000 Central American migrants.

Thousands of Central American migrants remain in Tijuana as they continue to try to seek asylum in the U.S.

Due to the large influx of asylum applicants, they may be there for months. Many are seeking asylum in the U.S. while others are seeking asylum in Mexico. The group of asylum seekers are fleeing economic instability and increasing violence in their home countries.

The San Ysidro entry point between Tijuana and San Diego is the busiest border crossing point in the world, yet agents at the facility can only process 100 applications a day. This has led Juan Manuel Gastelum, mayor of Tijuana, to declare the situation a humanitarian crisis. He says he won’t commit the city’s public resources to assisting the migrants and has asked for assistance from the United Nations.

According to the San Diego Tribune, the government of Baja California has treated 818 respiratory infections and provided 1,286 general medical consultations to asylum seekers.

There has reportedly been a pending agreement between both U.S. and Mexican governments that would force asylum seekers to remain in Mexico while the U.S. processes their claims.

According to the Washington Post, the Trump administration had made a deal with Mexico’s incoming president, Andrés Manuel López Obrador, to implement a policy that would have migrants stay in Mexico. This means that asylum seekers will wait in Mexico during the time it takes to apply for protection in the U.S.

While Mexico denied the report on Saturday, the news came out after a meeting between Mexico’s incoming foreign secretary, Marcelo Ebrard, Secretary of State Mike Pompeo, Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen, and other U.S. and Mexican officials. This could mean an agreement is still in the talks or can be modified in some way. The incoming Mexican administration will assume office December 1 which is critical in terms of timing when it comes to the situation at the border.

Applying for asylum is a legal process and the U.S. has been condemned for “unlawful policies” directed at the migrants.

Louis DeSipio, a professor of political science at University of California, Irvine, says that every migrant is legally allowed to apply for asylum, but it doesn’t mean they have the right to be accepted.

“The migrants have every right to seek asylum but what’s new and dangerous is the Trump administration trying to limit and make it harder for them to apply,” DeSipio said.

He says the tear gas incident over the weekend will only embolden the Trump administration to push forward with more stringent measures. Migrant caravans are nothing new but the issue has become a political talking point mainly because of the president’s constant attack on them. He has made baseless claims saying there are criminals in the caravan and even threatening to shut down the U.S.-Mexico border.

“This is all fitting into the president’s plan and will use it as evidence to justify sending troops to the Mexican border,” DeSipio said. “But closing down the border would have major implications going forward with Mexico in terms of legal entry and setting precedent.”

What’s next for the migrants waiting for their asylum claim?

After Sunday’s border clash, a number of migrants have opted to leave the caravan fearing their chances of seeking asylum are slim to none. DeSipio says many will stay and ride the process out considering they have no other options.

“These folks have no other option and it shows if they are willing to travel so many miles just to apply for asylum,” DeSipio says. “However long it’s going to take many will wait and some may risk their lives in the process.”

A new Mexican government and Democrats controlling the House of Representatives in the U.S. could complicate an already tense situation. President Trump continues to call for a border wall on the southern border and freshmen Democratic representatives ran their campaigns against the president’s tough line immigration stances.

“With the incoming [Mexican] administration and Democrats in control of the House, we’re going to see a showdown for funding for a border wall and the president doesn’t look like he’ll compromise,” DeSipio said. “At the end of the day what gets lost here is a tragedy. Many of these folks have a right to claim asylum but the president has essentially made that meaningless.”

This is a developing story. Check back with mitú for updates.


READ: Immigration Agents Launch Tear Gas Canisters At Asylum Seekers At US-Mexico Border

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A Group of Volunteer ‘Fairy Godmothers’ Threw a Lavish Quinceañera For This Homeless Teen Girl

Things That Matter

A Group of Volunteer ‘Fairy Godmothers’ Threw a Lavish Quinceañera For This Homeless Teen Girl

Photo via Getty Images

For most Latinas, having a quinceañera is a right-of-passage. Your quinceañera is the official milestone that proves you’re finally a woman. It’s a party that you look forward to your entire childhood. It’s that one time in your life that you, and only you, get to feel like a princess.

Unfortunately, not every girl has the luxury of having a quinceañera. Some girls’ families don’t have the finances to throw a huge party.

In Miami, a group of “fairy godmothers” organized a quinceañera for a homeless teen girl whose family recently emigrated from Mexico.

The girl, Adriana Palma, had moved with her family from Mexico to Miami in early 2020. But because of the pandemic, her father lost his job. Adriana, her parents, and her three younger brothers spent the next four months living in their SUV.

Relocating to another country is hard enough, but Adriana faced another challenge by being homeless, struggling to learn English, and chasing down random Wi-Fi signals in order to complete her homework assignments. It was a struggle, to say the least.

And to make matters worse, Adriana’s fifteenth birthday was coming up. Adrian’s parents told her that, since they were homeless, they wouldn’t be able to throw her a quinceañera. “We will be together as a family,” her mother, Itzel Palma, told her. “That will be my gift to you.”

Luckily, the Palma family had a group of guardian angels watching out for them. Being homeless wouldn’t prevent Adriana from having a quinceañera.

A charity called Miami Rescue Mission had already hooked up the Palmas with a small apartment for the family to get back on their feet. “Cover Girls”, a subgroup of the Miami Rescue Mission, dedicate their time to help women and children who are in tough circumstances.

When Lian Navarro, leader of the Cover Girls, found out about Adriana’s situation, she knew she had to help. Cuban-Amercian herself, Navarro knew how important quinceañeras are to young Latinas. She called up her group of volunteers and they got to work making Adriana’s dream come true.

The 60 “fairy godmothers” decided to throw Adriana the quinceañera of her dreams in a local Miami church. They settled on a theme: Paris.

The volunteers decorated the bare church in gold Eiffel towers, supplied pink macarons and French pastries, they topped off each table with a floral centerpiece. They gifted Adriana with every item on her wish list. Not to mention, Adriana was able to be dressed up in a frilly pink quinceañera dress. Her hair and makeup were professionally done. A professional photographer captured her special day.

“We want them to have these memories,” said Cover Girl volunteer, Tadia Silva, about children and teens who grow up homeless. “They have to believe they are worth all that because they are.”

After her beautiful quinceañera, Adriana appeared to know her true worth. At the end of the party, she gave her “fairy godmothers” personalized notes of thanks. “I felt like a princess,” she said.

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9-Year-Old Migrant Girl Drowns While Trying to Cross the Rio Grande in the U.S.

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9-Year-Old Migrant Girl Drowns While Trying to Cross the Rio Grande in the U.S.

Photo via Getty Images

On March 20th, U.S. Border Patrol agents found a 9-year-old migrant girl unresponsive along with her mother and sibling on an island in the Rio Grande.

U.S. Border Patrol agents attempted to resuscitate the family. The agents were able to revive the mother and her younger, 3-year-old child. The Border Patrol agents transferred the 9-year-old migrant girl to emergency medics in emergency medics in Eagle Pass, Texas, but she remained unresponsive.

In the end, the 9-year-old migrant girl died–the cause of death being drowning.

The mother of the two children was Guatemalan while the two children were born in Mexico.

The death of the 9-year-old migrant girl is notable because this is the first migrant child death recorded in this current migration surge. And experts worry that it won’t be the last.

And while this is the first child death, it is not the only migrant who has died trying to make it across the border. On Wednesday, a Cuban man drowned while trying to swim across the border between Tijuana and San Diego. He was the second migrant to drown in just a two-week period.

Why is this happening?

According to some reports, the reason so many migrants are heading towards the U.S. right now is “because President Trump is gone”. They believe they have a better chance of claiming asylum in the U.S.

Another factor to take into consideration is that a large number of these migrants are unaccompanied minors. According to migrant services volunteer Ruben Garcia, Title 42 is actually having the opposite effect of its intent. President Trump enacted Title 42 to prevent immigration during COVID-19 for “safety reasons”.

“Families that have been expelled multiple times that are traveling with children,” Garcia told PBS News Hour. “Some of them are making the decision to send their children in by themselves, because they have families someplace in the U.S., and they know their children will be released to them.”

Is there a “border crisis”?

That depends on who you ask. According to some experts, the numbers of migrants heading to the U.S./Mexico border aren’t out-of-the-ordinary considering the time of year and the fact that COVID-19 made traveling last year virtually impossible.

According to Tom Wong of the University of California at San Diego’s U.S. Immigration Policy Center, there is no “border crisis”. “This year looks like the usual seasonal increase, plus migrants who would have come last year but could not,” Wong says.

As the Washington Post explained: “What we’re seeing right now is a predictable seasonal shift. When the numbers drop again in June and July, policymakers may be tempted to claim that their deterrence policies succeeded.”

What is the Biden Administration planning on doing about it?

As of now, it is pretty evident that the Biden Administration has not been handling this migrant surge well, despite ample warning from experts. As of now, President Biden has put Vice President Harris in charge of handling the issues at the border.

As of now, the game plan is still very vague. But in the past, the Biden Administration has stated that they plan to fix the migrant surge at the source. That means providing more aid to Central America in order to prevent further corruption of elected officials.

They also want to put in place a plan that processes children and minors as refugees in their own countries before they travel to the U.S. The government had not tested these plans and they may take years to implement. Here’s to hoping that these changes will prevent a case like the death of the 9-year-old migrant girl.

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