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Mourners In Brazil And Colombia Remembered The Chapecoense Players Killed In A Plane Crash Last Year

Nelson Almeida / AFP /Getty Images

One year ago, Brazilian pro soccer club Chapecoense was flying to Medellín, Colombia to play the first leg of the Copa Sudamericana final against Colombia’s Atlético Nacional. Chapecoense, a small club that had moved up to Brazil’s top flight in 2004, was set to play two of its most important matches in club history. Unfortunately, tragedy struck before they landed in Colombia. Eighty-one people were aboard Chapecoense’s plane, which crashed just moments before reaching Medellín. Seventy-five people died, including athletes, coaches, journalists, and crew. Here’s how those lost in this tragedy were remembered one year later.

Soccer players and friends of those lost in the plane took time to reflect.

“What happened to Chapecoense was something that’s very hard to talk about,” said Neymar, who lost friends in the accident. “It was a tragic accident that involved soccer players, but also their families.”

In La Unión, Colombia, the closest city to the crash site, people gathered to remember those who died.

According to El Colombiano, military personnel and mourners took over the main square of La Unión to pay tribute to the athletes killed that day. A moment of silence was observed out of respect for the victims.

Officials unveiled a commemorative plaque in the city square honoring the dead.

Displayed on the plaque are the names of the victims and survivors. The names are grouped together to show the players, journalists, flight crew, and the other passengers on the plane.

There is a time capsule that officials in La Unión are giving to the city of Chapecó. Atlético Nacional players and fans filled the capsule with notes.

The time capsule will be sealed for 40 years, according to El Colombiano. The capsule will make its way to Chapecó after passing through the Atanasio Girardot stadium.

Residents of Chapecó gathered at the town’s stadium just after midnight on Nov. 29 to mark the time the plane crashed.

CREDIT: AFP news agency / YouTube

“It is best to choose reflection and seek peace,” a club spokesperson said in a statement, according to The News and Observer. “Our eternal champions deserve all the tributes, but on this day we need to be respectful with those that remain and with the good memories that need to be eternal.”

Fans filled the stadium with chants for the team they held close to their hearts.

CREDIT: Al Jazeera English / YouTube

They even took to the streets to march in remembrance of those lost.

CREDIT: Al Jazeera English / YouTube

The team that meant so much to so many might be gone but they are definitely not forgotten.


READ: Brazilian Soccer Team’s Cinderella Story Cut Short By Tragic Plane Crash

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Latino Man Wins $20,000 Settlement After He Was Wrongfully Detained By ICE

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Latino Man Wins $20,000 Settlement After He Was Wrongfully Detained By ICE

John Moore / Getty

Yesterday, a U.S. citizen won a $20,000 settlement because immigration officials mistook him for being undocumented and detained him for three days in 2016.

The American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) represented Sergio Carrillo, a landscaper living in Rialto, Calif., in a lawsuit against the United States of America with claims that U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) were watching him days before his detainment at a Home Depot last summer. So why did ICE think he was undocumented even though Carrillo said he was a U.S. citizen? It’s not clear.

This is every immigrant’s nightmare, even if they have citizenship,” attorney Jennie Pasquarella, the ACLU of California’s director of immigrants’ rights, said in a press release statement. “Sergio was arrested and put behind bars because of the absence of any information on him in their databases, which are known to be full of errors.”

According to The Riverside Press-Enterprise, someone called Carrillo as he was walking into the Home Depot. The caller wanted to know Carrillo’s whereabouts, which prompted Carillo to ask who was calling. The person on the other end hung up and Carrillo received a text that asked the same question.

As he exited the store, police and immigration officials detained him.

When I heard Sergio’s story, I was shocked,” said Tyler Anthony, an associate at Perkins Coie representing Carrillo along with the ACLU. “Sergio is a U.S. citizen and ICE had no evidence to think otherwise. It’s saddening to think that anyone is potentially in danger of such treatment, and his story is a reminder that we need to hold the government accountable. I am glad that we were able to do so in Sergio’s case.”

Cleary ICE knew they were in the wrong because they settled this matter out of court.

“I think it’s particularly alarming that they never took any steps to investigate his citizenship,” attorney Jennie Pasquarella, the ACLU of California’s director of immigrants’ rights, told The Press-Enterprise. “He claimed he was a citizen over, and over, and over again and nobody took him seriously.”

H/T: Rialto landscaper, a U.S. citizen, to get $20,000 after ICE agents arrested, detained him

READ: 800 Undocumented Workers Lost Their Jobs At A Chicago Bakery After Immigration Raid

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