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If You Need Inspiration, Read And Remember These Uplifting And Powerful Quotes By Cesar Chavez

Although Cesar Chávez passed away on April 23, 1993, he is still remembered till this day for his work as a union leader and activist in the 1960s.

Here are 23 powerful Cesar Chávez Quotes that highlight the huge motivation he had for social change, along with the significance he placed on selflessness and non-violent protest.

These first five quotes show the level to which Chávez pushed for social change.

1.

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“Social change is permanent.”

2.

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“Students are a valuable part of any revolution.”

3.

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“Persistence is necessary to achieve a dream.”

4.

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“We have to be able to draw strength from unexpected places.”

5.

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“The only way to go is forward.”

The following six quotes by Chávez highlight the importance he placed on unity and collaboration.

6.

“Action is the most important response.”

7.

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“Collaboration can be born from a common need.”

8.

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“Unity is unconquerable.”

9.

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“Never fear asking for help.”

10. ✊? ✊? ✊?

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11.

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“An organization should never lose purpose.”

As seen in the next five quotes, Chávez was also huge on helping other communities outside of your own, even if the issues did not affect you or your family directly.

12.

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“Intersectionality is key to winning any fight.”

13.

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It is crucial to help others in need.

14.

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15. Love is greater than hate.

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“All cultures can exist together.”

16.

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“History will always remember the one who cared for the poor.”

The following three quotes focus particularly on Chavez’s fight for farmworker’s rights, which is what he is highly recognized for.

17.

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“Why do those that provide for us have nothing for themselves?”

18.

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“Never lose sight of what the fight is for.”

19. ?? ?? ??

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Last but not least, here are three final quotes by Chávez that highlight the importance he placed on his strategy of non-violent protest.

20.

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“Non-violence takes more diligence.”

21.

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“Never equate non-violence with inaction.”

22.

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“Non-violence starts with shedding humiliating tasks.”

Which quote by Cesar Chávez inspires you the most?


READ: Here’s How People Are Celebrating Cesar Chavez 25 Years After His Death

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Joe Biden Campaign Taps César Chavez’s Granddaughter To Run Latino Outreach

Things That Matter

Joe Biden Campaign Taps César Chavez’s Granddaughter To Run Latino Outreach

joebiden / Instagram

Presumptive Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden has tapped Julie Chávez Rodriguez to head up his campaign’s Latino outreach attempts. Latinos are a key voting demographic in the 2020 elections and both parties are fighting for the important vote.

Former Vice President Joe Biden is expanding his campaign’s Latino outreach with a key hire.

The Biden campaign’s hire is an investment into the Latino vote the campaign hopes will pay off. Julie Chávez Rodriguez is the granddaughter of important civil rights figure César Chávez. César was one of the leaders of the Farmworkers Movement fighting for fair pay and working conditions for farmworkers. The movement began in California where undocumented people were being exploited on farms across the state.

Some people are very excited to see Julie work on the Biden campaign.

The Biden campaign has a lot of work to do to secure the Latino vote. A Latinos Decision poll from April showed that Latinos leaned towards his candidacy with 59 percent of the vote. Meanwhile, 22 percent of Latinos are ready to support President Donald Trump in 2020.

Part of Biden’s problem with the Latino vote stems from his time in the Obama administration. The immigration record for the Obama administration is something that haunts President Barack Obama and Biden. More people were deported under President Obama’s administration than any administration in history.

Chávez Rodriguez might serve as a bridge into the Latino vote.

Biden was running a low-budget campaign at the beginnings of the race and the lack of outreach shows. Biden trailed Sanders with young Latino voters in Texas and California by healthy margins. The exit polling from those states on primary night illustrated the clear lack of enthusiasm for Biden in the Latino community.

According to a report from Reuters, Puerto Ricans on the mainland want more from Biden. The community, who have been devastated by hurricanes, earthquakes, financial scandals, and, now, a health pandemic. The report shows that the Puerto Rican people want a stronger and bolder plan to fight for the island and the Americans living there.

Chávez Rodriguez worked for the Senator Kamala Harris campaign so she has experiencing work a presidential campaign.

Before serving as Sen. Harris’s co-national political director, Chávez Rodriguez also served as Sen. Harris’s California state director. Chávez Rodriguez also spent time working with the Obama administration before working for Sen. Harris. Chávez Rodriguez worked with the Obama administration working on engagement with LGBTQ, Latino, veteran, youth, education, labor, and progressive leaders.

Chávez Rodriguez joins former Latino Victory Funds President Cristóbal Alex who currently serves as senior advisor for issues impacting Latino voters. Chávez Rodriguez will also be joined on the campaign by Representative Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez. AOC is part of a unity task force put together by the Biden campaign to bring Senator Bernie Sanders supporters into the campaign.

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A Documentary Is Shedding Light On The Labor Organizer Who Fought For Farmworkers Before Dolores Huerta

Entertainment

A Documentary Is Shedding Light On The Labor Organizer Who Fought For Farmworkers Before Dolores Huerta

George Ballis / Take Stock

Dolores Huerta and Cesar Chavez are often considered the leaders in the farmworkers rights movement. The two have done a lot to better the lives of those working in the fields, but a new documentary is highlighting a forgotten hero in the farmworkers rights movement. “Adios Amor” is highlighting the work of Maria Moreno, who fought for their rights before Huerta and Chavez continued her work.

Before Cesar Chavez and Dolores Huerta, there was Maria Moreno, the first female farmworker to lead a union.

Credit: George Ballis / Take Stock

 Adiós Amor—The Search for Maria Moreno, is a feature film that examines the life and death of the obscure labor leader. Moreno was a migrant mother who sacrificed everything but her twelve kids in the pursuit of justice for farmworkers. During the late ’50s and ’60s, Moreno’s work led poor agricultural workers into a movement that would later capture the heart of the nation. 

The discovery of forgotten photographs taken more than fifty years ago sparked the search for an unsung hero. A migrant mother haunted by a personal tragedy who rolled up her sleeves, collected signatures, and electrified audiences with her gift for public speaking for a cause she believed in.

Moreno was the first female farmworker in America to be hired as a union organizer. She was elected by her fellow Mexican American, Filipino, Black and Okie farmworkers to represent them. Her charisma attracted crowds, but it also got her into trouble with her labor bosses who fired her for being so outspoken. 

The film’s director and producer Laurie Coyle found photos of Moreno tucked away in an archive.

Credit: George Ballis / Take Stock

Were it not for the Maverick photographers and journalists who captured Maria’s legacy, her story might have been lost. Coyle has said that the idea for the project began after she found the images captured by late farmworker photographer George Ballis. The photos depict Moreno speaking in front of crowds and meeting with workers in the fields of California, racing to events with her children and husband.

“She had this piercing gaze and always seemed to be surrounded by children,” Coyle told Shoot Online. “I couldn’t help but be captivated.”

Coyle began researching about Moreno. But the whereabouts of the activist later in life remains a mystery. The search for Moreno guides the documentary, where characters fade in and out like ghosts. From California’s Great Central Valley to the Arizona desert and U.S.-Mexico border, the journey tells Moreno’s story with passion and humor. The director soon discovered radio journalist Ernest Lowe, who had followed Moreno during her days as a union leader and had also been enchanted by her charisma. 

Moreno and her family were traveling farmworkers following the crops.

Credit: George Ballis / Take Stock

Born to a Mexican immigrant father and Mescalero Apache mother, in Karnes City, Texas; Moreno and her family were nomadic farmworkers for years. Following the crops, their travels took them to Utah, California, Arizona, and Texas. 

In April 1958, Moreno started her union activism following a flood that pushed many workers into starvation. Coyle found that one of her sons went blind temporarily due to extreme hunger. “How do you think that I feel … seeing my son blind only because we don’t got nothing to eat?” Moreno said in one passionate speech. “(Meanwhile), some other tables are full and wasting food.”

In a time of unprecedented abundance, farmworkers lived in dire poverty, and Maria Moreno set out to change that.

Credit: George Ballis / Take Stock

A deeply human drama is brought to the viewers’ attention, Mexican-American farmworkers living in dire poverty at a time of unprecedented abundance. An abundance sustained by impoverished peoples’ faith, family values, and working-class culture. 

Adios Amor – The Search for Maria Moreno pays tribute to the people whose hard work feeds the nation, and celebrates the courageous woman who told their story to the world.

She gained support from Oklahoma migrants, Filipino American workers, and Latino pickers, and was active in the Agricultural Workers Organizing Committee, a union that was sponsored by the AFL-CIO.

“It was so unusual for a woman like her back then to be in this position,” Coyle told Shoot Online. “The first time I understood that she was somebody different was when she went to (University of California,) Berkeley,” Martha Moreno Dominguez, her daughter, said in the film. “I realized who my mother really was … I said, wow, you know. Here’s my mother, a second-grade education doing this.”

Eventually, Moreno was forced out of the union and left California to practice her faith.

Credit: George Ballis / Take Stock

Eventually, in 1962, Moreno was forced out of the fight due to jealousy and disagreements within the union. Documents show an AFL-CIO official accused her of misspending and she was forced to step down from leadership.

“She wasn’t afraid to say whatever she had to say,” Gilbert Padilla, co-founder for the United Farm Workers, told Shoot Online. “I assume that’s why they got rid of her.”

Coyle’s research found that when Cesar Chavez began to form his own farmworkers union, he purposely kept Moreno out of it, seeing her as a “big mouth”, and a possible rival.

Moreno’s children say she left California for a remote part of the Arizona desert, 100 miles west of Phoenix, where she asked God for guidance. Later in her life, Moreno became a Pentecostal minister along the US-Mexico border in San Luis, Arizona. She sought to transform society one soul at a time, instead of focusing on systemic change. Maria Moreno died in 1989, largely forgotten.

Watch the trailer below.

The film is set to premiere Friday, September 27 on most PBS stations.

READ: Dolores Huerta The Latina Freedom Fighter Who Taught Us ‘Sí Se Puede’ Has Been Arrested Over 20 Times

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