Things That Matter

Capitol Rioter Drops Request To Travel To Peru After Being Called A Major Flight Risk

You would think that those were involved in the attack on the U.S. Capitol, would have known that there would be consequences to their actions. Consequences like possible jail time, probation, or even a ban on their travel, but apparently not.

A second person charged in the attack on the capitol is now asking a federal judge for permission to leave the country – this time to Peru for his wedding.

A man charged in the U.S. Capitol riot filed a request to travel to Peru.

Troy Williams has been charged with several counts related to the attack on the U.S. Capitol on January 6. And although he faces serious consequences for his actions, he’s hoping a federal judge will grant him permission to travel to Peru to marry his fiancée.

Williams told the court in his filing on Tuesday that his fiancé currently lives in Peru and asked for permission to travel there to get married. 

When interviewed by the FBI, Williams admitted to attending the Stop the Steal rally on January 6 and entering the Capitol, though he said he had “no intentions of entering the Capitol building until everyone went inside,” and only entered due to “herd mentality.”

Williams is not the first charged rioter who has asked to leave the country. On February 5, a federal judge granted Jenny Cudd’s request to travel to Mexico for an already planned work-bonding retreat. Directly after she breached the Capitol, Cudd told a local news outlet that she would “do it again”.

Cudd was granted permission to leave the country by Judge Trevor McFadden, a Trump-appointed judge in the US District Court for the District of Columbia.

Original Story Published on February 4, 2021:

In what can only be described as peak white privilege, a woman that was involved in the attack on the U.S. Capitol has asked for permission to go on vacation in Mexico. Not only did she participate in an attempted coup against the United States, but we’re also in the middle of a pandemic that is devastating Mexican communities.

A suspect in the attack on the U.S. Capitol has asked for permission to vacation in Mexico.

Jenny Cudd, a Texas flower shop owner and unsuccessful mayoral candidate from Midland, wrote to a federal judge on Monday asking for permission to visit Mexico’s Riviera Maya (near Cancun), a four-day “bonding retreat” with her employees.

“Prior to the alleged offense at issue, Ms. Cudd planned and prepaid for a weekend retreat with her employees for the dates of February 18 through February 21, 2021, in Riviera Maya, Mexico,” her attorneys wrote. “This is a work-related bonding retreat for employees and their spouses.” 

“Ms. Cudd has no criminal history and is a United States citizen,” Cudd’s attorneys wrote, adding that she is “a small business owner in Midland, Texas and an established member of her community.

USA Today reported Tuesday that the request had been approved, but issued a correction Wednesday saying the federal magistrate had not given her permission for the Feb. 18-21 “work-related bonding retreat” to Riviera Maya with fellow employees and their spouses.

Cudd’s next hearing is scheduled for Thursday, according to the Midland Reporter-Telegram. A federal judge revoked her travel privileges outside the continental U.S. last month and ordered her not to travel to Washington unless it’s related to her case. If convicted on both charges, Cudd reportedly faces up to 18 months in prison and a $100,000 fine.

So, she storms the U.S. Capitol to overthrow democracy and wants a trip to Mexico in return?

Cudd, 36, is facing two misdemeanor charges in the Capitol siege: entering a restricted building and disorderly conduct. She posted a 25-minute Facebook video detailing her actions that day, saying she and other Donald Trump supporters decided to “storm the Capitol” after alleging that then-Vice President Mike Pence “betrayed” her and other “patriots” there.

Cudd claimed she and others didn’t “vandalize anything,” but acknowledged being part of a group that broke into House Speaker Nancy Pelosi’s office. She later denied all wrongdoing to a Texas news station.

“I did not break any laws,” Cudd told KWES last month. “I went inside the Capitol completely legally and I did not do anything to hurt anybody or destroy any property.”

And she claims that she would do it again! “So what they’re trying to do is cancel me because I stood up for what it is that I believed in,” Cudd told KWES. “And I can tell you this – and I’ve told everybody this – I would do it again in a heartbeat.”

Not to mention, the world is still in the midst of a worldwide pandemic and Mexico is no different.

As if storming the capitol wasn’t enough, Cudd also seems to forget (or simply not care) that the world is still battling the Coronavirus pandemic. Mexico has been hit particularly hard and although the country remains open to tourism, local hospitals are seeing record-breaking occupancy.

So the call remains for everyone to stay at home, including those who attempted a coup against the U.S.

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Peruvian Rocker Diana Flores Goes Disco With New Single “Desaparecer”

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Peruvian Rocker Diana Flores Goes Disco With New Single “Desaparecer”

ALMENDRA FERRER

Peruvian indie rocker Diana Flores is marking a new phase in her career with “Desaparecer.” The former Baby Steps frontwoman has gone solo with the disco-influenced single.

Diana was originally a rocker in the band Baby Steps.

Flores is most known as the frontwoman of bands like Kasama and Baby Steps in Peru. Both bands were part of the country’s indie rock wave. In Baby Steps, the Lima native shredded on the guitar. Baby Steps’ music was equally raucous and ethereal like in “Molly.”

The COVID-19 quarantine inspired Diana to push herself as a solo artist.

Antonella Morelli

While in quarantine during the COVID-19 pandemic, Flores discovered that she could make music on her own. She also pushed herself to “step out of [her] comfort zone” and tackle new sounds. Flores’ debut solo single “Desaparecer” was produced by Marshall Did It Again, who previously worked with Lil Mosey and Jowell of Jowell y Randy.

“2020 turned out to be one of my most creative years, not just in music, but in general,” Flores said in a statement. “Spending time with myself without feeling external pressure and evaluating my strengths have made this project off to the best start. Not only do I feel safe with the result of ‘Desaparecer’ but happy to finally be able to experiment with other genres.”

“Desaparecer” is a disco-pop dream en español.

After disco-pop gripped the globe last year thanks to The Weeknd and Dua Lipa, Flores followed their lead with “Desaparecer.” In the sleek and sexy track, she sings about getting lost with a lover on the dance floor. Her rock star edge is still intact with an incredible guitar solo. The dazzling “Desaparecer” hopefully leads to more disco escapism that we desperately need in Spanish.

Flores also noted that the song was her way of coping with last year’s political strife in Peru. Massive protests happened following the removal of President Martín Vizcarra. The shocking move was seen as a coup by many. Two protesters were killed in a clash in November and Vizcarra’s replacement Manuel Merino resigned after five days in office.

“‘Desaparecer’ was born after a very strong anxiety crisis due to everything that was happening last year in the country,” Flores added.

UPDATE: The music video is here.

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Read: Dominican Duo Martox is Keeping Latin Alternative Music Alive with “Mente”

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Peruvian Woman Wins Battle Over Right To Die Request

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Peruvian Woman Wins Battle Over Right To Die Request

ANGELA PONCE/ Getty Images

No doubt about it, women have struggled more than anyone to convince the world that the right to make decisions about their bodies is theirs. Ana Estrada, a woman currently confined to her bed, knows this truth. After spending five years of attempting to convince Peruvian officials that she has what’s best for herself in mind, she has finally made a breakthrough.

Recently, Estrada was able to convince Peruvian officials to make a historic decision, regarding her own assisted death.

Euthanasia is largely illegal in the Roman Catholic country of Peru, but Estrada has been granted an exception.

Psychologist Ana Estrada, who has suffered from incurable and progressive polio since the age of 12, poses for pictures at her house in Lima, on February 15, 2020. – A Peruvian court on February 25, 2021 ordered the government to respect the wishes of Estrada to be allowed to die, a rare allowance for euthanasia in largely Catholic Latin America. (Photo by Angela PONCE / AFP) (Photo by ANGELA PONCE/AFP via Getty Images)

Euthanasia is a practice that is illegal in many countries across the globe including Peru where access to abortion and same-sex marriage are also banned. Still, Estrada made a decision for herself to commit to a five-year legal battle after she decided to end her own life “when the time comes.”

Recently, Peru’s government ruled not to appeal a court ruling which recognized her right to “a dignified death.”

“It is an individual case, but I hope it serves as a precedent,” Estrada, 44, explained to Reuters in a recent interview. “I think it is an achievement not only of mine, not only of my cause but also an achievement of law and justice in Peru.”

Estrada, who is a psychologist, has lived with the rare disease called polymyositis for three decades.

The painful disease progressively attacks her muscles and has resulted in her need to breathe with a respirator most of the time. According to NBC, a court ruling from last week granted that state health insurer EsSalud to provide “all conditions” needed for Estrada’s euthanasia. The court also ruled that the event must occur within 10 business days of the date that she decides to end her life. According to NBC, “EsSalud said a statement it would comply with the ruling and form medical commissions to develop a protocol for such cases. The court ruling also cleared anyone assisting Estrada in her death from facing charges, although local law still prohibits anyone from helping people to die.”

Estrada is the author of the blog “Ana seeks dignified death” which she began writing in 2016. In an interview with Reuters, she explained that she made the decision to end her life when she realized she was no longer able to write.

“My body is failing, but my mind and my spirit are happy,” she explained. “I want the last moment of my life to continue like this, in freedom, with peace, tranquility, and autonomy. I want to be remembered like that.”

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