Things That Matter

California Man Arrested With Drugs And Guns While Keeping A Person Hostage And Suspected Of Murder

The California man accused of murdering Iraq veteran Adrian Bonar was arrested in his home Monday night, during a SWAT raid that yielded several guns, over four pounds of fentanyl and another adult male who “had been kidnapped and was being held against his will,” according to a statement by the Anaheim Police Department. Antonio Silva, 27, is suspected of murdering Army Veteran Adrian Bonar, whose body was found wrapped in a tarp in the trunk of an abandoned Lexus on October 17th off Santa Ana Canyon Road west of Gypsum Canyon. Due to the nature of the crime, the Anaheim Police Department involved a SWAT team to partake in the search warrant of Silva’s home in the 2500 block of Bristol Street in Santa Ana, and for good reason. The search warrant yielded two rifles, two handguns and over four pounds of fentanyl.

Amazingly, we encountered an adult male who had been kidnapped and was being held against his will at Silva’s home,” Anaheim Police said in a statement. “We were able to rescue that victim and likely prevented another murder.”

Antonio Silva has been booked for murder, kidnapping, and false imprisonment along with drug and weapons charges

CREDIT: ANAHEIM POLICE DEPARTMENT / FACEBOOK

Silva reportedly resisted arrest, and police fired 40mm sponge rounds, which are sponge-tipped bullets designed to injure, rather than kill. The investigation remains open and ongoing so the police are not revealing any information about the relationship between Silva, Bonar and the kidnapping victim, who has not been named. Police believe that the kidnapping victim was being held for ransom in Silva’s home for several days. He was sent to the hospital, treated, and kept overnight, but released the following morning.

“Our homicide detectives and virtually every investigative unit in the Anaheim Police Department have been working tirelessly for the past four weeks on this case,” APD Public Information Officer Sgt. Daron Wyatt told Behind the Badge. “(It was) outstanding work from our investigators. They worked it from the ground up.”

Adrian Bonar’s body was found when Anaheim Police began towing the Lexus his body was hidden in.

CREDIT: ANAHEIM POLICE DEPARTMENT / FACEBOOK

The tow truck driver thought something was unusual about the car. Bonar was the son of millionaire restaurant owner Dr. Brian Bonar. He was born in Scotland, but later moved to San Diego and signed up to be of service. “Regardless of what Adrian may have been involved in, he was a victim of this crime,” Wyatt said. “He was an honorably discharged veteran of the U.S. Army who saw combat in Iraq, and nobody deserves to die in this fashion or be a victim of a murder no matter what they’ve done.”

Adrian Bonar was an alumni brother of mine,” Mark J. Sellinger commented on the Anaheim Police Department’s Facebook post. “He and I, many years removed, attended the same military academy. I have shared the news of the arrest of the suspect in his killing with my academy brothers. On behalf of our brotherhood, we thank the Anaheim Police and all the other agencies who worked to arrest this alleged killer so he can face justice.”

Bonar is survived by his wife, Jackie Franklin, and daughter, Piper.

CREDIT: ANAHEIM POLICE DEPARTMENT / ADRIAN BONAR / FACEBOOK

In a Facebook tribute last month, Bonar’s sister, Pauline Gourdie, called his murderer “evil scum.” “My wee brother, my twin 14 years apart. How I loved you and I know you loved me back,” she wrote. “My heart is breaking, yet bursting with pride that you were my brother. It’s clear you were not only loved by your family but by so many whose life you touched. You were taken too soon but by gawd did you live it…So proud of all that you achieved in your life, cut short by evil scum. May you soar with the eagles in heaven while they squawk in the sewers of hell! Until we meet again. Sleep tight lil bro. Your heartbroken sis, P.”

Silva’s arrest at this exact moment has certainly saved at least one life.

CREDIT: ANAHEIM POLICE DEPARTMENT / FACEBOOK

“It is as legitimate of a kidnapping as you could get,” Sergeant Shane Carringer, a spokesperson for Anaheim Police Department, told Oxygen.com. “He was absolutely confined and unable to leave the location. He was there against his will. His road to recovery, not only physically, but also mentally and emotionally, will be pretty extraordinary… We absolutely prevented another murder,” he told the outlet. 

Police are asking anyone with information about this case to call the Anaheim PD hotline at 714-321-3669.

READ: Man Posts Snapchat Photo Of Murdered Victim Saying “I don’t know what to do”

After Tekashi69 Cooperated With Authorities Against His Gang He Now Fears Spending Time In Prison

Entertainment

After Tekashi69 Cooperated With Authorities Against His Gang He Now Fears Spending Time In Prison

6ix9ine / Instagram

Rapper Tekashi69 may have been sentenced to two years in prison last month, but he’s already petitioned the judge presiding over his case to serve the remainder of his sentence in home confinement for fear of his life. Tekashi, born Daniel Hernandez, was initially facing 37 years in prison, for firearms, racketeering, shootings, and robbery charges. His cooperation in taking down his own gang, the Nine Trey Gangsta Bloods, reduced his prison sentence to two years. However, this means that Hernandez was transferred from a federal jail to a private prison alongside “various members of the Bloods,” according to Hernandez’s attorney, Lance Lazzaro, in a motion to modify Hernandez’s prison sentence. The term “snitches get stitches” is gang culture canon for a reason and Hernandez’s cooperation ensured the conviction of two Nine Trey gang members, a Bloods gang.

Now, Lazzaro is trying to get Hernandez out of prison by emphasizing that “Hernandez’s safety is still, and will continue to be for the foreseeable future, seriously at risk.”

Daniel Hernandez, a.k.a. Tekashi69, hoped that his cooperation would warrant his immediate release from custody after pleading guilty to his charges.

CREDIT: 6IX9INE / INSTAGRAM

Judge Paul A. Engelmayer spoke directly to Hernandez in the courtroom last month when he told him, “Your conduct was too violent, too sustained, too destructive, too selfish, and too reckless with respect to public safety to make a sentence of 13 months at all reasonable,” according to The New York Times. Hernandez pleaded guilty to several shootings and robberies and appeared genuinely remorseful at his hearing. At one point, one of his victims testified about her experience of being shot by Hernandez. “I know I was wrong,” he reportedly said through tears. “I was weak. I was easily influenced. I can’t believe that was me. Again, your honor, there is no apology good enough.”

When Hernandez read his statement to the court, he spotted the father he hadn’t seen in over a decade in the crowd.

CREDIT: 6IX9INE / INSTAGRAM

Hernandez, 23, was giving his measured statement to the court when he visibly started to get emotional. Hernandez told Judge Engelmayer that he just noticed his biological father, who abandoned his family when Hernandez was in third grade, in the audience. The man confirmed and requested that he take the podium but Engelmayer told him that he “squandered” that right “many, many years ago.” 

The man and performer we knew as Tekashi69 has seemed to evolve during his court proceedings. Up until his arrest, Hernandez routinely rapped about gang life and his disdain for the law. Just one day after his arrest, however, he started “snitching” to the federal government on the Bloods.

The judge has described his cooperation as “game-changing” and “brave,” but it also makes him a serious target.

CREDIT: @ALMIGHTYJOKA / TWITTER

“As the court is well aware, Rolland Martin, a co-conspirator convicted in Hernandez’s case, was almost killed in a Bureau of Prisons facility, not for cooperating with the government, but for merely renouncing his membership in the gang,” Lazzaro told the court. Hernandez has not only renounced the gang but has “provided the government with critical insight into the structure and organization of Nine Trey” prosecutors stated in a court document meant to seek leniency in his sentencing. 

“Your cooperation was impressive. It was game-changing. It was complete and it was brave,” Judge Engelmayer told Hernandez during his sentencing, saying his cooperation “brought out the best in you, and you should be proud of yourself for it.” Since the government understands that Hernandez’s cooperation necessitates a lifetime of looking over their shoulders, his sentence has been reduced. With is safety in mind, he was sent to a private facility meant to provide extra security from Blood members. That very security measure may prove to be an obstacle in granting him early release into home confinement.

Now, Hernandez is seeking early release or to be transferred to a community correctional facility (CCC).

Credit: @ACAMBACANI / TWITTER

If his safety wasn’t a consideration, Hernandez would have been committed to the custody of the Bureau of Prisons until he was eligible for early release or a CCC. However, his cooperation with the government has imposed such a danger on his life, the Court sentenced him to a private facility without as much danger. Still, Lazzaro says that such accommodation has robbed him of the ability for an early release.

“Given the sensitive nature of his testimony as a government witness and his celebrity status, my client will have to take extreme measures for both the security of himself and his family for quite possibly the rest of their lives,” Lazzaro said, implying that a life sentence from a violent gang has already been assigned to Hernandez. 

Hernandez has declined the government’s offer of being placed in witness protection and says he wants to continue making music. In fact, just weeks before his trial, he signed a $10 million record deal. Today, he says he’s thinking of the children who have looked up to him to become an example of someone who can turn their life around.

READ: Tekashi69’s Undocumented Driver Cooperated With Federal Authorities To Avoid Being Deported

A Jury Has Finally Been Selected For The Harvey Weinstein Rape Trial And Gigi Hadid Is Out

Entertainment

A Jury Has Finally Been Selected For The Harvey Weinstein Rape Trial And Gigi Hadid Is Out

@Current_Knewz / Twitter

After more than 100 women accused him of varying degrees of sexual assault, Harvey Weinstein’s rape trial is now underway. The jury selection process began almost two weeks ago in New York State Supreme Court, where a diverse pool of prospective jurors gathered, ready for the opportunity to participate in one of the most intense legal battles of the #MeToo movement. However, the process of selecting an impartial jury proved difficult—while 120 prospective jurors showed up that first day, many people admitted an inability to remain unbiased, which ultimately disqualified them from participating in the trial. This pattern continued the following day, when 47 of the additional 120 prospective jurors were dismissed for the same reason.

This past week, one of the people dismissed was supermodel Gigi Hadid. Hadid claimed that she could be fair and impartial if selected as a juror, but her involvement in the Hollywood social scene gave Judge James Burke pause.

Credit: Jim Haffrey / Associated Press

According to a pool reporter inside the Manhattan courtroom, Burke read a list of potential witnesses, asking the potential jurors to speak up if they knew anyone on the list. Hadid raised her hand and said, “I have met Salma Hayek.” She also affirmed that she had met Weinstein before.

“I think I’m still able to keep an open mind on the facts,” she said. But Burke was not convinced, and dismissed her from the selection pool.

Although Weinstein has been accused of harassing scores of women, the trial addresses just five charges from two accusers. The charges include predatory sexual assault, rape, and a criminal sexual act in the first degree. If convicted, he could spend the rest of his life in prison. Yet Weinstein has pleaded not guilty to all of the charges, and he maintains that all of the sexual encounters in question were consensual.

The trial is estimated to last until March, with two weeks of jury selection and eight weeks of arguments and testimony—all before actual deliberations are due to start.

Credit: Associated Press / Mark Lennihan

According to Weinstein’s attorney, Donna Rotunno, one of the major challenges with securing a jury was finding people who are able to commit to such an extensive trial. Weinstein’s defense team has also expressed concern with a perceived inability to locate impartial jurors in New York City—as a metropolitan area heavily tuned in to the media, Weinstein’s team feared that most prospective jurors have been following the case and forming opinions about Weinstein’s misconduct since it was first brought to light in 2017. According to CNN, Weinstein’s team made multiple attempts to move the trial to different cities in New York, where the likelihood of locating unbiased jurors might be higher.

On January 16, seven jurors—four men and three women—were seated. But that day, prosecutors accused Weinstein’s team of deliberately eliminating young white women from the pool of prospective jurors, as Weinstein’s lawyers had used half of their peremptory challenges to excuse prospective white women jurors who were not dismissed for bias or previously deemed unfit by prosecutors.

Why is this important, you may ask? Well, first of all, it’s illegal to use peremptory challenges to eliminate potential jurors on the basis of sex, race, ethnicity or religion.

Second of all, while lead prosecutor Joan Illuzi did not clarify why a lack of white women jurors would be problematic for the prosecution, legal experts said that the defense seemed to assume that jurors of this demographic were especially likely to sympathize with Weinstein’s accusers. So, the idea is that the defense tried to limit jurors of this kind in a strategic attempt to prevent even subconscious opposition to Weinstein during the trial.

Yet defense lawyers dismissed this accusation, citing specific reasons for rejecting each individual white woman and claiming that the remaining white female jurors’ responses to a questionnaire ultimately deemed them unfit to sit on the jury.

Rotunno said that the responses to the questionnaire that aimed to determine whether prospective jurors had experienced sexual assault (or knew someone who had) ultimately determined who would be a viable, unbiased candidate for jury selection, and that the defense’s resistance to seating certain individuals “had nothing to do with race or sex.” But due to the high number of women—regardless of race—who have experienced sexual violence, this stipulation largely diminished the number of women deemed fit for consideration at all. On the first day of jury selection alone, roughly 30% of the 120 prospective jurors stepped down for bias linked to personal experiences of sexual assault.

Ultimately, the final 12-person jury is comprised of six white men, one black man, two white women, and three black women. The alternate jurors, who will only serve if one of the first 12 jurors must withdraw, include a white man, a Latina woman and a black woman.