Things That Matter

It’s Been Six Months And Brazil’s President Is On A Tear Stripping Rights Away From Every Vulnerable Community

President Bolsonaro, who has been referred to as “Brazil’s Trump” or “Tropical Trump,” has just enjoyed the first six months of his presidency. While his 27 years in Congress was marked by only two bills that became law, Bolsonaro is making irreversible changes as President. The country remains divided in opinion, with some Bolsonaro supporters already regretting their vote, and others experiencing the benefits of his inauguration.

Bolsonaro ran on a platform as anti-corruption and pro-gun as a measure to reduce crime and gang violence in the country. He’s also emphasized a return to “family values,” which includes far-right beliefs like homosexuality as unnatural, and the nuclear working-father stay-at-home mother family archetype. Here’s what all that talk has looked like in real life.

In his first hours after his inauguration, Bolsonaro removed LGBTQ+ rights from its human rights ministry scope.

@arabellamartuni / Twitter

He also attempted to remove homosexuality from textbooks. In the past, Bolsonaro has said that he’d prefer his son dead rather than gay. Bolsonaro also had to cancel a trip to New York after American protest due to his anti-LGBTQ+ policies.

Just recently, after Brazil’s Supreme Court ruled that LGBTQ+ people deserve protection from discrimination, Bolsonaro warned against Brazil becoming “known as a gay tourism paradise.” Needless to say, Pride festivals were even bigger this year.

In a play against crime, Bolsonaro eased restrictions on gun ownership.

@JComm_NewsFeeds / Twitter

The executive order makes it easier for a person to import guns and raises the cap on the amount of ammunition a single person can buy in a year… by a lot. Instead of 50 cartridges of ammunition allowed per year, a single Brazilian can purchase 5,000 cartridges per year.

His administration has introduced a bill that would protect police if they kill a suspect out of fear or “intense emotion.”

@KenRoth / Twitter

President Bolsonaro’s Justice Minister, Sérgio Moro, is responsible for the introduction of said bill. If an officer cites “excusable fear, surprise or intense emotion,” the officer won’t be held accountable for the death of the alleged suspect. It essentially shields abusive officers from consequence and leaves citizens more vulnerable to the emotionality of officers.

Over 13 million Brazilians remain unemployed.

@RekordNewspaper / Twitter

This photograph is of Brazilians standing in line outside an employment center in Rio de Janeiro. When asked, those in line say they’re ready to accept any job.

Bolsonaro ran a campaign that focused so heavily on pension reform to ease Brazil’s debt that little focus has been left for the growing unemployment crisis.

Bolsonaro has followed through on his promise to strengthen ties with the U.S. and Israel.

@BrazilianReport / Twitter

These two have gotten along great. No democratic President of Brazil has been so pro-US as Bolsonaro. In March, Bolsonaro traveled to Washington to meet with Trump, and the two were publicly heaping praise for each other on national television.

Most significantly, Bolsonaro has begun weakening environmental restrictions to strengthen his ties with agribusiness.

@tveitdal / Twitter

Bolsonaro is a climate-change denier. He has begun removing environmental protections on a forested coast south of Rio de Janeiro in the hopes of creating “a Cancún of Brazil.” A previous Environmental Minister has called Bolsonaro the “exterminator of the future.”

By the end of January, the administration cleared another 159 pesticides and chemicals for legal sale in the country. By March, the administration began floating the idea of loosening regulations around mining in indigenous territory.

Bolsonaro’s own son has been involved in a corruption scandal.

@AndyVermaut / Twitter

An investigation is currently underway to understand suspicious payments between Senator Flavio Bolsonaro and his former driver. A court allowed Flavio’s banking records to be examined as federal investigators call it a money-laundering investigation. This all comes after Flavio Bolsonaro suddenly purchased at least two luxury apartments in Rio de Janeiro.

Meanwhile, a movement that alleges Bolsonaro framed former President Lula de Silva on corruption is growing.

@fofunista / Twitter

Many political leaders, including Senator Bernie Sanders, have called on Bolsonaro to release Lula de Silva. All this comes after evidence that shows Bolsonaro may have conspired with prosecutor Sérgio Moro to frame Lula de Silva, which pulled him out of a race that he was projected to win.

The credibility of Bolsonaro’s presidency has gone into question.

@caribbeannewsuk / Twitter

For a man whose campaign was run on effectively draining the swamp, many Brazilians are concerned that the election was rigged by the collaboration of Moro and Bolsonaro. Six months into his Presidency, an investigation is underway.

Still, an estimated 4 million Brazilians rallied in support of Bolsonaro on May 26.

@brazil_fake / Twitter

Approximately 330 cities and initial estimates of 4 million continued loyal supporters rallied for Bolsonaro. They all want a smaller government, clean of corruption.

READ: A Tough On Drugs President Just Had 86 Pounds Of Cocaine Found In One Of His Presidential Airplanes

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A Brazilian Photographer Is Documenting Indigenous Tribes In The Amazon

Culture

A Brazilian Photographer Is Documenting Indigenous Tribes In The Amazon

ricardostuckert / Instagram

Indigenous tribes are the most important connection between man and nature. These tribes have lived off the land before modern society and many have never interacted with modern society. Ricardo Stuckert is going through and documenting the indigenous Amazonian tribes in Brazil.

Ricardo Stuckert is photographing indigenous tribespeople in the Brazilian Amazon.

The indigenous community is something sacred that most people agrees should be protected. They are more connected to the land than we are. Their customs and traditions are more ingrained in this world than ours are and it is so important to protect them.

The indigenous community of Brazil has been subjected to horrible attacks and conditions from the Brazilian government.

One of the most widespread attacks against the indigenous Brazilians living in the Amazon has been for the land. President Jair Bolsonaro has tried to take land away from the indigenous communities to allow for logging and mining. A bill he sent to the congress sought to exploit the land for commercial purposes, even legalizing some of the attacks we have seen on indigenous people since President Bolsonaro took power.

Stuckert wants to preserve the indigenous culture and customs through photos.

“I think it is important to disseminate Brazilian culture and show the way that native peoples live today,” Stuckert told DailyMail. “In 1997, I started to photograph the Amazon and had my first contact with the native people of Brazil. Since then, I have tried to show the diversity and plurality of indigenous culture, as well as emphasize the importance of the Indians as guardians of the forest. There are young people who are being born who have never seen or will see an Indian in their lives.”

The photographer believes that using photography is the best way to share culture.

“I think that photography has this power to transpose a culture like this to thousands of people,” Stuckert told DailyMail. “The importance of documentary photojournalism is to undo stigmas and propagate a culture that is being lost. We need to show the importance of indigenous people to the world, for the protection of our forests.”

You can see all of Stuckert’s photos on his Instagram.

Stuckert’s work to documented the indigenous community is giving people an insight into a life many never see. Brazil is home to about 210 million people with around 1 million having indigenous heritage. The diverse indigenous community of Brazil is something important to showcase and that’s what Stuckert is doing.

READ: Indigenous Photographer Diego Huerta’s Photos Of Oaxaca’s Indigenous People Celebrates Their Beauty

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Yes, Someone Created An Actual Honest To God 108-Foot Vulva Statue In Brazil

Fierce

Yes, Someone Created An Actual Honest To God 108-Foot Vulva Statue In Brazil

BUDA MENDES / GETTY IMAGES

There’s no denying the fact that the female form, and it’s bits, in particular, have inspired artwork the world over. Tarsila do Amaral was inspired by it. Frida Kahlo and artists like Zilia Sánchez and Marta Minujín too. Women’s bodies are inspired and so they inspire. Still, a recent unveiling of vulva artwork has become so controversial and made people so besides themselves that it seems many have forgotten these truths about our bodies.

Over the weekend, Brazilian visual artist Juliana Notari revealed her latest sculptureDiva, on a hillside at Usina del Arte. The art park is located in the Brazilian state of Pernambuco and is described by Notari as “a massive vulva / wound excavation.”

The massive sculpture created on the hillside located in northeastern Brazil features a bright pink vulva and has fueled what is being described as a cultural war.

Notari created Diva, a colorful 108-foot concrete and resin sculpture on the site of a former sugar mill. The mill was converted into an open-air museum in Pernambuco state. Last week, when Notari debuted the installation she revealed it was meant to depict both a vulva and a wound while questioning the relationship between nature and culture in a “phallocentric and anthropocentric society.”

“These issues have become increasingly urgent today,” Notari wrote in a post shared to her Facebook page which was shared alongside a series of photos of the sculpture. According to NBC, it took a team of 20 artisans 11 months to build the entire concept.

No surprise, the piece of art sparked a wave of controversy on social media, with critics and supports debating its message and significance.

Over 25,000 users have commented on Notari’s Facebook post so far including leftists and conservatives. On the far-right, supporters of President Jair Bolsonaro have also been vocal about their views of the product.

“With all due respect, I did not like it. Imagine me walking with my young daughters in this park and them asking … Daddy, what is this? What will I answer?” one user wrote in the Facebook section of the post.

“With all due respect, you can teach your daughters not to be ashamed of their own genitals,” a woman replied.

Olavo de Carvalho, an advisor to Bolsonaro, vulgarly criticized the piece on Twitter.

Notari, whose previous work has been displayed at various galleries explained on her Facebook page that she created the piece to comment on gender issues in general.

“In Diva, I use art to dialogue with…gender issues from a female perspective combined with a cosmopocentric and anthropocentric western society,” Notari shared on her post to Facebook. “Currently these issues have become increasingly urgent. After all, it is by changing perspective of our relationship between humans and nonhuman, that will allow us to live longer on that planet and in a less unequal and catastrophic society.”

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