Things That Matter

Brazil Elected A New President And People Across The World Are Comparing Him To Donald Trump

Brazil has elected far-right candidate Jair Bolsonaro to be the next president after winning a decisive election victory on Sunday, promising to drain the political swamp and tackle corruption in Latin America’s biggest country. Bolsonaro, who was a congressman for almost three decades, won 55.2 percent of the vote, defeating his opponent Fernando Haddad, who represents the left-wing Workers’ Party. He ran a campaign with rhetoric of being a new voice in Brazil with plans to return financial stability to a country that has faced recession in 2016. But his comments concerning women, race and human rights have been biggest headlines throughout the campaign that have many citing similarities to Donald Trump.

Brazil’s new president has many striking similarities to Donald Trump when it comes to rhetoric and domestic policy.

Jair Bolsonaro ran a campaign that sounded similar to Donald Trump’s back in 2016 with calls for smashing what he sees as a corrupt and irresponsible political system that has forgotten ordinary citizens. Law and order, patriotism and religious values were themes he advocated for throughout the campaign. Similar to Trump, he has also attacked his leftist detractors as enemies of the people.

During his victory rally, Bolsonaro said he was a “defender of freedom” who would run a government that would defend citizens who “follow their duties and respect the laws.” President Trump took to Twitter on Monday to congratulate Bolsonaro and said “the United States will work closely together on Trade, Military and everything else.”

Bolsonaro has made controversial comments even before he began his run for president.

Bolsonaro has drawn public criticism for his statements about women and homosexuality dating back before his run for president. Back in 2014, Bolsonaro told a congresswoman he “wouldn’t rape you because you don’t deserve it.” During a Playboy interview in 2011, he said “I would prefer my son to die in an accident than be gay,” according to the Huffington Post. Just this year, Bolsonaro was charged by Brazil’s attorney general with “inciting hatred towards black, gay and indigenous people,” the New York Times reported.

Many women have protested his victory citing fears of a more radical and nationalist Brazil that isn’t accepting of diversity and equal rights.

Women have been at the forefront of the push back against Bolsonaro and his campaign rhetoric has prompted rallies like the “Women Against Bolsonaro march” in Sao Paulo. There have been social media campaigns with the slogan #EleNão, or “Not Him” that women have used and chanted throughout his campaign. Many of them feel that Bolsonaro is a leader that isn’t cognitive of women/gay rights in Brazil.

“Bolsonaro has opened a Pandora box,” Luka Franca, a protest organizer told CNN. “He’s given a voice to an ultra right population who want to voice their prejudice and annihilate anyone who is different.”

What does Bolsonaro’s victory mean for Brazil moving forward?

With the election of Bolsonaro, Brazil enters a new era of leadership after The Workers’ Party governed Brazil for more than 13 years. Voters put him into office similarly to why many Americans voted Donald Trump into office back in 2016. Fears of lack of jobs and complacent government that citizens couldn’t trust anymore. Now Bolsonaro must make good on his campaign promises and unite a country that has been divided by a divisive election. It will have to start with the economy and more importance on job creation in Brazil.

“If the next president only governs for his supporters, the divisiveness we’re living will remain,” Marco Antonio Teixeira, a political science professor told CNN. “If he chooses to govern for the whole country, there is a greater chance these conflicts will be minimized or disappear.”


READ: Here’s Why So Many Brazilians Are Protesting One Of The Presidential Candidates

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Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro Blames Indigenous Tribes For Amazon Fires

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Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro Blames Indigenous Tribes For Amazon Fires

jairmessiasbolsonaro / Instagram

President Jair Bolsonaro is blaming the indigenous community for the fires that raged in the Amazon. The fires set off international outrage as the rainforest faced unprecedented destruction by out of control fires. President Bolsonaro went against the rest of the international community during a speech to the U.N.

Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro wants the United Nations to know that indigenous people were responsible for the Amazon fires.

In a remote session opening the U.N. General Assembly, President Bolsonaro spoke at length about the indigenous communities starting the fires. He also used the speech to speak out against the criticism his administration is receiving over his environmental policies and his response to Covid. Brazil is currently the second most infected country in the world with the second highest death rate.

The Amazon has experienced increased fires since President Bolsonaro took office.

For the first seven months of 2020, 13,000 sq. km. (5,019 sq. miles) of the Brazilian rainforest have burned. This year saw the second-highest level of fires on a global scale with fires raging across the Amazon, Australia, and the West Coast of the U.S.

President Bolsonaro openly contradicted expert findings to fit his narrative.

President Bolsonaro claims that the humidity of the forest contains the fires. According to President Bolsonaro’s speech, fires in the Amazon only happen in certain areas because of how well the humidity can keep the fires in check.

“The fires practically occur in the same places, on the east side of the forest, where peasants and Indians burn their fields in already deforested areas,” Bolsonaro said.

President Bolsonaro’s speech touches on the environmental record his administration is known for.

The Bolsonaro administration has made dismantling environmental and indigenous rights since taking power. The administration has worked to limit the amount of land available to indigenous people and to open up Amazonian rainforest to miners, loggers, farmers, developers, and other uses that are damaging and contributing to the fires. Deforestation by these industries are largely to blame for the out-of-control wildfires that burned for a very long time in the Brazilian Amazon.

Activists are getting ready to fight for the indigenous community and the rainforest.

“We must denounce this political catastrophe that destroys the environment and our future,” Sonia Guajajara, head of Brazil’s main Indigenous umbrella organization, to NBC News.

READ: Under Bolsonaro, The Brazilian Amazon Has Reached Record-Breaking Levels Of Deforestation

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Users On Reddit Are Sharing Why They Didn’t Vote In 2016 And The Answers Will Make Your Stomach Turn

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Users On Reddit Are Sharing Why They Didn’t Vote In 2016 And The Answers Will Make Your Stomach Turn

Joe Raedle / Getty

In 2016, estimates from the U.S. Elections Project showed that nearly 43 percent of eligible voters failed to fill out a ballot for the presidential election. According to Pew Research, tens of millions of registered voters did so because of a “dislike of the candidates or campaign issues.” Shockingly, this means that in 2016, the number of people who were eligible to vote and chose not to greatly outnumbered who voted for Clinton, Trump, or a third-party candidate.

Curious about this, we turned to Reddit to find out WHY people were so quick to willfully toss out their voting power.

Check out the answers we found below.

“I wasn’t scared my brown or LBGTQ country folk would actually be fucked over. I assumed it was all his [Trump’s] ploy to get the people who voted Bush and Reagan in, to vote him in… Make the white people scared and make sure they don’t trust the Dems. or people of colour or alternative life choice. I’m from L.A.; we grow up mixed and if your a decent human you respect everyone or move back to whatever hate hole you come from.” – Sgrociopath

“I moved from a strong blue state to a strong blue state on November 7, 2016, which was too late to register to vote in this year’s election(and I re-checked multiple times to make sure that was the case).” –lovethenewname

“Didn’t pay enough attention when they first started running and by the time I was looking, everyon was so polarized biased I didn’t wanna dig through the bullshit to make an educated opinion.” –AndeeRin1031

“Didn’t find a candidate I could support. The only good thing anyone else had going for them was “eh at least it’s not Hillary” and when that’s your only good trait you’re not worth my support.” – egnards

“Because I didn’t want to pledge my allegiance to a candidate and then have to defend them for their choices. I want to complain about the president because a group of yes men ultimately get you sent to a psych ward.” –buk_ow_ski

“I didn’t have a permanent address and wasn’t sure how to even anything.” –weinerpug

“I live in a completely red state and didn’t give myself enough time. I left an hour and a half early for work, sat in line for 45 minutes, realized I wasn’t going to make it and said “fuck it” and left.” –Eensquatch

“I refused to vote (my first election that I did not) simply because both candidates were disgusting and there was simply no choice I could make.”-ultimatemayerfan

“I didn’t vote despite voting in the primaries. The reason why was aside from the fake propaganda essentially the democratic party really did know who they wanted and had enacted things to make primarying difficult in order to support Clinton. Dropping people from registries, cutting down primary locations, making it so you had to be registered so many months in advance Clinton was the only option. If your party deliberately makes it hard to vote you can’t turn around a few months later and tell everyone “Okay now get out and vote!”

Also the narrative against Sanders had been “1 man can’t change things that much”. But then when it was Clinton against Trump the narrative was “1 man will ruin everything”. You don’t get to have it both ways.

I was going to be a first-time voter but then I was basically told “we don’t want you to vote unless it’s who we tell you”

I don’t regret it. Especially since my state is so red (Utah) even had I voted for Clinton I would have just been another vote that didn’t win her the election.” –collin3000

“My ballot didn’t come in the mail.” –NutellaGood

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