Things That Matter

This YouTuber Thought It Would Be Funny To Dress As A Mexican In Boyle Heights But Didn’t Get The Response He Wanted

Two YouTubers, “Kimo & Dani World” decided to use Boyle Heights as a backdrop to whatever YouTube project requires the use of cultural appropriation. Boyle Heights is a culturally rich Mexican community in Los Angeles that has long been a haven for immigrants and the Mexican-American community.

Kimo painted on a mustache, used white face paint, and threw on a sombrero and a cheap knock-off serape. Dani was carrying a camera, filming Kimo in a Mexican costume in Boyle Heights. But the community ejected him real quick.

Apparently, the guy thought it was okay to wear a culture as a costume because he’s Egyptian.

@nico_avina / Instagram

Nico Aviña, the Instagram user who confronted the YouTubers in Boyle Heights on camera, captioned the video, “This foo thought he was gonna stroll and be racist and not be called out. Nah! What was worse is he said he ain’t racist cause he is Egyptian. White girl was recording thinking all of this was funny. #boyleheights”

“I do think it’s funny.”

@nico_avina / Instagram

Though posted on Aviña’s account, a woman, named Myra, is recording the video of Aviña confronting Kimo. You can hear Aviña asking the man, “You think this is funny?” He responds “I do.” The man’s accomplice responds, smiling, “I do, yeah.”

This is the moment before the guy tells Aviña, “F*** you.”

@nico_avina / Instagram

Both Aviña and Myra are telling the disrespectful visitors to “get the f*** out” of their neighborhood. That’s the message they’re delivering these guys. Aviña asks him again, “You want to dress like that? You think this is funny?”

In one breath, Kimo responds, “I do think it’s funny. F***k you. I’m not here to disrespect you, dude.” ????

As store owners come out to stand their ground, Kimo says, “I’m spreading a f***ing good message.”

@nico_avina / Instagram

Aviña responds by saying, “Spread the good message, motherf***er.” Kimo keeps saying that he’s not trying to disrespect him, but also “it is funny” to wear traditional Mexican clothing. That’s not respect.

Their last project was a mockery of being “Homeless in Dubai.”

In a tone-deaf endeavor, Kimo dresses up like a homeless person, draws white paint on his face, like his Mexican costume, and goes around Dubai harassing locals for money and jobs. It’s not at all a social experiment nor an attempt to understand homelessness. It’s for entertainment.

This is a shot of Kimo acting like a hungry homeless person looking at pastries. ????

The video on Instagram has left many stunned that this kind of tone deaf “comedy” still happens in 2019.

@its_me_bina13 / Instagram

It wouldn’t matter if the guy was trying to raise money for Boyle Heights or raise awareness on gentrification. It doesn’t matter what the message is when the means involve wearing a culture’s traditional clothing as a costume.

Most folks commenting thank Aviña for disrupting whatever “message” they were sending.

@WUIXICAN / Instagram

“Bro, thank you,” writes @wordtrav. “damn…que pendejos but you handled it!!! I am glad you and Myra are ok,” comments @polalopez1. “I hope they never come back

Other folks are concerned about the income for serape vendors.

@SKELETO62 / Instagram

The incident took place near Mariachi Plaza in Boyle Heights, where vendors are sometimes seen selling serapes and sombreros. In a barrio where that vendor may exist and other people won’t tolerate the costume, this does spark an internal dialogue.

One person struggles to grasp how stereotypes are a manifestation of racism.

@JACK__RIPLEY / Instagram

There is no footage of Aviña touching Kimo, but at the start of the video, Kimo says, “Don’t f***ing touch me.” The majority of comments are positive, some offer a jumping off point for a dialogue, and, now, the trolls are coming in.

See for yourself. What would you do?

The real message here is that you can’t go up into Boyle Heights mocking Mexican culture. Latinos are allergic to racists and will not tolerate this en el barrio.

READ: Harvard Took A Stand Against Racism By Revoking Admission To 10 Incoming Freshmen Who Posted Obscene Memes

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‘Planeta G’ Is A YouTube Series Dedicated To Highlighting Latino Environmental Activists

Things That Matter

‘Planeta G’ Is A YouTube Series Dedicated To Highlighting Latino Environmental Activists

valentinastackl / Instagram

Greenpeace has been fighting to save the planet and the environment since 1971. The Canadian organization has been there to fight for the planet every step of the way and it has fostered new leaders. Planeta G is the latest project out of Greenpeace and it is highlighting Latinos who are in the fight to save the planet and reverse climate change.

Planeta G is here to make sure that Latino environmental activists get the recognition that they deserve.

The bi-weekly web series is centered around exploring the intersectionality between environmental activism and the Latino identity. According to a recent study by Yale, 70 percent of Latinos are concerned about the environment. Latinos are also among the communities more disproportionately impacted by climate change.

According to an interview with Grist, Valentina Stackl and Crystal Mojica started “Planeta G” in order to highlight more Latino voices. Communities of color face several instances of environmental injustice in their communities. This includes lack of access to affordable healthcare, education, and housing.

It is brought to you by two co-hosts: Crystal Mojica.

Mojica is a senior communications specialist for Greenpeace USA and, according to the website, has spent a lot of her career in the environmental space. Mojica, who was raised in Colombia as a child, has volunteered for the Peace Corps and worked to advance reproductive rights for all women.

And Valentina Stackl.

Stackl was born in Europe after her mother, a Jewish-Chilean journalist, fled the Pinochet dictatorship in Chile. After moving to the U.S. at 16, Stackl got involved in international environmental justice starting with working with farmworkers.

The co-hosts are also using their platform to remind people to vote and the importance of using their voice.

The next election is drawing near and there are so many reasons for Latinos to vote. They have to make their voices heard and there are several issues that deeply impact the community.

“Latinx people are especially becoming more empowered than ever before to speak out. But we’ve done it before,” Stackl told Grist. “Historically, we think back to Dolores Huerta and Cesar Chavez and the labor movement. Sometimes we forget that. We care. The experiences of the people that we’ve spoken to on the show reflect that.”

The co-hosts are delivering more than interviews to combat climate change.

It is known that the vegan diet is more sustainable and better for the environment. Being vegan means you are helping to cut down on greenhouse gases from farming. There is also the benefit of not contributing to deforestation for farmland due to the demand of meat in the world.

The vegan versions of Latino foods is still in line with the web series’ mission to challenge dispel myths about Latinos. Planeta G is showing how you can make some delicious versions of Latino food without using all of the animal products. They even promise to fool your mom.

READ: Environmental Advocates Are Offering Tips On How People In Mexico City Can Shop With The New Plastic Bag Ban

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Kobe Bryant’s Wrongful Death Lawsuit Has Tragically Been Moved To Federal Court Despite Vanessa Bryant’s Pleas

Entertainment

Kobe Bryant’s Wrongful Death Lawsuit Has Tragically Been Moved To Federal Court Despite Vanessa Bryant’s Pleas

kobebryant / lacosheriff / Instagram

Updated October 7, 2020.

Soon after basketball player Kobe Bryant was killed in a Jan. 26 helicopter crash alongside his 13-year-old daughter, Gianna, and seven others, reports surfaced from the Los Angeles Times that L.A. County sheriff’s deputies had captured and shared photos of the accident site. Abominably, these images included pictures of the victims. Worse, deputies allegedly continued to share the photos in the days following the horrific accident that transpired in Calabasas, California.

During a time when she should have been allowed to mourn, Bryant’s wife Vanessa Bryant worked to file a lawsuit against the Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department alleging violation of privacy.

Bryant’s wrongful death lawsuit against the owner of Kobe Bryant’s doomed helicopter has been moved to federal court.

Bryant’s lawsuit claimed Island Express is liable for the deaths of her husband and daughter because the helicopter was only licensed to fly in visually navigable conditions.

According to paperwork obtained by the Daily News, Bryant filed her original wrongful death complaint against Island Express Helicopters this past February at Los Angeles County’s Superior Court. In response, the helicopter company filed a cross-complaint against two federal air traffic controllers, “triggering the venue change.”

Vanessa’s lawyers have argued that the removal was made as part of a “transparent and untenable attempt to forum-shop their way into federal court.”

“Defendants unlawfully and improperly seek to deprive Mrs. Bryant of her lawful choice of forum in California state court,” the lawyers argued in a September filing.

In response to Bryant’s lawsuit, California Governor Gavin Newsom signed a bill in September to prohibit first responders from taking photographs of deceased victims ″outside of job duties.”

AB 2655 was signed by Newsom on Monday and prohibits first responders from taking photographs, not related to job duties, of deceased victims. According to KCBS, Violation of the law will result in a misdemeanor.

AB 2655 states that “Existing law generally prohibits a reproduction of any kind of photograph of the body, or any portion of the body, of a deceased person, taken by or for the coroner at the scene of death or in the course of a post mortem examination or autopsy, from being made or disseminated. Existing law generally makes a person who views, by means of any instrumentality, including, but not limited to, a camera or mobile phone, the interior of any area in which the occupant has a reasonable expectation of privacy, with the intent to invade the privacy of a person or persons inside, guilty of a misdemeanor. This bill would make it a misdemeanor for a first responder, as defined, who responds to the scene of an accident or crime to capture the photographic image of a deceased person for any purpose other than an official law enforcement purpose or a genuine public interest. By creating a new crime, the bill would impose a state-mandated local program. The bill would require an agency that employs first responders to, on January 1, 2021, notify those first responders of the prohibition imposed by the bill. By increasing the duties of local agencies, the bill would impose a state-mandated local program.”

The images of the crash site victims occurred despite a personal request from Vanessa Bryant to Sheriff Alex Villanueva on the morning of the crash to request the site be secured for privacy.

This was a legal claim filed against the department in May.

″In reality, however, no fewer than eight sheriff’s deputies were at the scene snapping cell-phone photos of the dead children, parents, and coaches,″ the document filed by Vanessa explained ″As the Department would later admit, there was no investigative purpose for deputies to take pictures at the crash site. Rather, the deputies took photos for their own personal purposes.”

Vanessa Bryant filed a lawsuit against the Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department.

On Jan. 26, a helicopter carrying Kobe and Gianna Bryant, Payton and Sarah Chester, Alyssa, Keri, and John Altobelli, Christina Mauser, and pilot Ara Zobayan crashed in the Calabasas hills. The sudden death devastated those who knew Kobe and the city of Los Angeles that mourned his death for months after.

Vanessa was shocked to hear that the sheriff deputies took photos of her husband’s and daughter’s bodies at the crash site.

“This lawsuit is about accountability and about preventing this disgraceful behavior from happening to other families in the future who have suffered loss,” Vanessa’s attorney, Luis Li, said in a statement. “The department formally refused Mrs. Bryant’s requests for information, saying it was ‘unable to assist’ with any inquiry and had no legal obligation to do so. It’s now for a court to tell the department what its obligations are.”

Bryant sued the department claiming damages for emotional distress, negligence, and invasion of privacy.

Kobe fans are upset with the LACSD and the allegations that the deputies took these photos.

According to TMZ, Sheriff Alex Villanueva knew about the photos taken by eight deputies and shared within the department. They were also shared in the Lost Hills Sheriff’s substation. Sheriff Villanueva told the deputies to delete the photos from their phones and felt confident they did so.

A trainee allegedly shared the photos with a woman in a bar.

A witness to the event said that a trainee took out his phone and showed a woman the photos to impress her. The bartender overheard the conversation and filed an online complaint about the trainee and their behavior with the photos. The trainee showed the woman the photos a few days after the crash leading many to believe that the sheriff’s department was fully aware of the photos.

Kobe fans are standing behind Vanessa as she follows through with her lawsuit.

Reports state that the sheriff’s department told deputies to delete the images to avoid disciplinary action. The coverup is sparking outrage by Kobe fans who are angered that the department did not do enough to protect the dignity and privacy of all of the victims of the crash.

Mitú will update this story as it continues to develop.

READ: Vanessa Bryant Forced To Respond To ‘Beyond Hurtful’ Comments Made By Her Own Mom On ‘El Gordo y La Flaca’

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