Things That Matter

Border Patrol Found $4 Million On An Abandoned Boat In Puerto Rico And People Want It Used For The Migrant Crisis

While Mexico was beating the U.S. in soccer and Brazil was taking home a Copa América trophy Sunday, U.S. Customs and Border Protection agents were chasing a boat off the coast of Puerto Rico. Authorities noticed that the boat was traveling without any lights on, and they found that suspicious enough to tail. The boat was traveling from Puerto Rico to the US Virgin Islands.

Then, the boat made a sudden turn back towards the east coast of Puerto Rico, Fajardo. The boat docked near Rio Fajardo, and authorities watched, in the dark, several people unloading bags. Border Patrol decided to approach the vessel, and as they closed in, the unidentified people fled the boat.

They left behind $3.7 million in cash.

Credit: U.S. Customs and Border Protection

U.S. Customs and Border Protection released a statement on Monday detailing the events of the seizure, which is now in the DEA’s authority. “We remain committed to working with other federal and local law enforcement partners to detect and deter smuggling attempts throughout the Caribbean,” stated Johnny Morales, Director, Air and Marine Operations for the Caribbean Air and Marine Branch. 

The agents had to call for a Marine Patrol Aircraft to help with the chase.

Credit: @jodi_mohrmann / Twitter

The aircraft helped to maintain surveillance of the suspect vessel. The currency was seized under failure to declare and bulk cash smuggling laws. The suspects are still at large.

A loaded Taurus .40 caliber pistol and 63 rounds of ammunition were also found.

Credit: @ACEV305 / Twitter

As miraculous as it seems to stumble upon $3,700,000 U.S. dollars, clearly something shady was going on here. Given the DEA’s current involvement, it seems the U.S. government suspects a drug operation.

That said, most folks don’t trust that it was just $3.7 million found.

Credit: @jmarkwalk / Twitter

Americans’ trust in law enforcement is weak. Many folks don’t trust that the agents wouldn’t skim some money off the top of what was found. Ultimately, only the suspects really know how much money was abandoned on deck.

In fact, there are quite a few conspiracy theories floating around already.

Credit: @johnd6661950 / Twitter

Everyone has a different mathematical calculation for corruption. Some folks suspect police would skim the top 20 percent while others think they’d only leave 10 percent into federal government hands. We’re sure someone has dedicated their life’s work to this calculation. DM us.

Since the fortune has been found, calls for Puerto Rican aid have resurfaced.

Credit: @jaynettedavid / Twitter

We say resurfaced as if Puerto Rico hasn’t been screaming for help for years now. The truth is that this feels like another opportunity to give back to Puerto Rico what it has lost, both in infrastructure and in lives as a result of government negligence.

The student loan debt crisis in America is so real that it’s hard not to find someone talking about their debt.

Credit: @capnkrunk22 / Twitter

You better believe that an old white man responded to her comment telling her off for not working for her money. Politics. It’s like everyone gets to pretend that nothing has changed in this country, including the rise in student tuition and decline in high-paying jobs. We digress, but we also see you.

Some of us are taking this moment to talk about the efficiency of border walls.

Credit: @preahkaew / Twitter

They’re just not efficient. Militarizing borders isn’t the source of solution to end drug crimes or the gang wars that are causing Central American migrants to flee their homes. In this case, Border Patrol likely destabilized a drug cartel. That’s a job we can give a round of applause for.

Real talk, most of us are just wondering what we would do with $4 million if we found it.

@GeniusJester / Twitter

Would you turn it in? Pay off your student loan debts first? Buy your padres a nice casita? Send it all to the border to buy kids some freaking soap and toothpaste? 

If you have a little extra cash to spare, consider donating to the Trans Latina Coalition, which is working on creating safer, more dignified conditions for trans Latinas in immigrant detention centers. 

READ: Sickening Screenshots Show Border Patrol Agents Laughing About Migrant Deaths

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Coinstar Comes Through For Man Who Received Last Paycheck Of 91,500 Pennies

Things That Matter

Coinstar Comes Through For Man Who Received Last Paycheck Of 91,500 Pennies

After Andreas Flaten’s former employer dumped at least 90,000 pennies on his driveway last month as a form of final payment for his work at an auto shop, Coinstar is stepping up to help.

The company picked up Flaten’s coins on Thursday and rounded up the amount to give him a $1,000 check. Flaten had been spending an hour or two every night trying to clean the pennies, which he stored in a wheelbarrow in his garage.

They also made donations to two charities of Flaten’s choosing: two animal shelters. 

“Coinstar has been in the coin business for 30 years and we process approximately 41 billion coins annually – so picking up 91,000 pennies was all in a day’s work,” Coinstar CEO Jim Gaherity said in a statement.

Original Story Published March 25, 2021:

Quitting a job isn’t always easy, quite often one of the parties is left upset or angry. But the breakup of a Georgia man and a car repair shop has taken things to new depressing low. He was Paid his fianl Paycheck With 91,500 Pennies

Sure, the man received his money and it’s all totally legal but it still sucks the way that he was ‘paid’ and the Internet is rightfully freaking out on the man’s behalf.

Georgia man is paid his final paycheck with 91,500 pennies.

A Georgia man, Andreas Flaten, who had been waiting on his final $915 paycheck from when he quit his job at the A OK Walker Luxury Autoworks, was finally paid but not in a very nice way. Sure, 91,500 pennies are real and actual money but it’s not exactly a convenient way to get paid.

The coins, he said, were dumped on his drive way and also are apparently covered in an oily substance he suspects might be power-steering fluid. The coin drop was discovered on March 12. Flaten told the New York Times he believes the payment was taken as a punishment after he quit his job and demanded the company pay him his final paycheck.

Flaten said the pennies were delivered by someone who he believes to be a current employee of the shop at 7 P.M. ET on March 12. The load, which weighed more than 500 lbs., came with a short, obscenity-ridden note, he said.

It sounds like the auto shop is a pretty toxic place to work.

Flaten said he quit the job because of broken promises over when he could leave each day to pick up his child from day care. He gave notice that he planned to quit late last year, but left earlier after further disagreements at the job. When he did not receive his final paycheck, he filed a claim with the U.S. Department of Labor, which reached out to the repair shop three times.

Miles Walker, the owner of the repair shop told CBS46, an Atlanta TV station, “I don’t know if I did that or not, I don’t really remember. … It doesn’t matter. He got paid. That’s all that matters. He’s a f*****g weenie for even bringing it up.”

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Today, Puerto Rico Celebrates Emancipation Day–the Day When the Island Officially Abolished Slavery

Things That Matter

Today, Puerto Rico Celebrates Emancipation Day–the Day When the Island Officially Abolished Slavery

Photo via George W. Davis, Public Domain

Today, March 22nd marks Día de la Abolición de Esclavitud in Puerto Rico–the date that marks the emancipation of slaves in Puerto Rico. In Puerto Rico, enslaved peoples were emancipated in 1873–a full decade after the U.S. officially abolished slavery. But unlike the U.S. mainland, Puerto Rico celebrates today as an official holiday, where many businesses are closed.

The emancipation of Puerto Rican slaves was a very different process than the United States’. For one, the emancipation was gradual and over three years.

When the Spanish government abolished slavery in Puerto Rico 1873, enslaved men and women had to buy their freedom. The price was set by their “owners”. The way the emancipated slaves bought their freedom was through a process that was very similar to sharecropping in the post-war American south. Emancipated slaves farmed, sold goods, and worked in different trades to “buy” their freedom.

In the same Spanish edict that abolished slavery, slaves over the age of 60 were automatically freed. Enslaved children who were 5-years-old and under were also automatically freed.

Today, Black and mixed-race Puerto Ricans of Black descent make up a large part of Puerto Rico’s population.

The legacy of enslaved Black Puerto Ricans is a strong one. Unlike the United States, Puerto Rico doesn’t classify race in such black-and-white terms. Puerto Ricans are taught that everyone is a mixture of three groups of people: white Spanish colonizers, Black African slaves, and the indigenous Taíno population.

African influences on Puerto Rican culture is ubiquitous and is present in Puerto Rican music, cuisine, and even in the way that the island’s language evolved. And although experts estimate that up to 60% of Puerto Ricans have significant African ancestry, almost 76% of Puerto Ricans identified as white only in the latest census poll–a phenomenon that many sociologists have blamed on anti-blackness.

On Puerto Rico’s Día de la Abolición de Esclavitud, many people can’t help but notice that the island celebrates a day of freedom and independence when they are not really free themselves.

As the fight for Puerto Rican decolonization rages on, there is a bit of irony in the fact that Puerto Rico is one of the only American territories that officially celebrates the emancipation of slaves, when Puerto Rico is not emancipated from the United States. Yes, many Black Americans recognize Juneteenth (June 19th) as the official day to celebrate emancipation from slavery, but it is not an official government holiday.

Perhaps, Puerto Rico celebrates this historical day of freedom because they understand how important the freedom and independence is on a different level than mainland Americans do.

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