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Third Person In A Month Has Been Detained By ICE While Riding A Greyhound Bus

Twitter/@FLImmigrant

Border Patrol agents in Florida entered a Greyhound bus and asked people to show I.D.

According Florida Immigrant Coalition (FLIC), who posted the video on Twitter, agents boarded the Greyhound bus on Saturday at around 4:30 p.m. in Fort Lauderdale and asked passengers to provide paperwork proving their citizenship. The group added “Proof of citizenship is NOT required to ride a bus!”

FLIC also asked several organizations, including Greyhound, to comment publicly about this incident, saying “[they should] speak out about how these enforcement sweeps are scaring away customers and violating the constitutional rights of riders. Or does Greyhound believe anyone that rides their buses must prove citizenship?”

FLIC later confirmed that the woman seen in the video was detained by ICE, adding “her daughter-in-law who dropped her off at Greyhound Friday morning has not heard from her since.”

The group has raised concern for the woman’s safety and has questioned whether Greyhound had collaborated with ICE in this raid.

The woman complied with the agents without any issue. She got her things and got off the bus.

“My mother-in-law came to visit me last week,” the woman’s daughter-in-law told FLIC. “She’s my daughter’s grandmother and this was the first time meeting each other. I dropped her off at the Greyhound bus stop Friday morning and never got word of her arrival. I’m very concerned about these officers questioning her without a lawyer present.”

This is not the first time agents have boarded a bus and detained people for not having ID.

CREDIT: komonews.com

Earlier this month, a father and son were also detained aboard a Greyhound bus. Sergio Vera, 18, and his dad Martin Vera were headed from Seattle to Montana when Border Patrol agents stopped them and asked for I.D., according to Komonews.com.

When they failed to provide documentation, they were escorted off the bus. Sergio says that while he is undocumented, he does have Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) status. Neither of them have a criminal record.

When Sergio informed officers of his DACA status, he was told it had expired.

“I had DACA. They said it expired. They said Trump already took that away,” Sergio told komonews.com.

He was released hours later after providing a photo of his DACA paperwork and extension notification, which his mother sent to him via text.

Greyhound has yet to release a statement regarding Border Patrol agents entering their buses.

READ: Bay Area Prepares For Possible Massive Raids of Undocumented Immigrants

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A Court Ruled That These Men Could Get Married In Costa Rica But They Are Being Forced To Wait For A Law Change

things that matter

A Court Ruled That These Men Could Get Married In Costa Rica But They Are Being Forced To Wait For A Law Change

@Roberthcstllo / Twitter

The first same-sex marriage in Costa Rica has been blocked because of a difference of opinion in the nation’s government.

Earlier this year, the Inter-American Court of Human Rights ruled in favor of same-sex marriage.

Countries under their jurisdiction were told to start recognizing same-sex unions. The push for same-sex marriage goes directly against the growing opposition from the Catholic church. The decision to expand this right in Latin American came just days before Pope Francis visited Peru and Chile.

The Inter-American Court of Human Rights is a governing body representing 23 countries in the Americas, including Argentina, Bolivia, Colombia, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Mexico, and the Dominican Republic.

Now, the same country behind the petition for increased LGBTQ+ rights is arguing over the power hierarchy. The victim is the country’s first same-sex marriage since the decision. According to NewNowNext, Roberth Castillo and Mario Arias planned to get married but hit a roadblock when a notary council refused to register their marriage. The council referenced a national law that banned same-sex marriage. The president of Costa Rica ordered government agencies to follow the ruling while Costa Rican lawmakers changed the law to allow for same-sex marriage.

“There’s nothing stopping the road to equality, but the truth is we don’t know how long it will take to get there,” the couple’s attorney Larissa Arroyo said, according to Reuters.

The couple has postponed their wedding as they wait for the Costa Rican government to make a decision.

“The Superior Notary Council’s agreement not only contradicts the opinion, but also the position of the Executive Power regarding the ruling,” Costa Rica Justice Minister Marco Feoli said in a statement.


READ: A Gay Man’s Brutal Torture And Murder In 2012 Changed Thoughts On Gay Rights, Now Chile Is Talking Marriage Equality

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