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Betsy DeVos Says Teachers And Principals Can Report Undocumented Students To ICE

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Betsy DeVos said schools should be able to report undocumented kids to Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) if they’re inclined to.

DeVos testified before the House Committee on Education and the Workforce on May 22. During that conversation, she was asked if principals and teachers should report undocumented students or families to ICE, NBC reports.

“I think that’s a school decision, it’s a local community decision,” DeVos said, according to NBC. “And again, I refer to the fact that we have laws and we also are compassionate, and I urge this body to do its job and address and clarify where there is confusion around this.”

New York Democrat Rep. Adriano Espaillat addressed DeVos by telling her that immigration law is a federal law, and cannot be applied on a local level.

“Let me just remind madam chair that immigration law is federal law. It’s not local law,” Espaillat said, according to NBC. “You cannot have immigration law for one state be different than for another state. It applies to everybody across the country.”

He also listed several instances in which parents have been taken away by ICE right in front of their children at school. He asked her what she thought about that and she said that “people must follow the law of the land.”

Espaillat later said that DeVos is a “clear and present danger” and should resign.

In an op-ed for The Hill, Espaillat cited a policy that states U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS), ICE, and U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) each have issued and implemented policies concerning enforcement actions at or focused on sensitive locations which include schools and churches.

“The goal of the policy put in place by ICE is to ‘ensure that these enforcement actions do not occur at nor are focused on sensitive locations such as schools…’ This policy, signed on Oct. 24, 2011, continues to remain in effect, guaranteeing our students and their families the right to school drop off, school attendance, and school pickup without fear of being detained or forced into deportation proceedings.”

People on social media criticized DeVos’s answers during her hearing before the House Committee on Education and the Workforce.

Kristen Clarke, president and executive director of the Lawyers’ Committee for Civil Rights Under Law, told Politico that the fact that DeVos is undermining the policy in place and is giving schools power that they are not entitled to.

“The suggestion that individual schools should have discretion to determine if and when to report undocumented students flies in the face of well-settled and long-standing Supreme Court precedent which makes clear that no student should be denied the right to a public education based on their immigration status,” Clarke said, adding that her words may have “a chilling effect on families seeking to attend and enroll in our public schools, and invite mischief from schools across the country.”


READ: LAUSD Just Made It Harder For ICE To Walk Onto Their School Campuses

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20 Latinos Who Have Spoken Out About Being 'Latino Enough'

things that matter

20 Latinos Who Have Spoken Out About Being ‘Latino Enough’

If you’re Latino-American, you’ve probably felt, or even been called out, for not being ‘Latino enough’ or even ‘American enough.’ Growing up Latino comes with its own set of insecurities because there is no question that we aren’t as connected with our roots as our parents, or theirs, or theirs. We get to take the best from the culture we live in and the culture we grew up in and create a new one.

Hear this and let it sink in: You will never be any less Latino no matter what language you speak, or what anyone tells you. If you don’t believe me, hear it from the greats.

1. Selena Quintanilla

Latino enough
CREDIT: @onlyselenaq / Instagram

The Selena was accused of not being Latino enough because she didn’t learn Spanish growing up, but remained proud and true to her Mexican roots: “Although my Spanish is a little weak I feel that I am Mexican.”

2. J.Lo

CREDIT: @jlo / Instagram

Then, Jennifer Lopez got flack from the press to play Selena in the 1997 film. All because she “didn’t speak very good Spanish — which Selena [Quintanilla] didn’t either.”

3. Gina Rodriguez

CREDIT: @hereisgina / Instagram

Jane the Virgin star told HuffPost Live, “You want to tell me I’m not Latino enough? I am as Latina as they come. And I am not defined by anybody’s definition of Latina.” Even better, she said, “I’m going to be reprimanded by a culture that I’m supposed to support and is supposed to support me because of the way I was raised? That is too limiting. That is unfair.”

4. Camila Mendes

CREDIT: @camimendes / Instagram

Riverdale star, Camila Mendes, told People Chica, “I often hear things like, ‘You don’t look Latina enough, ‘ and that mentality is so backwards. The fact is: I am Latina, so how are you going to tell me that I don’t look Latina?”

5. Cardi B.

CREDIT: @iamcardib / Twitter

Cardi B. has been through it for being Afro-Latina. “Just like everybody else, we came over here the same fucking way. I hate when people try to take my roots from me,” she told CR Fashion Book.  “I really just want people to understand that the color that I have and features that I have are not from two white people fucking.”

6. Bella Thorne

CREDIT: @bellathorne / Instagram

Back in 2015, mitad-Cubana, Disney star Bella Thorne told HuffPost Live, “You don’t have to be brunette to be Latin. It’s just a fact: I’m naturally blonde, and Cameron Diaz is Latin, she’s Cuban and she doesn’t look Latin. People ask me all the time: How did you have a quinceañera if you’re not Latin?”

7. Demi Lovato

CREDIT: @ddlovato / Instagram

“I’m really proud of [my heritage], especially the way that the Latin community is kind of taking over and rising above politically,” she told HuffPost. “Even though I don’t speak fluent Spanish, I love singing in Spanish. I love being able to represent the curvy sassiness of a Latina woman. It’s just a part of who I am, and I couldn’t be more proud to represent that.”

8. Eva Longoria

CREDIT: @evalongoria / Instagram

Eva Longoria is one of our favorite Latinas on screen. She told O, The Oprah Magazine, “I’m proud to have a Mexican heritage, and I’ve always deeply rooted my identity in it. Then, about ten years ago, I went to Mexico … when I got there, I was perceived as American because I didn’t speak Spanish and at the time knew very little about the history of Mexico. Yet in America, I was considered Mexican because of how I looked and my last name. It was confusing. I thought, ‘If I’m not Mexican, and I’m not American, who am I?’”

9. America Ferrera

CREDIT: @americaferrera / Instagram

Apparently, that feeling is mutual America Ferrera told Contact Music, “There’s this tug-of-war between two cultures. Am I Latin? Am I American? What the hell am I? I love my culture and I’m very proud of my culture. I want to learn so much about where my family is from and my roots and to know Spanish. But when you’ve lived your entire life in American schools, you don’t get that.”

10. Rosario Dawson

CREDIT: @rosariodawson / Instagram

Dawson told Latina Magazine, “I think being Latina is about having pride in your heritage. Although I am not a fluent Spanish speaker and I can’t make every dish without a recipe, I am 100 percent Boricua and I am proud of that.”

11. Dascha Polanco

CREDIT: @sheisdash / Instagram

Orange is The New Black queen told Vivala, “When you look at Latinas who are succeeding in Hollywood, they’re super thin and you really can’t tell if she’s Latina or not.” She told Vibe, “If I’m not American enough and I’m not Latina enough, then what am I? I’m just nothing.”

12. Christina Aguilera

CREDIT: @xtina / Instagram

Christina Aguilera is half Irish and have Ecuadorean and proud of it, but has faced the “enough” cirticism countless times. She told Latina,  “I don’t speak the language fluently… I should not have to prove my ethnicity to anyone. I know who I am. All I know is no one can tell me I’m not a proud Latina woman… I dove headfirst into a Spanish-language album for that reason and I’m planning another one even though I don’t speak the language. I’m sure that doesn’t sit well with some people.”

13. Kat Von D

CREDIT: @katvondmexico / Instagram

Beauty visionary Kat Von D told People en Español, “Throughout my entire life, people have assumed that I am only white and part of me gets frustrated because I would not be who I am if it were not because I grew up in this [Mexican] culture. I always say that I am Latina, but I have a stronger connection with Mexico, where I was born. There is a visual richness in that culture that inspires me a lot and can be seen in my work.”

READ:  20 Pictures From Kat Von D’s Wedding You Probably Didn’t See

14. Lauren Jauregui

CREDIT: @laurenjauregui / Instagram

Cuban-American Fifth Harmony star clapped back at a radio piece based out of Spain that questions the legitimacy of American celebrities’ latinidad.

She tweeted, “An article based off of opinion. I feel Latina because I was born in a Latin family. I speak the language, I cook the food. I have been part of the Latino community in Miami since I was born; I have always had them around me. Anyone could tell you that.”

15. Christina Milian

CREDIT: @christinamilian / Instagram

Christina told Huffington Post, “As far as Afro-Cuban [goes], I’m finding more and more that there’s people opening their eyes to seeing that. Latinos come in all colors, all shades…. You should see my mom and her brothers and sisters. Same parents, but we just vary in color, shapes and sizes. But we’re still Latinos — that doesn’t change a damn thing. You can tell it’s in the core of our blood.”

16. La La Vasquez

CREDIT: @celebalore / Instagram

La La wrote an essay for Latina, “The character can be Puerto Rican and speak Spanish just like me. But Hollywood defines Latina as Jennifer Lopez and Sofia Vergara. As beautiful as they are, we’re not all one race in Latin America. But I don’t go to auditions so that I can give history lessons to film executives.”

17. Becky G.

CREDIT: @iambeckyg / Instagram

In an essay for PopSugar, Becky G. wrote one of the best essays of all time. Here’s the bombshell: “The truth is, the lack of language knowledge does not lessen the Latin blood running through our veins or the stories our last names carry.”

18. Gina Torres

CREDIT: @ginatorresfanpage / Instagram

Actress Gina opened up in a Black and Latino video to tell the world that, “When I became an actress, I quickly realized that ‘the world’ liked their Latinas to look Italian. Not like me. So I wasn’t going up for Latina parts…Regardless of the fact that I spoke the language and understood the culture better, those weren’t the parts that I could take seriously. Suddenly I had to explain why I look the way I look.”

19. Jessica Alba

CREDIT: @jessicaalba / Instagram

As a third generation Mexican-American, Alba understands the complexities around living in two cultures. She told Glam Belleza Latina, “I’ve always felt closer to being a Latina than anything else, because I grew up with my dad’s family, who are Mexican American. I never really identified any other way.”

READ : 20 Facts About Jessica Alba That Might Surprise You

20. Laz Alonso

CREDIT: @lazofficial / Instagram

“You’re not one or the other,” Alonso told NBC Universo. “You’re both. And you should be proud of being both. And not be embarrassed or ashamed of it. There’s nothing to be ashamed of.”