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Here Are 25 Of The Best Signs From Nationwide #MarchForOurLives Protests

If you went to one of the 800+ #MarchForOurLives protests on Saturday, you were part of history in the making. It was organized entirely by the student survivors of Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida. Seeing students and young children literally marching for their lives was a horror and an inspiration at the same time.

If you weren’t able to make it, no te preocupes. Here are some of the most iconic moments and signs from around the country.

Hundreds of thousands of people took to the streets in the nation’s capitol.

@marchforourlives / Instagram

Organizers say over 850,00 people showed up. If you think President Trump had to deal with this crowd, you’d be wrong. The president was in Florida avoiding the crowds.

Latinxs tell it like it is, como siempre.

@lgbt.saga_.support_ / Instagram

Here’s to hoping they both become less and less available. P.S. – This is coming to you from El Paso, Texas, alleged gun country.

We even brought our homeboy Jesús to try to get through to the gov’t.

@caffeinepdx / Instagram

I wanna say that most Latinos would get behind this message, and would definitely make sure your mom or abuelita never ever saw it. But they’d probably like it too.

Oh, and people hate the NRA.

@snippetsofboston / Instagram

Did we fail to mention that in the last page? People were furious with those gun-crazies. These are our lives on the line. Don’t tell me about your hobby.

Chicago was lit up with sass.

@stacejams / Instagram

Non-hispanic white men have carried out 63 percent of mass shootings over the last several decades. When that happens, it’s mental illness. If you’re brown, you’re a terrorist. #WhitePrivilege is in the headlines, folks.

Emma González inspired all the signs.

@laurenxdeutsch / Instagram

You know Emma González as one of the first students survivors from Parkland to passionately demand stricter gun control laws. Or, if you’re Iowa Rep Steve King, you might see her Cuban Pride patch and think (and then say), “Communist!”

The truth is González is inspiring students all the way in Seattle to become activists.

@francinescottphoto / Instagram

González’s activism automatically extends to her appearance. It’s pretty sickening to learn that Republican Maine House candidate Leslie Gibson called the teenage survivor a “skinhead lesbian” because he “cares about the Constitution.” K. We can thank González for staying strong and dragging another Republican out of the race to represent us in the House.

Gun control heated up some #WomensMarch debates.

@prettybirdjulie / Instagram

I mean, verdad ^, Denver. Why is that? Maybe because there are more NRA-corrupt politicians in office than actual women.

The most traumatic sightings were of some very young children holding signs.

@denisecrew / Instagram

Here in LA, this young boy literally holds up his own two hands to deliver el mensaje: NI UNO MÁS #marchforourlives ✊?✊?✊?✊?

“Kids Rule, Guns Drool”

Mary Norman Gilpin Hudson / Facebook

Adios, el corazón. It breaks my heart to see children carrying these signs. Meanwhile this is in Palm Beach, where Trump goes to procrastinate his presidential duties and golf.

Could you imagine being afraid to go to school? ?

@peopleandscapes / Instagram

Poetry:

“No guns

no guns no gun

no guns in school

no guns in school

no gun in school.”

Meanwhile in Amsterdam…

@marchforourlivesnl / Instagram

OK, fam, let’s move to the Netherlands. I’m rallying Latinos. Let’s do it for real. We’re known for our survival skills and this is the solution, estoy segura.

Nevermind. We gotta stay for the kids in Long Beach, California.

@marchforourliveslb / Instagram

This is our fight, and fighting is in our DNA. Register to vote and then vote for politicians that are not bought out by the NRA.

“Sorry for the inconvenience. We are trying to change the world.”

@marchforourlivesak / Instagram

True story: polls show that 75 percent of Americans want more gun control laws. Now we need to vote like we mean it.

People even turned out in Alaska, a pretty gun-heavy state.

@marchforourlivesak / Instagram

“Keegan Blain, 17 year-old Dimond High School junior // “It doesn’t matter if we are conservative or liberal, a Democrat or a Republican. There isn’t anything more important than protecting innocent lives that will soon propel our nation into the future.” #marchforourlives #marchforourlivesak”

 Austin, Texas kids say the darndest things.

@rachelrose094 / Twitter

I can’t tell if she’s #MomOfTheYear or is just happy that it’s not her kid calling the world assholes. Either way, this is a new kind of teenage rebellion, kid, and I’m here for it.

Teachers got loud this weekend.

@kareng651 / Instagram

ICYMI, President Trump wants teachers to carry guns. That’s his solution to the mass shooting epidemic: Bring more guns into schools. I like this protestor’s solution a lot better.

Oh, and teachers aren’t fans of President Trump’s ideas either.

@artistsforactionchicago / Instagram

Other signs noted: “Give teacher’s higher wages to teach, not to return fire.” I trust you girl.

#PosterArt you can only find in Orlando, Florida.

@designs_by_robert / Instagram

My second home, and more widely known as the home to the largest ever mass shooting against LGBTQ Latinos in Pulse Nightclub, the signs seen in Orlando, Florida carried a lot of passion behind them. ?

Dreamers in Atlanta, Georgia:

@elyserosem / Instagram

For Dreamers, this is about creating an America that we can survive in. Political activism is the best way to show you love your country, imho.

#MFOL Mantra: “Enough is Enough.”

Maggie R. Kleinow / Facebook

I can’t imagine how heartbreaking it must have been to create this sign, and draw the faces of school shooting victims. Ultimately, it isn’t about some ideological debate. It’s about each of these victims, piling on top of one another without any retribution or change. #EnoughisEnough

In places like Bozeman, Montana, there were counter protests.

Faye Dalton Craig‎ / Facebook

People actually went against these kids to “March for Our Guns.” Just shows that there are always two sides in each debate.

And then there was a Parkland, Florida rally.

@EdWeekMMolnar / Twitter

“She was shot on 2/14. Today she will speak to thousands in Parkland.” ?

Parkland student wisdom right here:

Eyoälha Eyoälha Eyoälha / Facebook

Are we not collectively disgusted by the amount of standardized testing we went through that can go completely out the window in a single second? Because all you need is proof that you’re 18 to buy an assault weapon.

The students of Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School are not giving up the fight for gun reform.

@marchforourlivesparkland / Instagram

This includes fighting for every other victim of gun violence, including Trayvon Martin, Philando Castile, Renisha McBride, Tamir Rice. Find out how you can keep the fight going at MarchForOurLives.com.

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Exclusive: Luis Fonsi Talks Working with Rauw Alejandro, Christina Aguilera, and Demi Lovato

Entertainment

Exclusive: Luis Fonsi Talks Working with Rauw Alejandro, Christina Aguilera, and Demi Lovato

Luis Fonsi is kicking off 2021 with a new single. The Puerto Rican superstar premiered the music video for “Vacío” on Feb. 18 featuring rising Boricua singer Rauw Alejandro. The guys put a new spin on the classic “A Puro Dolor” by Son By Four.

Luis Fonsi throws it back to his románticas.

“I called Omar Alfanno, the writer of ‘A Puro Dolo,’ who is a dear friend,” Fonsi tells Latido Music. “I told him what my idea was [with ‘Vacío’] and he loved it. He gave me his blessing, so I wrote a new song around a few of those lines from ‘A Puro Dolor’ to bring back that nostalgia of those old romantic tunes that have been a part of my career as well. It’s a fresh production. It sounds like today, but it has that DNA of a true, old-school ballad.”

The world got to know Fonsi through his global smash hit “Despacito” with Daddy Yankee in 2017. The remix with Canadian pop star Justin Bieber took the song to new heights. That was a big moment in Fonsi’s music career that spans over 20 years.

There’s more to Fonsi than “Despacito.”

Fonsi released his first album, the fittingly-titled Comenzaré, in 1998. While he was on the come-up, he got the opportunity of a lifetime to feature on Christina Aguilera’s debut Latin album Mi Reflejo in 2000. The two collaborated on “Si No Te Hubiera Conocido.” Fonsi scored multiple Billboard Hot Latin Songs No. 1s in the years that followed and one of the biggest hits was “No Me Doy Por Vencido” in 2008. That was his career-defining romantic ballad.

“Despacito” remains the second most-viewed music video on YouTube with over 7.2 billion views. The hits did not stop there. Later in 2017, he teamed up with Demi Lovato for “Échame La Culpa,” which sits impressively with over 2 billion views.

He’s also appearing on The Voice next month.

Not only is Fonsi working on his new album, but also he’s giving advice to music hopefuls for the new season of The Voice that’s premiering on March 1. Kelly Clarkson tapped him as her Battle Advisor. In an exclusive interview, Fonsi talked with us about “Vacío,” The Voice, and a few of his greatest hits.

What was the experience like to work with Rauw Alejandro for “Vacío”?

Rauw is cool. He’s got that fresh sound. Great artist. Very talented. Amazing onstage. He’s got that great tone and delivery. I thought he had the perfect voice to fit with my voice in this song. We had talked about working together for awhile and I thought that this was the perfect song. He really is such a star. What he’s done in the last couple of years has been amazing. I love what he brought to the table on this song.

Now I want to go through some of your greatest hits. Do you remember working with Christina Aguilera for her Spanish album?

How could you not remember working with her? She’s amazing. That was awhile back. That was like 1999 or something like that. We were both starting out and she was putting out her first Spanish album. I got to sing a beautiful ballad called “Si No Te Hubiera Conocido.” I got to work with her in the studio and see her sing in front of the mic, which was awesome. She’s great. One of the best voices out there still to this day.

What’s one of your favorite memories of “No Me Doy Por Vencido”?

“No Me Doy Por Vencido” is one of the biggest songs in my career. I think it’s tough to narrow it down just to one memory. I think in general the message of the song is what sticks with me. The song started out as a love song, but it turned into an anthem of hope. We’ve used the song for different important events and campaigns. To me, that song has such a powerful message. It’s bigger than just a love song. It’s bringing hope to people. It’s about not giving up. To be able to kind of give [people] hope through a song is a lot more powerful than I would’ve ever imagined. It’s a very special song.

I feel the message is very relevant to the COVID-19 pandemic we’re living through.

Oh yeah! I wrote that song a long time ago with Claudia Brant, and during the first or second month of the lockdown when we were all stuck at home, we did a virtual writing session and we rewrote “No Me Doy Por Vencido.” Changing the lyrics, kind of adjusting them to this situation that we’re living now. I haven’t recorded it. I’ll do something with it eventually. It’s really cool. It still talks about love. It talks about reuniting. Like the light at the end of the tunnel. It has the hope and love backbone, but it has to do a lot with what we’re going through now.

What do you think of the impact “Despacito” made on the industry?

It’s a blessing to be a part of something so big. Again, it’s just another song. We write these songs and the moment you write them, you don’t really know what’s going to happen with them. Or sometimes you run into these surprises like “Despacito” where it becomes a global phenomenon. It goes No. 1 in places where Spanish songs had never been played. I’m proud. I’m blessed. I’m grateful to have worked with amazing people like Daddy Yankee. Like Justin Bieber for the remix and everyone else involved in the song. My co-writer Erika Ender. The producers Mauricio Rengifo and Andrés Torres. It was really a team effort and it’s a song that obviously changed my career forever.

What was the experience like to work with Demi Lovato on “Echáme La Culpa”?

She’s awesome! One of the coolest recording sessions I’ve ever been a part of. She really wanted to sing in Spanish and she was so excited. We did the song in Spanish and English, but it was like she was more excited about the Spanish version. And she nailed it! She nailed it from the beginning. There was really not much for me to say to her. I probably corrected her once or twice in the pronunciation, but she came prepared and she brought it. She’s an amazing, amazing, amazing vocalist.

You’re going to be a battle advisor on The Voice. What was the experience like to work with Kelly Clarkson?

She’s awesome. What you see is what you get. She’s honest. She’s funny. She’s talented. She’s humble and she’s been very supportive of my career. She invited me to her show and it speaks a lot that she wanted me to be a part of her team as a Battle Advisor for the new season. She supports Latin music and I’m grateful for that. She’s everything you hope she would be. She’s the real deal, a true star, and just one of the coolest people on this planet.

What can we expect from you in 2021?

A lot of new music. Obviously, everything starts today with “Vacío.” This is literally the beginning of what this new album will be. I’ve done nothing but write and record during the last 10 months, so I have a bunch of songs. Great collaborations coming up. I really think the album will be out probably [in the] third or fourth quarter this year. The songs are there and I’m really eager for everybody to hear them.

Read: We Finally Have A Spanish-Language Song As The Most Streamed Song Of All Time

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Lifestyles Of The Rich And Dangerous: Cartels Are Using TikTok To Lure Young People

Things That Matter

Lifestyles Of The Rich And Dangerous: Cartels Are Using TikTok To Lure Young People

If you’ve ever wondered what someone with a bulletproof vest and an AR-15 would look like flossing — the dance, not the method of dental hygiene — apparently the answer to that question can be found on TikTok.

Unfortunately, it’s not as a part of some absurdist sketch comedy or surreal video art installation. Instead, it’s part of a growing trend of drug cartels in Mexico using TikTok as a marketing tool. Nevermind the fact that Mexico broke grim records last year for the number of homicides and cartel violence, the cartels have found an audience on TikTok and that’s a serious cause for concern.

Mexican cartels are using TikTok to gain power and new recruits.

Just a couple of months ago, a TikTok video showing a legit high-speed chase between police and drug traffickers went viral. Although it looked like a scene from Netflix’s Narcos series, this was a very real chase in the drug cartel wars and it was viewed by more than a million people.

Typing #CartelTikTok in the social media search bar brings up thousands of videos, most of them from people promoting a “cartel culture” – videos with narcocorridos, and presumed members bragging about money, fancy cars and a luxury lifestyle.

Viewers no longer see bodies hanging from bridges, disembodied heads on display, or highly produced videos with messages to their enemies. At least not on TikTok. The platform is being used mainly to promote a lifestyle and to generate a picture of luxury and glamour, to show the ‘benefits’ of joining the criminal activities.

According to security officials, the promotion of these videos is to entice young men who might be interested in joining the cartel with images of endless cash, parties, military-grade weapons and exotic pets like tiger cubs.

Cartels have long used social media to shock and intimidate their enemies.

And using social media to promote themselves has long been an effective strategy. But with Mexico yet again shattering murder records, experts on organized crime say Cartel TikTok is just the latest propaganda campaign designed to mask the blood bath and use the promise of infinite wealth to attract expendable young recruits.

“It’s narco-marketing,” said Alejandra León Olvera, an anthropologist at Spain’s University of Murcia, in a statement to the New York Times. The cartels “use these kinds of platforms for publicity, but of course it’s hedonistic publicity.”

Mexico used to be ground zero for this kind of activity, where researchers created a new discipline out of studying these narco posts. Now, gangs in Brazil, Colombia, El Salvador, and the United States are also involved.

A search of the #CartelTikTok community and its related accounts shows people are responding. Public comments from users such as “Y’all hiring?” “Yall let gringos join?” “I need an application,” or “can I be a mule? My kids need Christmas presents,” are on some of the videos.

One of the accounts related to this cartel community publicly answered: “Of course, hay trabajo para todos,” “I’ll send the application ASAP.” “How much is the pound in your city?” “Follow me on Instagram to talk.” The post, showing two men with $100 bills and alcohol, had more than a hundred comments.

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