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Here Are 25 Of The Best Signs From Nationwide #MarchForOurLives Protests

Maggie R. Kleinow / Facebook

If you went to one of the 800+ #MarchForOurLives protests on Saturday, you were part of history in the making. It was organized entirely by the student survivors of Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida. Seeing students and young children literally marching for their lives was a horror and an inspiration at the same time.

If you weren’t able to make it, no te preocupes. Here are some of the most iconic moments and signs from around the country.

Hundreds of thousands of people took to the streets in the nation’s capitol.

CREDIT: @marchforourlives / Instagram

Organizers say over 850,00 people showed up. If you think President Trump had to deal with this crowd, you’d be wrong. The president was in Florida avoiding the crowds.

Latinxs tell it like it is, como siempre.

CREDIT: @lgbt.saga_.support_ / Instagram

Here’s to hoping they both become less and less available. P.S. – This is coming to you from El Paso, Texas, alleged gun country.

We even brought our homeboy Jesús to try to get through to the gov’t.

CREDIT: @caffeinepdx / Instagram

I wanna say that most Latinos would get behind this message, and would definitely make sure your mom or abuelita never ever saw it. But they’d probably like it too.

Oh, and people hate the NRA.

CREDIT: @snippetsofboston / Instagram

Did we fail to mention that in the last page? People were furious with those gun-crazies. These are our lives on the line. Don’t tell me about your hobby.

Chicago was lit up with sass.

CREDIT: @stacejams / Instagram

Non-hispanic white men have carried out 63 percent of mass shootings over the last several decades. When that happens, it’s mental illness. If you’re brown, you’re a terrorist. #WhitePrivilege is in the headlines, folks.

Emma González inspired all the signs.

CREDIT: @laurenxdeutsch / Instagram

You know Emma González as one of the first students survivors from Parkland to passionately demand stricter gun control laws. Or, if you’re Iowa Rep Steve King, you might see her Cuban Pride patch and think (and then say), “Communist!”

The truth is González is inspiring students all the way in Seattle to become activists.

CREDIT: @francinescottphoto / Instagram

González’s activism automatically extends to her appearance. It’s pretty sickening to learn that Republican Maine House candidate Leslie Gibson called the teenage survivor a “skinhead lesbian” because he “cares about the Constitution.” K. We can thank González for staying strong and dragging another Republican out of the race to represent us in the House.

Gun control heated up some #WomensMarch debates.

CREDIT: @prettybirdjulie / Instagram

I mean, verdad ^, Denver. Why is that? Maybe because there are more NRA-corrupt politicians in office than actual women.

The most traumatic sightings were of some very young children holding signs.

CREDIT: @denisecrew / Instagram

Here in LA, this young boy literally holds up his own two hands to deliver el mensaje: NI UNO MÁS #marchforourlives ✊?✊?✊?✊?

“Kids Rule, Guns Drool”

CREDIT: Mary Norman Gilpin Hudson / Facebook

Adios, el corazón. It breaks my heart to see children carrying these signs. Meanwhile this is in Palm Beach, where Trump goes to procrastinate his presidential duties and golf.

Could you imagine being afraid to go to school? ?

CREDIT: @peopleandscapes / Instagram

Poetry:

“No guns

no guns no gun

no guns in school

no guns in school

no gun in school.”

Meanwhile in Amsterdam…

CREDIT: @marchforourlivesnl / Instagram

OK, fam, let’s move to the Netherlands. I’m rallying Latinos. Let’s do it for real. We’re known for our survival skills and this is the solution, estoy segura.

Nevermind. We gotta stay for the kids in Long Beach, California.

CREDIT: @marchforourliveslb / Instagram

This is our fight, and fighting is in our DNA. Register to vote and then vote for politicians that are not bought out by the NRA.

“Sorry for the inconvenience. We are trying to change the world.”

CREDIT: @marchforourlivesak / Instagram

True story: polls show that 75 percent of Americans want more gun control laws. Now we need to vote like we mean it.

People even turned out in Alaska, a pretty gun-heavy state.

CREDIT: @marchforourlivesak / Instagram

“Keegan Blain, 17 year-old Dimond High School junior // “It doesn’t matter if we are conservative or liberal, a Democrat or a Republican. There isn’t anything more important than protecting innocent lives that will soon propel our nation into the future.” #marchforourlives #marchforourlivesak”

 Austin, Texas kids say the darndest things.

CREDIT: @rachelrose094 / Twitter

I can’t tell if she’s #MomOfTheYear or is just happy that it’s not her kid calling the world assholes. Either way, this is a new kind of teenage rebellion, kid, and I’m here for it.

Teachers got loud this weekend.

CREDIT: @kareng651 / Instagram

ICYMI, President Trump wants teachers to carry guns. That’s his solution to the mass shooting epidemic: Bring more guns into schools. I like this protestor’s solution a lot better.

Oh, and teachers aren’t fans of President Trump’s ideas either.

CREDIT: @artistsforactionchicago / Instagram

Other signs noted: “Give teacher’s higher wages to teach, not to return fire.” I trust you girl.

#PosterArt you can only find in Orlando, Florida.

CREDIT: @designs_by_robert / Instagram

My second home, and more widely known as the home to the largest ever mass shooting against LGBTQ Latinos in Pulse Nightclub, the signs seen in Orlando, Florida carried a lot of passion behind them. ?

Dreamers in Atlanta, Georgia:

CREDIT: @elyserosem / Instagram

For Dreamers, this is about creating an America that we can survive in. Political activism is the best way to show you love your country, imho.

#MFOL Mantra: “Enough is Enough.”

CREDIT: Maggie R. Kleinow / Facebook

I can’t imagine how heartbreaking it must have been to create this sign, and draw the faces of school shooting victims. Ultimately, it isn’t about some ideological debate. It’s about each of these victims, piling on top of one another without any retribution or change. #EnoughisEnough

In places like Bozeman, Montana, there were counter protests.

CREDIT: Faye Dalton Craig‎ / Facebook

People actually went against these kids to “March for Our Guns.” Just shows that there are always two sides in each debate.

And then there was a Parkland, Florida rally.

CREDIT: @EdWeekMMolnar / Twitter

“She was shot on 2/14. Today she will speak to thousands in Parkland.” ?

Parkland student wisdom right here:

CREDIT: Eyoälha Eyoälha Eyoälha / Facebook

Are we not collectively disgusted by the amount of standardized testing we went through that can go completely out the window in a single second? Because all you need is proof that you’re 18 to buy an assault weapon.

The students of Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School are not giving up the fight for gun reform.

CREDIT: @marchforourlivesparkland / Instagram

This includes fighting for every other victim of gun violence, including Trayvon Martin, Philando Castile, Renisha McBride, Tamir Rice. Find out how you can keep the fight going at MarchForOurLives.com.

You Can Help Save Indigenous Languages From Extinction By Downloading One Of These 5 Apps

Culture

You Can Help Save Indigenous Languages From Extinction By Downloading One Of These 5 Apps

joshuaproject / Instagram

For many of us, our ability to speak Spanish or Portuguese is a huge part of our Latinidad. But with millions of people speaking Indigenous languages in Latin America, we know this is far from the truth. Spanish is, of course, one thing that unites most of Latin America together, but it’s a language that was imposed on us. It’s one reason some Mexican writers have rejected Spanish to write in Indigenous languages. For those of us who are interested in learning Indigenous languages, technology has become a serious lifeline.

We already use apps for dating and social media to checking the weather or shopping, so why not use it to help us get in touch with our deeper identity?

Several apps have sprung over the last few years to help us learn the Indigenous languages of Latin America. If you’re looking to take on a new language, here are a few apps you should check out:

Náhuatl

Credit: Matthew Powell / Flickr

With an estimated 1.5 million speakers, Náhuatl is the most commonly spoken Indigenous language in Mexico. Yet despite its prevalence in rural Mexico, there are still few courses or resources available for learning it.

The digital app “Vamos a Aprender Náhuatl” (Let’s Learn Náhuatl) offers learners the chance to approach the language as spoken in the town of Acatlán, in the southern state of Guerrero. In a self-taught manner, you can learn the numbers, greetings, animals, body parts, fruits, plants, and some verbs. The app – which is in Spanish and Náhuatl – also features quizzes to help users retain their lessons.

Mixtec

Credit: @fonsecahendris / Instagram

Kernaia has also developed an app for learning Mixtec, a branch of Indigenous languages spoken by more than half a million people. The app allows learners to navigate through 20 language lessons which teach greetings, numbers, and colors. The lessons are all set in the Santa Inés de Zaragoza community in the southern state of Oaxaca, and the app teaches people about the culture and traditions of the community.

Purépecha

Credit: VillageBosque / Instagram

The Kernaia project says that its mission is to create “an ecosystem of digital content for Indigenous languages.” To move toward this goal, the organization has created a similar app for Purépecha, a language spoken by nearly 200,000 people in the western state of Michoacán.

After the passing of Mexico’s Indigenous language law in 2000, languages including Purépecha were given official status equal with Spanish in the areas where it is spoken. Digital learning aids such as those offered by Kernaia are vital to heightening awareness of both the Purépecha language and the culture of the Purépecha people, who often experience poverty and marginalization.

As well as teaching words related to daily activities, Kernaia’s website says that the app offers a journey into “the space where they take place: the family, the community, the kitchen, the field, the celebrations, and other elements that represent the town’s identity and enrich our cultural diversity.”

Habla Quechua

Credit: ilovelanguages / Youtube

Quechua’s one of the most widely spoken indigenous language in the Americas. PromPerú developed the Habla Quechua app “with the aim of inspiring Peruvian citizens and foreigners to use and take an interest in the Quechua language.” The app – which is available to English, French, German, Portuguese, and Spanish speakers – features quizzes and a live translator feature.

Duolingo

DuoLingo offers courses in more than 20 languages, including the Jopará dialect of Guaraní, which is spoken in Paraguay. There is also a course for Navajo that is currently in Beta. The app offers quizzes and immediate grading.

So what do you think? Are there any Indigenous languages you’d like to learn that don’t have an app yet?

Keds Latest Designs Proves That Avoiding Cultural Appropriation In Fashion Is Totally Possible

Culture

Keds Latest Designs Proves That Avoiding Cultural Appropriation In Fashion Is Totally Possible

Keds

It’s always really cool to see a big name brand embrace the art of our Latinidad. It’s like a nod to all of the great Latinx artisans who add beauty and color to our culture. In fact, seeing consumers enthusiastically welcome these goods feels like further validation. With this in mind, it makes this new collaboration all the sweeter for us art and fashion lovers.

Keds is collaborating with designers Thelma Dávila and Lolita Mia on a line inspired by the Latina-created brands.

Instagram / @Keds

In what the shoe company is calling a “collaboration fiesta,” Keds released three fun and vibrant new designs.

Some of the shoes borrow inspiration from Thelma Dávila’s colorful Guatemalan textiles. Alternatively, other pairs utilize Lolita Mia’s festive fringe as embellishments. These touches combine with Keds’ original platform shoes to make a unique product.

Of the partnership with these new brands, Keds’ website says:

“It’s so rewarding to be able to be a part of the professional and personal growth of women who decided to follow their dreams. Entrepreneurs (especially female ones) are always brave, they’re risk-takers that believe strongly in themselves. And we believe in them too. We’re so excited to introduce you to our latest for-women-by-women collaborations.”

The Thelma Dávila brand is named after its Guatemalan founder.

Keds

The company specializes in designing and crafting unique pieces by hand. Furthermore, their products utilize Guatemalan textiles, leathers and non-leather materials. Obviously, this collaboration is built on a solid relationship between the two brands. Since last year, Keds retail locations have carried Thelma Dávila bags and products in stores.

On their website, Keds said the design collaborations were intent on “taking geometric design and color cues from [Dávila’s] native culture, our classic Triple Kick gets transformed into a fiesta-ready standout.”

Founded by jewelry artisan and entrepreneur, Elena Gil, Lolita Mia is a Costa Rican accessory brand.

Keds

While studying abroad in Italy, Gil made a significant personal discovery. She realized that ethnic crafts and traditions were very alike across regions. Specifically, they were similar in cultural importance. In light of this, she decided to start her own brand. Lolita Mia’s handmade products embrace what Gil has coined a “Universal Ethnic Luxury.”

Of the collaboration with Lolita Mia, Keds’ website reads:

“[The] aesthetic shines through in these playful renditions of our platforms in the form of fun, festive fringe and punchy tropical shades.”

The Ked × Lolita Mia collaboration has two designs while the Ked x Thelma Dávila collab is made up of one.

Instagram / @lolitamiacr

“Triple Tassel” is a multicolored platform with purple, pink, orange and white tassels attached to the laces. “Triple Decker Fringe” is an off-white platform slip-on with multi-colored fringe and golden embellishments on top. The “Triple Kick” features a neutral platform with Guatemalan textile accents around the bottom.

Each design is priced at $70 a pair. Moreover, they are available exclusively on Keds’ website. Be sure to order yours today and add a little extra Latinx flare to your summer looks.

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