Things That Matter

AOC Shutting Down Kellyanne Conway For Accusing Her Of ‘Catfighting’ Is What I’m Thriving On Right Now

The House of Congress is sure looking like an episode of “Jerry Springer” lately — and surprisingly enough it’s all coming from the Democratic side. We’re used to political drama from the White House Administration, primarily from President Trump, but now it’s coming from the female Dems, and it sure doesn’t make the party look good. 

Here’s how this mess first began. 

On July 6, Democratic speaker of the United States House of Representatives, Nancy Pelosi, had some fighting words for women in her own party. 

AOC calls Nancy Pelosi ‘outright disrespectful’ for singling out women of color https://t.co/Oe6ii2IRuh pic.twitter.com/VG8sSHzZHY— New York Post (@nypost) July 11, 2019

Rep. Pelosi interviewed in the opinion section of the New York Times, spoke at length about first-time representatives that were elected last year in the primaries including Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, Rep. Ilhan Omar, Rep. Rashida Tlaib and Rep. Ayanna Pressley. At the core of the matter was that Rep. Pelosi disrespected the freshmen representatives, primarily about their massive following on social media. 

“All these people have their public whatever and their Twitter world,” Rep. Pelosi said in the publication. “But they didn’t have any following. They’re four people, and that’s how many votes they got.”

Her issue over their growing Twitter followers is that followers don’t constitute more votes in the House, meaning, just because they might have millions of people following them on social media, doesn’t mean they get more votes when deciding on a bill. 

The bill that struck a divide between Rep. Pelosi and the freshmen representatives was about federal aid funding.

Last month, Congress passed a $4.6 billion humanitarian aid package — the final vote was 305 to 102 — several liberal Democrats (including the entire Hispanic Caucus) were furious that they voted to give Trump any money that he could use for whatever he wanted including border security and detention centers. The liberal Democrats want to shut them down completely, not help sustain them. 

“This bill — opposed by the Hispanic Caucus and nearly 100 Democratic members of the House — will not stop the Trump administration’s chaos and cruelty,” the Hispanic Caucus said in a statement provided by the Times. “What happened today is unacceptable, and we will not forget this betrayal.”

That betrayal is still intense between liberal Democrats and Rep. Pelosi and now White House Advisor, KellyAnne Conway is getting in on the action by poking fun at the infighting between the women.

Conway called the turbulence between Rep. Pelosi and the four freshmen Democrats a “catfight.”

During an interview on Fox News, Conway said that Rep. Pelosi’s words in the Times article were a “Major meow moment.” She added that Rep. Pelosi is a “brushing back in a huge catfight,” and “Really ridiculing them.” 

She also added that the liberal Democrats went to the detention centers to “preen around” yet would not vote for a bill to help the situation. 

“You know who suffered?” she asked on Fox News. “The people suffered, our brave men and women at Border Protection, the kids who these Democrats pretend they care so much about.”

Rep. Ocasio-Cortez took Rep. Pelosi’s comment to heart and said on social media that the veteran politician is singling them in a very disrespectful way.

Rep. Ocasio-Cortez said Rep. Pelosi’s words about their Twitter followers is not irrelevant but actual public opinion. 

“That public ‘whatever’ is called public sentiment,” Rep. Ocasio-Cortez said. “And wielding the power to shift it is how we actually achieve meaningful change in this country.”

Rep. Tlaib also spoke against Rep. Pelosi’s words and said to ABC News that it was “very disappointing” that the leader of their party “would ever try to diminish our voices in so many ways.”

In an interview with The Washington Post, Rep. Ocasio-Cortez went further and alleged that Rep. Pelosi didn’t respect them because they are women of color. 

“When these comments first started, I kind of thought that she was keeping the progressive flank at more of an arm’s distance in order to protect more moderate members, which I understood,” said said. “But the persistent singling out. . . It got to a point where it was just outright disrespectful. . . the explicit singling out of newly elected women of color.”

Rep. Ocasio-Cortez, alleging discrimination by Rep. Pelosi, fueled the fire to this intense feud between tho women, and Rep. Pelosi said her comment was offensive. 

https://twitter.com/search?f=images&q=AOC%20pelosi&src=typd&lang=en

“Our members took offense at that,” Rep. Pelosi said, according to Fox News. “I addressed that.” She also added that she would continue to have a dialogue about this issue appropriately. 

“I said what I’m going to say in the Caucus. That’s where this is appropriate,” Pelosi said, according to CBS News, “I’m not going to be discussing it any further.”

It is disheartening to hear Rep. Pelosi being so dismissive of the point of view of women who are not only elected officials just as she is but who has also just entered the political forum. You would think she’d be more of a mentor, especially since they’re on the same party. 

For the most part, since Trump’s election, it’s always been the Democrats versus the Republicans, but now it’s becoming a chaotic mess, and we’re hoping — for the sake of unity — that it gets sorted out soon. 

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AOC Gets Under Ted Cruz’s Skin With Crack About His Mexican Getaway After He Accuses Her Of Pushing For ‘open borders’

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AOC Gets Under Ted Cruz’s Skin With Crack About His Mexican Getaway After He Accuses Her Of Pushing For ‘open borders’

Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez and Sen. Ted Cruz are at it again on Twitter. This time it’s about immigration policy. After recently traveling to the US-Mexican border to underline the recent rise in immigration, Cruz accused AOC of pushing for a “full open borders” policy.

And of course, AOC got him with some solid zingers.

AOC in turn hit back at Cruz for recently fleeing his home state of Texas during its power grid collapse to vacation in Cancún.

In response to Cruz’s attack, AOC suggested Mexico avoid allowing Cruz in the next time he attempts to vacation there. She also called on him to resign from office for his attempt to overturn the results of the 2020 presidential election.

“Ted, this is pretty rich coming from someone who fled their own home (and responsibilities) during an environmental crisis to cross the border and seek refuge in Mexico,” Ocasio-Cortez tweeted. “Also you funded cages, expanded cages, and yet you’re complaining about cages. You have no policy, just puff.”

Ocasio-Cortez accused Republicans of hypocritically attacking the current administration’s detention of migrant children at the border after they supported President Donald Trump’s policy of separating migrant parents from their children.

Currently, Democrats like AOC are calling on Biden to impliment more liberal immigration policies.

Republicans have strongly expressed their dislike for the recent rise in migrants which has come as a result of Biden’s reversal of Trump’s most rigid border policies.

AOC is currently a co-sponsor of the Roadmap to Freedom resolution. The resolution calls on the Federal Government to develop and implement a Roadmap to Freedom “in order to overhaul the outdated immigration system in the United States that has gone without significant reform for decades, and to relieve the great human impact an unjust system bears on communities around the country.”

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9 Films, Docs and Series About Latinas to Watch Before Women’s History Month Comes to an End

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9 Films, Docs and Series About Latinas to Watch Before Women’s History Month Comes to an End

Whether you want to celebrate Women’s History Month with a movie night or appreciate media about powerful mujeres year-round, you’re probably looking for a few films, documentaries or TV series to add to your streaming queue right now. Regrettably (and shamefully), most of the lists cropping on entertainment news sites don’t feature projects made for, by or about Latinas. With that in mind, we’ve put together some titles centering narratives about Latina trailblazers and heroines from Latin American and U.S. history. So clear your weekend cal and purchase all of your fave movie theater snacks, because you can watch (most of) these films, documentaries and series right from your computer screen.

1. Dolores

If you’re looking for documentaries about Latina heroines, start with Dolores, the 2017 film about the life and activism of Chicana labor union activist Dolores Huerta. The doc, executive produced by Carlos Santana and Benjamin Bratt, and directed by Bratt’s brother, Peter, delves into how the 90-year-old co-founded the National Farm Workers Association (later named the United Farm Workers), her famous “Sí se puede” rallying cry and her role in the women’s rights movement. Including interviews with Angela Davis, Gloria Steinem, Hillary Clinton, Barack Obama and more, Dolores celebrates the history and ongoing activism of one of the country’s most critical civil rights leaders. Watch Dolores on Amazon Prime.

2. Isabel: The Intimate Story Of Isabel Allende

Isabel: The Intimate Story Of Isabel Allende, a three-part docuseries about the famed Chilean author and feminist, is one of the most exciting new drops. The HBO Max series, directed by Rodrigo Bazaes, premiered on March 12, just in time for Women’s History Month. Like all good biopics, Isabel reveals the person behind the icon, portraying Allende’s path from a young woman fighting her way into a male-dominated industry to the most-read Spanish-language author of all time. As the niece of assassinated Chilean President Salvador Allende, the series also gets political, bringing light to her life under the regime of General Augusto Pinochet as well as her own feminist activism. Watch Isabel on HBO Max.

3. Knock Down the House

Knock Down the House portrays the political rise of a Latina icon in the making: Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez. While the 2019 documentary by Rachel Lears revolves around the 2018 congressional primary campaigns of four progressive women, Ocasio-Cortez, Amy Vilela, Cori Bush and Paula Jean Swearengin, the Puerto Rican now-congresswoman is the only one who wins her race (though Bush won in the next election cycle) and thus much of the film focuses on her story. A first-time candidate with a passion for social justice, a degree in international relations and economics, and a job in bartending, the doc shows how a regular, degular, shmegular girl from the Bronx unseated one of the most powerful Democrats in Congress with a progressive platform and a focus on community. Watch Knock Down the House on Netflix.

4. Lorena: Light-Footed Woman

In 2017, María Lorena Ramírez’s name made international headlines when the young woman defeated 500 other runners from 12 different countries at the Ultra Trail Cerro Rojo in Puebla, Mexico. Ramírez didn’t just stand out because of her speed but also because she ran without professional gear. Instead, she donned the traditional clothes of the Tarahumara, Indigenous people in Chihuahua, Mexico, including a floral skirt and a pair of huaraches. Capturing the world’s attention, Ramírez became the focus of the 2019 documentary Lorena: Light-Footed Woman, which was directed by Juan Carlos Rulfo. The short doc beautifully tells the tale of a young woman’s athletic training in the mountains where she grew up to become a celebrated long-distance runner while staying true to her culture and traditions. Lorena: Light-Footed Woman is streaming on Netflix.

5. Berta Didn’t Die, She Multiplied!

In Honduras, the most dangerous country in the world for land defenders, Berta Cáceres’ life was taken because of her commitment to the environmental justice struggle. Back in the Central American country, Berta’s assassination hasn’t been forgotten and neither has her fight. The 2017 short doc Berta Didn’t Die, She Multiplied!, directed by Sam Vinal, shows how her work lives on among Indigenous Lenca and Afro-Indigenous Garifuna people of Honduras, who continue to struggle against capitalism, patriarchy, racism and homophobia, for our land and our water. Watch Berta Didn’t Die, She Multiplied! on Vimeo.

6. Celia

Celia reveals the story of one of the most powerful voices and greatest icons of Latin music, Afro-Cubana salsera Celia Cruz. The Spanish-language novela, produced by Fox Telecolombia for RCN Televisión and Telemundo, starts at the beginning, when Cruz was an aspiring singer in Havana, and takes viewers through to her time joining La Sonora Matancera, leaving her homeland with her would-be husband Pedro Knight and gaining massive superstardom as the “Queen of Salsa.” Watch Celia on AppleTV+.

7. Beauties of the Night

In the first half of the 20th century, showgirls dominated the entertainment scene in Latin America. Their glamorous looks and luxe performances were enjoyed by audiences of all ages and genders. But around the 1970s, as VHS pornos took off, these scantily clad talents started to lose work and, as a result, their lucrative incomes. Oftentimes, these women came from low-income backgrounds and didn’t have a formal education, forcing many of the vedettes to also feel like they’ve lost their sense of purpose and impelling some to take on work they didn’t feel good about in order to stay afloat in the industry. In Beauties of the Night, directed by María José Cuevas, we see some of Mexico and South America’s leading showgirls, Olga Breeskin, Lyn May, Rossy Mendoza, Wanda Seux and Princesa Yamal, and how their lives transformed as the work they were once famous for lost its reverence. Watch Beauties of the Night on Netflix.

8. Frida

The 2002 biographical drama film Frida shares the professional and private life of one of the most famous woman artists of all time, Frida Kahlo. Directed by Julie Taymor and starring Salma Hayek, the Academy Award-nominated film touches on many aspects of the late Mexican artist and feminist’s life, from her life-altering accident in 1922 and her tumultuous relationship with muralist Diego Rivera to her bisexual identity, political affiliations and, of course, her time-defying art and self portraits. Watch Frida on Amazon Prime.

9. Rita Moreno: Just a Girl Who Decided to Go For It


With a career spanning 70 years, Rita Moreno is one of the most famous and beloved actresses of all time. The only Latina to have won all four major annual U.S. entertainment awards, an Emmy, a Grammy, an Oscar and a Tony, her own life is certainly worthy of a film; and in 2021, director Mariem Pérez Riera gave the Puerto Rican star what she deserves with Rita Moreno: Just a Girl Who Decided to Go for It. The documentary, which premiered at the 2021 Sundance Film Festival on January 29, 2021, features interviews with Moreno, Eva Longoria, Gloria Estefan, Normal Lear, Whoopi Goldberg and more. More than just a celebration of all the barriers Moreno broke, the film also delves into her personal life, including the racism she endured on her road to stardom, the sexual violence she experienced in Hollywood, her struggle with mental health and suicidal ideation and her fight for multidimensional roles for people of color. While Rita Moreno: Just A Girl Who Decided To Go For It isn’t streaming yet, it is set to air on PBS’ American Masters later this year.

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