Things That Matter

An Adorable Moment Is Making The Rounds After An 8-Year-Old Boy Consoled His Crying Classmate With Autism On The First Day Of School

The first day of school jitters can affect different people in different ways. For young children, this is especially true. While some kids might feel excited to start the new year in a new classroom, with a new class schedule, teachers, and new friends — others are completely terrified of the change. And it’s completely okay. So when an 8-year-old boy helped his classmate deal with the first day of school jitters by holding his hand as they both walked into school, our hearts couldn’t help but melt. 

On August 14, a photo of 8-year-old Christian Moore holding his classmate’s hand, Connor Crites, during their first day of the second grade at the Minneha Elementary School in Wichita, Kansas. It was the purest moment on the internet in weeks.

Crites told local reporters that he was having a difficult day and that his classmate, Christian Moore, extended his hand to him in a kind gesture. “He was kind to me,” the second-grader told KAKE. “I started crying and then he helped me. And, I was happy. He found me and held my hand and I got happy ears.” 

Moore’s mother, the second-grader who reached out to Crites after he saw he was struggling during his first day of school, wrote on Facebook that she was “so proud of her son.” 

“[He saw] a kid balled up into a corner crying, so he went to console him, grabbed his hand and walked him inside of the school! It is an honor to raise such a loving, compassionate child! He’s a kid with a Big heart, the first day of school started off write, she wrote in the caption.” 

While this is such a simple and sweet gesture, it’s important to highlight the importance of this because we don’t see it often. 

(Photo credit: Courtney Coko Moore)

Sometimes children aren’t super comfortable with showing a softer side, especially in school, so to see this happen among two young boys gives a bit of hope that we can see more and more moments like this.

Moore’s Facebook photo quickly gained a lot of attention and has been shared over 27,000 times in a matter of days. It’s also gotten over 21,000 likes and over 7,000 comments. 

Folks shared their positive thoughts in Moore’s Facebook comments calling the moment “beautiful” and other comments told the mother that the photo warmed their hearts.

(Photo credit: Courtney Coko Moore/Facebook comments)

One commentator said the 8-year-old’s actions were a testament to what a wonderful mother she is. (We definitely agree with that!)

Other people continued to root him on and express how it makes them happy to see young kids support each other in this way. 

(Photo credit: Courtney Coko Moore/Facebook comments)

After all, it shows our future generations supporting one another. We’re so glad that other young kids who might come across this post will see how they, too, can show kindness through their actions in someone else’s moment of need. It doesn’t take a lot to be kind or lend a helping hand, and 8-year-old Christian Moore is a perfect example of that.

Most importantly, however, April Crites, the mother of the other boy in the photo, also came across the post.

“Tell your son I said thank you so very much! That little boy he helped is my son and is autistic,” Crites commented on Moore’s post, according to KWCH-TV. “I worry every day that he is going to get bullied for being different and your son just absolutely warmed my heart. If there were more children like him I wouldn’t worry about such things.” 

No parent should have to live with that fear when sending his/her daughter/son to school every morning. Children should be taught to be kind to one another instead of bully each other. So, we’re definitely glad that there are parents raising their kids to act out of compassion and empathy first and foremost, like those of 8-year-old Christian Moore. 

According to KWCH-TV, Crites, the mother of the boy who was feeling anxious on his first day of school, struggles with speech. She also hopes that this could be the start of a beautiful friendship between the two boys after sharing this moment together. 

Crite’s mother also went on comment on Moore’s Facebook post that “it doesn’t matter color, it doesn’t matter gender, it doesn’t matter disability, and it doesn’t matter anything, just be kind, open your heart… it’s what we need in this world.” 

We can totally get behind this sentiment. This moment should serve as an example and as a testament to what kindness can do. 

 
 

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Stephen And Ayesha Curry Are Donating Thousands of Books To Schools For Christmas

Entertainment

Stephen And Ayesha Curry Are Donating Thousands of Books To Schools For Christmas

Handout / Getty

Hark the herald! Stephen and Ayesha Claus Curry– are here to bring literary joy this season.

The Golden State Warrior and his wife are donating thousands of books to schools around Oakland, California this holiday season in an effort to bring joy to children.

The couple, behind Eat. Learn. Play. Foundation, made the announcement earlier this week.

“We along with our entire team at Eat. Learn. Play. understand the importance of early childhood education, especially when it comes to literacy,” Stephen and Ayesha told People magazine in a recent interview. “Nothing is more basic, more essential, more foundational, or more important to a child’s success in life than the ability to read well. We know there is a lot of work to be done, but with partners like Literati, we’re hopeful that we will be able to make an impact on these children’s lives.”

The Currys’ donations will arrive to schools in boxes that will contain six books.

The packages will include five children’s books and one for adults. All of which come from Stephen Curry’s “Underrated” book club selection.

Along with their thousand book giveaway, the couple’s Eat. Learn. Play. Foundation will donate boxes to students who are learning remotely amid the ongoing coronavirus pandemic in collaboration with and Literati. Fourteen thousand boxes will go directly to Oakland Unified Schools.

According to people, “The remainder of the donation, which was also made possible through Bay Area investor Aydin Senkut of Felicis Ventures, will be distributed through community partners in the new year.”

Speaking about their own experiences of teaching their children during the ongoing coronavirus pandemic, Stephen and Ayesha (who are parents to Canon W. Jack, 2, Ryan Carson, 5, and Riley, 8) told People that they’ve been hard work attempting to keep their children busy and learning.

“My oldest is pretty disciplined so that’s been easy, but our 5-year-old has a little trouble staying engaged for an extended period of time,” Ayesha, host of ABC’s new show “Family Food Fight,” explained.

Ayesha says she has found that taking part in “some kind of physical activity right before class starts” helps her daughter Ryan “to focus the mind and get some of the wiggles out, and periodic ‘dance breaks’ between lessons.”

“We also added resistance workout bands to the legs of her chair, which give her something to do if she gets antsy during a long Zoom session,” Stephen added.

“Luckily for me, Stephen has really stepped in with education and their schooling. And I’m okay with that because I birthed them so now [he] can birth and nurture their education,” Ayesha joked in a recent episode of “The Kelly Clarkson Show.”

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This Pop-Up School For Migrant Kids Along The Border Went Virtual Thanks To Covid-19 But It’s Thriving More Than Ever

Things That Matter

This Pop-Up School For Migrant Kids Along The Border Went Virtual Thanks To Covid-19 But It’s Thriving More Than Ever

John Moore / Getty Images

The people traveling hundreds or thousands of miles to reach the U.S.-Mexico border aren’t living in some ‘migrant vaccuum’ where nothing else matters. They still have lives to live and experiences to have and, particularly for the young ones, an education to continue.

That was the thinking behind one sidewalk school that popped up in one of the many migrant camps along the U.S.-Mexico border. It was becoming filled with children from across Latin America who were forced to wait out their asylum process from within the border camps, thanks to Trump’s “Remain in Mexico” policy. But their need for an education didn’t just go away.

One woman – with no formal teacher training – decided to help and launched what was called a ‘sidewalk school’ for kids in the camp. But it’s been incredible successful and has blossomed into an online academy for kids throughout the border region.

Despite Covid-19, this pop-up school for migrant kids along the border is thriving.

Just as the Coronavirus pandemic has impacted schools around the world, it’s also having an impact on a pop-up sidewalk school for asylum seekers at the U.S.-Mexico border.

The school, which launched to help fill the educational needs of a growing group of kids stuck at the border, had to go to virtual learning because of the pandemic. But instead of seeing that as a challenge, the school instead has blossomed.

What started out with one teacher at one camp on a sidewalk, how now blossomed by hiring 20 teachers – all asylum seekers themselves – to give classes via Zoom to children across the border region.

To be able to switch to distance learning, the teachers and students were outfitted with more than 200 Amazon tablets by The Sidewalk School for Children Asylum Seekers. The organization was founded by Felicia Rangel-Samponaro, who lives across the border in Brownsville, Texas, and has been crossing to help the asylum seekers by providing them food and books.

It started in just one migrant camp with one teacher but it’s blossomed ever since.

A program like the sidewalk school was severely needed as hundreds and thousands of kids starting being forced to wait at the U.S.-Mexico border. It’s well-known that the border region is one of the most dangerous and violent parts of Mexico and that only underscores the need for quality activities.

Many point out that parents aren’t sending their kids to Mexican schools because they’re afraid to be apart from them. Crime is common here, and kidnappings have been reported. Other parents say registering for school in Mexico is difficult. But program leaders want the kids to be able to continue their education, and they say that many of the asylum-seekers have skill sets they can put to use at the school.

Parents are grateful, too, with one woman telling NPR that she knows “her children will be safe at the sidewalk school, and it gives her time to meet with an immigration lawyer. Volunteer attorneys have been coming over on the weekends to give free legal advice. The asylum-seekers could wait for months to be able to make their asylum case in the U.S.”

Teachers try to give the students some sense of normalcy amid the often dire circumstances at the border.

Credit: John Moore / Getty Images

Many students start their day with an arts and crafts class. Kids are asked to draw on paper plates then outline them with flue and drop glitter. Then they get to hang their creations from trees.

One impromptu teacher, who told NPR he preferred to remain anonymous, said that he wants the kids to “see other people appreciate the artwork they did and let them know how important they are, too, even to people, like, just walking past and driving by. It’s beautiful work.

The classes have offered children not only the chance to catch up on studies that were interrupted when their families fled violence in their homelands, but also a distraction from the long days of boredom.

Trump’s ‘Remain in Mexico’ policy is what is fueling the need for programs like these.

Credit: JULIO CESAR AGUILAR/AFP via Getty Images

It’s the Trump policy of ‘Remain in Mexico’ that has forced programs like these to exist in the first place. The program forces asylum seekers to wait south of the border as their immigration cases proceed through the U.S. court system.

It leaves thousands of families living in tents or at Mexican shelters. Previously, asylum seekers were allowed to remain in the United States with relatives or other sponsors while their cases proceeded.

Many have spent more than a year with their lives in limbo, and the wait has only grown longer with the Trump administration suspending immigration court hearings for asylum-seekers during the pandemic.

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