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Experts Are Warning There Will Be A Wave Of ICE Raids This Weekend But Here’s What You And Your Loved Ones Need To Know To Protect Yourselves

Immigrant communities across the country and their allies are preparing for nationwide raids by Immigration and Customs Enforcement planned to begin Sunday that will target undocumented members of immigrant families in at least nine major cities.

The cities where raids will take place are said to be Atlanta, Baltimore, Chicago, Denver, Houston, Los Angeles, Miami, New York, and San Francisco. New Orleans had been on the list, but the city announced this weekend that ICE was temporarily postponing the raids due to Tropical Storm Barry. 

The Trump administration is reportedly starting its planned ICE raids on Sunday.

Everyone in the U.S. has certain rights guaranteed under the U.S. Constitution, regardless of your immigration status. You can’t always control whether you will come in contact with immigration or law enforcement. It is important to know and practice these scenarios so that you and your friends, family, and colleagues are prepared for any situation.

Understanding what your fundamental rights are and how to use them will help you advocate for yourself and respond appropriately if you encounter the police or immigration enforcement.

And in some parts of the country there’s reports that the raids have already started.

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A group of Bay Area immigration attorneys entered federal ICE offices in San Francisco during the noon hour Thursday to demand information about the threat of immigration raids this weekend.

“We want to know what their plans are, who they are targeting and where individuals will be process so they can have access to attorneys,” said immigration attorney Siobhan Waldron.

Attorneys say these raids are already underway in the Bay Area, beginning in Contra Costa County this past Sunday. 

It’s more important than ever to know your rights so you can protect yourself and help others.

As Sunday approaches, immigrant rights groups have been ramping up efforts to make sure affected communities know their rights and are prepared for possible raids.

Immigrant right’s organizations and politicians have been taking to social media to share important information with vulnerable communities.

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Rep. Omar (MN) took to Twitter to share a helpful guide put together by the ACLU but also to say “These raids will dehumanize immigrants and tear families apart. This will not make our country any stronger. It will only traumatize children, destroy lives, and make our country less safe.”

If you’re undocumented, it’s absolutely vital that you know your rights.

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If ICE officers come to your home, don’t open the door, according to the ACLU. Agents can’t come into your house unless you let them in or they have a search warrant signed by a judge. Ask officers to pass any warrants under the door, and check that it is a judicial search warrant ― not just an arrest warrant, as that’s not enough ― and that it’s signed by a judge. 

If they come in anyway, don’t physically resist arrest. Say “I do not consent to your entry” and say you have a right to remain silent and want to speak to a lawyer. Do not sign any papers without seeing a lawyer, as these may be papers asking you to consent to your own removal. 

Si está indocumentado, es muy importante que conozca sus derechos.

Credit: @ACLU / Twitter

Si los agentes de ICE van a su casa, no abra la puerta, de acuerdo con la ACLU. Los agentes no pueden entrar a su casa a menos que los deje entrar o tengan una orden de registro firmada por un juez. Pídales a los oficiales que aprueben cualquier orden bajo la puerta y verifique que se trata de una orden de registro judicial, no solo una orden de arresto, ya que no es suficiente, y que está firmado por un juez.

Si entran, no resistan físicamente el arresto. Diga “No doy mi consentimiento para su entrada” y diga que tiene derecho a permanecer callado y desea hablar con un abogado. No firme ningún documento sin consultar a un abogado, ya que pueden ser documentos que le piden su consentimiento para su propia eliminación.

Informed Immigrant also offers downloadable Red Cards that can be used if you’re afraid that you might say the wrong thing to an ICE officer.

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You can download them in a variety of different languages here.

If you’re a concerned neighbor, know how you can help.

Do not interfere physically in an arrest, but you can document it. You have a right to take photos, video or notes on what happened, as well as to ask for officers’ badge numbers.  

You can call local “rapid response” hotlines to report ICE activity and enforcement actions. 

And, perhaps most importantly, know that it’s very rare for ICE to obtain a proper judicial warrant.

According to legal expert Shannon Camacho, she says in an interview with DemocracyNow.org, that “ICE only has permission to enter an individual’s home if they have a judicial warrant that is signed by a judge. And not only that, but that judicial warrant has to have all of the information, including the person’s name, the person’s address, the time of the incident. All of that has to be accurate.”

She adds: “So, I can say, and our attorneys know this very well, that it is very rare that ICE is actually able to obtain a judicial arrest warrant. Most of the time they do not have that, meaning they do not have permission to enter people’s homes.”

READ: ICE Raids Ordered To Begin On Sunday In Major Cities

ICE Is Arresting And Deporting Undocumented Marchers Who Attend Black Lives Matter Protests

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ICE Is Arresting And Deporting Undocumented Marchers Who Attend Black Lives Matter Protests

@JesusOhh_ / Twitter

Since the death of George Floyd reverberated across the world, millions of Americans have taken to the streets to demand justice and racial equality. Along with them have been other communities who are so often victimized by police – including undocumented residents.

Under the current immigration system, immigrants are subject to daily intimidation, violence, and abuse by the authorities – at the border, in their neighbourhoods, and at detention facilities. 

As the national outcry against police brutality and racial injustice intensify, and people continue to take to the streets – it’s important to stay alert and keep yourself and your family safe as ICE is looking for immigrants at BLM protests across the country.

Authorities have invited ICE agents to infiltrate Black Lives Matter protests across the U.S.

From New York to Arizona, ICE agents have actively been patrolling BLM protests, looking to arrest and deport undocumented participants.

In New York City, ICE agents violently tackled and detained a protester. In Arizona, ICE collaborated with the local police to detain immigrants who were mistakenly arrested near a protest site and have set in motion their deportation proceedings.

The presence of ICE agents at protests and their abuse of both immigrants and U.S. citizens serve as a reminder that the American immigration mechanism is yet another manifestation of systemic racism and police brutality. 

Even U.S. citizens who appear Latino are at risk of dangerous interactions with ICE.

Credit: Juan Delgado / Getty Images

Just last week, a U.S. citizen from Puerto Rico was marching in New York at a BLM protest, when he was jumped by five ICE agents. He was violently pushed to the ground, held at gunpoint, and handcuffed and searched without explanation. In a later statement, ICE declared that the man was suspected of holding a firearm, and that no arrest was made once no weapon was found. The man, who is a military veteran, had sustained several bruises from the incident and preferred not to disclose his identity. 

“It’s just really concerning to see ICE out on the street, grabbing somebody who’s peacefully protesting before the curfew, who was doing absolutely nothing wrong,” said Terry Lawson, a supervising policy attorney at the Immigrant Defense Project, in an interview for NBC News.

The migrant advocacy community has tried its best to keep people aware of the risk of joining in protests.

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As protests spread across the country following George Floyd’s death in late May, so did warnings to undocumented immigrants thinking about joining the demonstrations.

Messages on social media warned that ICE officers were on the ground: “ICE is at the protest, if you’re undocumented leave!” one person tweeted.

“Please if you’re of undocumented status or have DACA PLEASE PRIORITIZE YOUR SAFETY FIRST! ICE is taking advantage,” read another tweet.

“CBP and ICE agents are at protests across the country. They have made claims to the media they aren’t going to arrest people, but we know they are notorious liars,” tweeted the advocacy group United We Dream.

There were soon online guides with resources on what undocumented people could do to stay safe, because an arrest at a protest has the potential to end in deportation.

Police working with ICE is nothing new – but the fact that they were working at BLM protests put many on edge.

Credit: Ross Franklin / Getty Images

In Arizona, police and ICE have worked closely together for decades. In fact, many protesters in Phoenix last week not only demanded an end to police brutality but also urged the Phoenix Police Department to end its collaboration with ICE. Similar protests have taken place in Los Angeles, New York, and Chicago.

These co-policing techniques are turning any interaction with the cops into a potential crisis for undocumented immigrants and their families.

According to US Customs and Border Protection, the agency has been asked to deploy resources to “several states undertaking various operational support roles at the request of fellow law enforcement agencies.” The CBP agents were sent to “confront the lawless actions of rioters,” not to carry out an immigration enforcement mission.

The Little Girl Crying For Her Father After An ICE Raid In Mississippi Has Finally Been Reunited With Him

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The Little Girl Crying For Her Father After An ICE Raid In Mississippi Has Finally Been Reunited With Him

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In August, an appalling scene came out of the small town of Morton, Mississippi, where U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) agents detained more than 600 people. ICE agents suspected that after a yearlong investigation, Koch Foods (a food processing plant) had hired hundreds of undocumented people. On the morning of Aug. 7, after many of the workers had dropped off their children at school, they went to work as usual only to be detained by immigration agents. The people were instructed to get on a bus where they would be taken to a detention center. Many of the children didn’t have a ride after school and were left without their parents. One little girl, in particular, captured the heart of many. 

A young girl made national news when she cried out for her dad, who had been detained by ICE. Now, three months later, he has been released. 

Magdalena Gomez Gregorio pleaded on television that she wanted her dad back and that he was not a criminal. The poor girl could bearly speak because she was so emotional. Gomez Gregorio was one of several kids who were left without their parents in what was viewed as the most massive raid in the country’s history.  

“Government, please show some heart,” the 11-year-old girl said in August, according to WJTV. “Let my parent be free and everyone else, please don’t leave the child with cryness [sic] and everything. I need my dad … he’s not a criminal.”

At least 680 people were detained in August. ICE, in a rare move, said they would release at least one parent if both parents were arrested, so the children wouldn’t be completely alone. 

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A couple of days after the raid, the Department of Justice in Mississippi said they would release 30 people based on “humanitarian grounds,” but it was unclear if one of Gomez Gregorio’s parents was released during that time. 

“As part of HSI procedures pursuant to this operation, if HSI encountered two alien parents with minor children at home, HSI released one of the parents on humanitarian grounds and returned that individual to the place from which they were arrested. HSI similarly released any single alien parent with minor children at home on humanitarian grounds and physically returned that person to the place where he or she was originally detained. Based on these procedures, it is believed that all children were with at least one of their parents as of last night,” the Department of Justice in Mississippi stated

The little girl’s dad, Andres Gomez-Jorge, was finally released from detention after his friends and family raised $7,500 for his bond.

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CNN reports that the family is back together again, including with their mom. The main problem now is that they both are out of work. According to the network, Gomez-Jorge has to support his family of six, and as of now, are only surviving from generous donations. 

While agents say, they had been investigating the food plant for a year, after detaining more than 600 people, only 11 people were prosecuted. 

Owners of the food plant, the ones responsible for doing the hiring, were never charged for their participation in hiring people with fraudulent information. 

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“These are not new laws, nor is the enforcement of them new,” then-acting ICE director Matt Albence said in August, according to CNN. 

“The arrests today were the result of a year-long criminal investigation. And the arrests and warrants that were executed today are just another step in that investigation.”

However, not much came out of that raid that instilled fear in the Latino community. We should note that the ICE raid in Mississippi occurred just days after the El Paso shooting that left 22 people dead and another 24 injured. 

READ: Two Kids Were Left Alone For Eight Days After Their Parents Were Detained In The Mississippi ICE Raids