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Experts Are Warning There Will Be A Wave Of ICE Raids This Weekend But Here’s What You And Your Loved Ones Need To Know To Protect Yourselves

Immigrant communities across the country and their allies are preparing for nationwide raids by Immigration and Customs Enforcement planned to begin Sunday that will target undocumented members of immigrant families in at least nine major cities.

The cities where raids will take place are said to be Atlanta, Baltimore, Chicago, Denver, Houston, Los Angeles, Miami, New York, and San Francisco. New Orleans had been on the list, but the city announced this weekend that ICE was temporarily postponing the raids due to Tropical Storm Barry. 

The Trump administration is reportedly starting its planned ICE raids on Sunday.

Everyone in the U.S. has certain rights guaranteed under the U.S. Constitution, regardless of your immigration status. You can’t always control whether you will come in contact with immigration or law enforcement. It is important to know and practice these scenarios so that you and your friends, family, and colleagues are prepared for any situation.

Understanding what your fundamental rights are and how to use them will help you advocate for yourself and respond appropriately if you encounter the police or immigration enforcement.

And in some parts of the country there’s reports that the raids have already started.

Credit: @kron4news / Twitter

A group of Bay Area immigration attorneys entered federal ICE offices in San Francisco during the noon hour Thursday to demand information about the threat of immigration raids this weekend.

“We want to know what their plans are, who they are targeting and where individuals will be process so they can have access to attorneys,” said immigration attorney Siobhan Waldron.

Attorneys say these raids are already underway in the Bay Area, beginning in Contra Costa County this past Sunday. 

It’s more important than ever to know your rights so you can protect yourself and help others.

As Sunday approaches, immigrant rights groups have been ramping up efforts to make sure affected communities know their rights and are prepared for possible raids.

Immigrant right’s organizations and politicians have been taking to social media to share important information with vulnerable communities.

Credit: @IlhanMN / Twitter

Rep. Omar (MN) took to Twitter to share a helpful guide put together by the ACLU but also to say “These raids will dehumanize immigrants and tear families apart. This will not make our country any stronger. It will only traumatize children, destroy lives, and make our country less safe.”

If you’re undocumented, it’s absolutely vital that you know your rights.

Credit: @WeAreUnidos / Twitter

If ICE officers come to your home, don’t open the door, according to the ACLU. Agents can’t come into your house unless you let them in or they have a search warrant signed by a judge. Ask officers to pass any warrants under the door, and check that it is a judicial search warrant ― not just an arrest warrant, as that’s not enough ― and that it’s signed by a judge. 

If they come in anyway, don’t physically resist arrest. Say “I do not consent to your entry” and say you have a right to remain silent and want to speak to a lawyer. Do not sign any papers without seeing a lawyer, as these may be papers asking you to consent to your own removal. 

Si está indocumentado, es muy importante que conozca sus derechos.

Credit: @ACLU / Twitter

Si los agentes de ICE van a su casa, no abra la puerta, de acuerdo con la ACLU. Los agentes no pueden entrar a su casa a menos que los deje entrar o tengan una orden de registro firmada por un juez. Pídales a los oficiales que aprueben cualquier orden bajo la puerta y verifique que se trata de una orden de registro judicial, no solo una orden de arresto, ya que no es suficiente, y que está firmado por un juez.

Si entran, no resistan físicamente el arresto. Diga “No doy mi consentimiento para su entrada” y diga que tiene derecho a permanecer callado y desea hablar con un abogado. No firme ningún documento sin consultar a un abogado, ya que pueden ser documentos que le piden su consentimiento para su propia eliminación.

Informed Immigrant also offers downloadable Red Cards that can be used if you’re afraid that you might say the wrong thing to an ICE officer.

Credit: @kqed / Twitter

You can download them in a variety of different languages here.

If you’re a concerned neighbor, know how you can help.

Do not interfere physically in an arrest, but you can document it. You have a right to take photos, video or notes on what happened, as well as to ask for officers’ badge numbers.  

You can call local “rapid response” hotlines to report ICE activity and enforcement actions. 

And, perhaps most importantly, know that it’s very rare for ICE to obtain a proper judicial warrant.

According to legal expert Shannon Camacho, she says in an interview with DemocracyNow.org, that “ICE only has permission to enter an individual’s home if they have a judicial warrant that is signed by a judge. And not only that, but that judicial warrant has to have all of the information, including the person’s name, the person’s address, the time of the incident. All of that has to be accurate.”

She adds: “So, I can say, and our attorneys know this very well, that it is very rare that ICE is actually able to obtain a judicial arrest warrant. Most of the time they do not have that, meaning they do not have permission to enter people’s homes.”

READ: ICE Raids Ordered To Begin On Sunday In Major Cities

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ICE Admits It Made A Mistake In Deporting This Guatemalan Man So Why Hasn’t He Been Brought Back?

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ICE Admits It Made A Mistake In Deporting This Guatemalan Man So Why Hasn’t He Been Brought Back?

JOHAN ORDONEZ / Getty Images

Although the Coronavirus pandemic poses special risks to migrants who are returned to their countries – as well as the communities they’re put back into – U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) continues to deport migrants by the thousands.

There have been several reports of deportees spreading Covid-19 back in their communities after being removed from the U.S., which makes sense considering the U.S. is leading the world in Covid-19 infections.

However, ICE has admitted that they made a mistake with one recent deportation, when they removed a man who was legally awaiting his asylum process.

A Guatemalan man was wrongfully deported and ICE admits it was their mistake.

A 29-year-old Guatemalan man seeking asylum in the U.S. was mistakenly deported by authorities despite the lack of a deportation order – and worse, before he even had his first appointment in immigration court.

César Marroquín was deported August 19 – the same day he he was supposed to appear for the first time before an immigration judge. Instead, he was sent back to Guatemala – with dozens of other deportees – the country from which he fled after being the victim of aggression and kidnapping, according to his account.

“They told me that if I didn’t get on the plane, I’d be charged,” Marroquín told Noticias Telemundo. “There was some mistake with me in the system.”

His current attorney, Marty Rosenbluth, believes it is a flagrant error. “I’ve seen quite a few cases of people who were deported in error. I’ve never seen one quite like this where they were deported even before their first hearing, “ he told NBC News.

The Immigration and Customs Enforcement agency, or ICE, said in a statement that Marroquín’s deportation was due to an “administrative error” while his case was still open.

Despite their mistake, Marroquín remains in Guatemala.

Although the mistake lay completely with U.S. ICE agents, Marroquín remains in his native Guatemala at risk of further persecution.

According to Marroquín’s official complaint filed in Guatemala, he said he suffered political persecution and physical violence after he supported a local politician and turned down a request to work with a rival one. After that, he said he was threatened and his home was damaged and raided; he also suspects someone tampered with his car. Marroquín said he was then kidnapped at gunpoint, tortured for several days and then left on the side of the road. He decided to leave the country after that and sought asylum protections in the United States.

The authorities and Marroquín’s attorney are now working on his readmission to the United States.

“This type of gross negligence is completely inexcusable,” said Rosenbluth, his current attorney. “The law is very, very clear that they can’t deport someone in the middle of their immigration court proceedings. They’re just not allowed to do it.”

Of course, not surprisingly, this isn’t the first time the immigration agency has made a mistake in deportations.

In 2018, ICE made a similar mistake with an undocumented inmate at a New Hampshire jail. ICE agents violated an appeals court order and deported the man back to El Salvador, where he lost 60 pounds and was subject to starvation, beatings, and overcrowding, according to the American Civil Liberties Union-New Hampshire, which represents the man.

“This is a very serious matter to us,” said Scott Grant Stewart, a deputy assistant U.S. attorney general, who appeared before a three-judge panel to explain the error. “We’re sorry for the violation of the court’s order. This was inadvertent. We do acknowledge the error.”

In fact, there are thousands of documented cases of U.S. citizens being deported by ICE.

According to a Northwestern University political scientist, Jacqueline Stevens, more than 1,500 U.S. citizens have spent time in immigration detention or even been deported between 2007 and 2015. More recent examples abound of the U.S. government detaining citizens after falsely accusing them of breaking immigration laws.

ICE authorities reportedly detained for three days Jilmar Ramos-Gomez, a veteran born in Grand Rapids, Michigan who served with the Marines in Afghanistan, in 2018 because the agency did not believe he was born here.

ICE also detained for more than three weeks a man named Peter Brown who was born in Philadelphia and lived in the Florida Keys in 2018 because the agency confused him with an undocumented Jamaican immigrant – who was also named Peter Brown.

In 2007, the government settled a lawsuit arising from ICE’s detention of 6-year-old Kebin Reyes. ICE detained the California-born child for 10 hours when it picked up his undocumented father, even though his father immediately handed the authorities Reyes’ U.S. passport to prove the boy’s citizenship. And Justice Department records obtained by the Los Angeles Times indicate that a 10-year-old boy from San Francisco was mistakenly held in immigration detention in Texas for two months, according to his lawyer.

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ICE Is Launching A New Round Of Raids To Boost Trump’s ‘Law And Order’ Campaign

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ICE Is Launching A New Round Of Raids To Boost Trump’s ‘Law And Order’ Campaign

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Despite a growing number of immense challenges across the country, the Trump administration is planning a major offensive against the migrant community. Although he’s in the hospital battling the Coronavirus, Trump’s Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) agency is working to instill fear in the undocumented community with a new round of immigration raids.

The new operation is set to launch this week and will specifically target sanctuary cities and counties to help support Trump’s campaign talk of ‘law & order.’

Already, the nation’s immigrant communities – particularly the Latinx community – are reeling from increased risk of Coronavirus infection to higher rates of unemployment. Now, the community is being forced to consider their next steps as ICE agents roll into major cities across the country to step up enforcement actions.

ICE is launching a new round of immigration raids just weeks before the election.

In what is an obvious attempt to cast himself as the ‘law & order’ president, Trump’s ICE agency is planning a large scale immigration campaign beginning this week. The new campaign will target arrests in U.S. cities and jurisdictions that have adopted “sanctuary” policies, according to three U.S. officials, who spoke to the Washington Post.

The operation, known informally as the “sanctuary op,” will likely launch in California before expanding to other cities, including Denver and Philadelphia. Chad Wolf, acting secretary of the Department of Homeland Security, probably will travel to at least one of the cities where the operation will take place to boost President Trump’s claims that leaders in those cities have failed to protect residents from dangerous criminals, two officials told The Post.

Two officials told The Post anonymously that the operation is more about getting a political message across than a major operation by ICE, stressing that the agency is already working hard to combat violators of immigration policy daily, often without much publicity.

Trump hopes to target sanctuary cities to send the message that Democrats are weak on crime.

The Trump Administration has made no secret of its contempt for cities and other jurisdictions that have enacted so-called sanctuary policies. In fact, ICE has repeatedly threatened cities and counties with such policies with increased enforcement actions, saying they’ll send more agents to make arrests in their jurisdictions if they continue advocating such policies.

Cities that normally operate with sanctuary policies usually refuse to hold immigrants in jail longer than they are required so that ICE officers can take them into custody. Although ICE agents are still able to pick up people suspected of immigration violations, they do so without the help of local law enforcement such as a coordinated handover. It means that ICE agents usually have a much harder time picking up wanted people in cities which do not officially cooperate with the agency.

“Generally speaking, as ICE has noted for years, in jurisdictions where cooperation does not exist and ICE is not allowed to assume custody of aliens from jails, ICE is forced to arrest at-large criminal aliens out in the communities instead of under the safe confines of a jail,’ said Mike Alvarez, an ICE spokesman.

ICE has long floated possible campaigns meant to capture as many migrants as possible.

The idea for a campaign publicizing criminal arrests in sanctuary cities has been floated repeatedly during the Trump administration, two officials said, and was under consideration actively this spring before the Coronavirus pandemic. After the outbreak, ICE deferred some of its enforcement plans, citing health risks, and during that time, the agency’s arrests dropped by about one-third, statistics show.

Just last year, the White House had pushed for a “family op”, with the intent of targeting migrant parents with children. However, the operation failed to gain the number of arrests that Trump had wanted so it was scrapped. The president tipped off that operation, announcing it in a tweet. Some ICE officials privately attributed the operation’s underwhelming results to Trump’s boasting and indiscipline.

Another such plan – meant to punish sanctuary cities – was to bus asylum-seeking migrants from the border and drop them off in San Francisco, a city with a sanctuary policy. It was met with widespread ridicule.

However, operations such as these do have profound impacts on migrant communities. As news of enforcement operations such as these spread, many immigrants go deeper underground, living in fear that they may be arrested and deported while their children – often times U.S. citizens – will be left behind.

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